How can you get in off the wait list?

Admissions Decisions

Our Counselors Answered:

How can you get in off the wait list?

Nina BerlerFounderunCommon Apps

Getting in Off the Wait List

This is a topic which is near to me, having affected my family and my students in the last few years. The first thing a student and his or her family need to know is that while getting in off a wait list is possible, it is not likely. Colleges have been known to maintain very large wait lists because it is sometimes difficult to estimate actual yield. That said, I always want my students to shoot high, and that includes not giving up hope if they really want to attend a school at which they are wait listed. The first thing the student needs to do is return the wait list card or form and, at the same time, write a heartfelt note explaining how much they love the college and would attend if accepted. (Sometimes it’s not possible to say this if financial aid is uncertain.) This should be addressed to the dean of admission and the admissions rep from the geographic area. If there are any notable circumstances that occur during the wait list period such as honors and awards, the student needs to notify the admissions office. People talk about colleges’ secret formulas for assigning various priorities to the wait list. The student will rarely know those details if that is indeed the case. Students should always make sure that they’ve left a deposit at their second-choice school. Hopefully, all these situations will have a happy ending.

 
Suzan ReznickIndependent Educational ConsultantThe College Connection

Follow-up information can be key

For all of my clients who have been deferred or wait-listed, I advise them to send a letter to the admissions office. This letter is a way or confirming their continued enthusiasm for the school as well as providing any new information that might impact their admissions decision. The letter could include any new clubs, leadership, awards and/or honors. It might not be a bad idea to send an additional recommendation letter and/or an additional essay or writing sample. You need to convey to the college that you are a strong applicant and would be likely to enroll if accepted.

Ellen [email protected]OwnerEllen Richards Admissions Consulting

Be prepared for April – tips for surviving the college crunch

April is a month of colliding forces when it comes to the lives of high school seniors heading to college in the fall. Applications are in, acceptances or rejections are appearing in mailboxes, AP exams are looming and as all these elements converge, the transition to adulthood becomes more of a reality with each passing day. The amount of stress in this final leg of the race would be enough to put anyone off their game, so here are a few tips for graduating seniors to help manage and enjoy life during the home stretch. 1. Understand You’re Not the Only One April isn’t just a preview for the changes in your own life, but you also get to observe those of your friends firsthand. The admissions process is more difficult and confusing than ever before, and there will be inevitable rewards and disappointments for everyone involved. Anyone who’s been there for a friend in need or a friend with something to celebrate knows how emotionally draining it can be. To avoid being pulled in all directions and losing focus on your own life, at this critical juncture prepare two simple and sincere responses to either outcome. Compliment the hard work and dedication of your peers who were admitted to the college of their choice – the truth is, they earned it. Comfort your friends who missed out on the big envelope by reiterating how random the admissions process can be, and how hard work is rewarded in life, regardless of where you got your degree – the truth is, in many cases, it doesn’t matter where you go, as long as you make the most of it. Being a source of either sincere comfort or praise will allow you to be there for your friends while not getting drawn into anyone’s drama but your own. 2. Make an Informed Decision Hopefully, come envelope day, your mailbox will overflow with fat acceptance letters from schools that are fighting for your attendance. Obviously something about each of these schools attracted you, or you wouldn’t have wasted the time and money applying. Now it’s time to get down to the nitty-gritty and see which institution will make you happiest in terms of atmosphere and academics. Find out which of your choices offers institutional days for accepted students, allowing them to visit, go to class and get acclimated. Go on a weekday, attend some freshman lectures, and try to spend the night at a dorm, if possible. These sorts of visits provide much more insight into a college than a simple summer campus tour or an admissions office pitch. They’re experiences that will really help you decide which school is the best place to spend the next four years of your life. 3. Be Proactive About the Waiting List First thing to know about the waiting list – it’s not over yet. While some view the notification that they’ve been wait listed as simply a brief reprieve until the inevitable “Thank you for your application, but…” letter, there are some tried and true methods of turning a spot on the waiting list into a spot on the acceptance list. When you’re wait-listed, the first thing to remember is that you have not been rejected. You still have a chance to prove yourself to admissions officers, so grab it. First, find out who handled the applications from your school, and contact them. Introduce yourself and explain what high school you attend, so you can make sure they can pull your file and have it on hand. Then let them know that you were happy to be put on the waiting list because it means you still have a chance to be offered admittance. Make it clear that their school is still your first choice by far and that you’re even willing to sacrifice the deposit on your second choice, should you be taken off the wait list after May 1st. In conclusion, tell the officer they can expect a letter from you in the near-future explaining in greater detail why you should be accepted. Try to put it on your school’s letterhead and print it on bonded paper. Repeat that their institution is your first choice, that you are willing to give up a deposit on your second choice should it come to that, then start to hit on the two to three points on your resume that really make you stand out. Maybe you even know an alumnus of the school that will speak up on your behalf. It wouldn’t hurt to include a short missive from them. It’s important they know what they’ll be missing if they reject you. Send the letter by e-mail and snail mail personally to the admissions officer with whom you spoke. Finally, relax. Take a deep breath and rest easy knowing you’ve been proactive and done everything possible to gain admission to your dream school. 4. Fight for Financial Aid Admission is one thing, attendance is another. There are many schools today that are prohibitively expensive, and in this economy, financial aid is going to be difficult to come by regardless of how worthy the applicant. But if you receive an insufficient offer, don’t fret. You still have some bargaining power. The school admitted you for a reason, and they won’t want to lose you, which will make them, at the very least, approachable when it comes to aid issues. Make full use of this fact, and perhaps let them know that you’ve received a better offer from their rival. Most colleges will work hard to help you attend if it means they can keep a worthy candidate from a competitors. If your situation has worsened significantly this year, it could certainly make a difference. Make your chosen school aware of any change in your family’s finances, and support your claims with the proper documentation. Just remember, your biggest bargaining chip is that you were accepted – they want you, so take advantage of that fact Following these tips will give you the tools to make your last April as a high school student more sentimental than stressful and allow the rest of the journey to higher education run as smoothly as possible.

Helen H. ChoiOwnerAdmissions Mavens

Demonstrate Continued Interest and Cross Your Fingers

If you decide to remain on a school’s waitlist, be sure to let them know of your decision. Once you have done this, you might want to write the admissions committee a letter informing them of any new (and relevant) developments in your life. After that — the ball’s in their court, and there’s not much you can do. Don’t bake cookies and send them to the school. Don’t e-mail your regional admissions officer every day/week asking them for updates. Why? Well — bombarding admissions officers with desperate-sounding emails and baked goods just don’t work. Remember that application that you sent off in the winter? THAT’S what they’ll be looking at if they decide to re-visit your application — not your scary emails and double fudge brownies!

Steven CrispOwner Crisp College Advising

How can you get in off the wait list?

In most cases there isn’t much you can do to get yourself off of the wait list. The wait list is used as a backup for admission offices. They use it to fill spots. So if they have students who don’t deposit and decide to go elsewhere, then they go to the wait list to fill those spots. However, you can always contact the admission office to ask them what they want. They will usually say an updated transcript, new test scores etc. What they don’t want is an additional letter or recommendation or another essay.

Erica WhiteCollege & Career CounselorMiddletown High School

Update your information as needed…

If you get waitlisted, I would send a letter to the admissions office and let them know you are still interested in their school and would like to remain on the waitlist. Some schools, take you off the waitlist, unless they hear from you. I would continue to stay involved in activities and community service. If you join a new club or recieve any new awards I would send an email or a letter to the admissions office notifying them. I would also send 3rd quarter grades to show your academic strengths.

Laura O’Brien GatzionisFounderEducational Advisory Services

Trying to successfully move off the wait list

If your first choice college has wait listed you, you need to write the admissions office a letter and state that you definitely want to stay on the wait list. If you will attend the school if you are given the opportunity, you should say so very clearly. If you think that you will be a good addition to the campus, then explain why. If there are new achievements that you have managed during the spring of your senior year, then you should mention them. This is your last chance to add another dimension to your application. After you have sent the letter, then relax and start to discover the great things about your second choice school–and do not forget to make the deposit at that school! If you do move off the wait list then do not forget the inform the school to which you have already given your deposit that you will not be matriculating there. This will allow one of your peers to move off of that school’s wait list to take your spot!

Helen H. ChoiOwnerAdmissions Mavens

Demonstrate Continued Interest and Cross Your Fingers

If you decide to remain on a school’s waitlist, be sure to let them know of your decision. Once you have done this, you might want to write the admissions committee a letter informing them of any new (and relevant) developments in your life. After that — the ball’s in their court, and there’s not much you can do. Don’t bake cookies and send them to the school. Don’t e-mail your regional admissions officer every day/week asking them for updates. Why? Well — bombarding admissions officers with desperate-sounding emails and baked goods just don’t work. Remember that application that you sent off in the winter? THAT’S what they’ll be looking at if they decide to re-visit your application — not your scary emails and double fudge brownies!

Annie ReznikCounselor/CEOCollege Guidance Coach

Institutional Needs Drive Wait List

Determinations about wait list activity are driven solely by the needs of an individual institution. Wait list activity varies wildly because both the timing and number of wait list admissions depends upon enrollment decisions made by admitted students. Wait lists enable enrollment managers to secure class sizes with pinpoint accuracy. From year to year, it is impossible to predict the likelihood of admission for students who have earned a position on the wait list. To put yourself in the best possible position, provide colleges with new academic information (updated grades) and a sincere expression of interest.

Annie ReznikCounselor/CEOCollege Guidance Coach

Institutional Needs Drive Wait List

Determinations about wait list activity are driven solely by the needs of an individual institution. Wait list activity varies wildly because both the timing and number of wait list admissions depends upon enrollment decisions made by admitted students. Wait lists enable enrollment managers to secure class sizes with pinpoint accuracy. From year to year, it is impossible to predict the likelihood of admission for students who have earned a position on the wait list. To put yourself in the best possible position, provide colleges with new academic information (updated grades) and a sincere expression of interest.

Rana SlosbergOwnerSlosberg College Solutions LLC

Get in off the waitlist

If you have been waitlisted for your first-choice college, contact admissions and let them know you really want to go to their college and that if you are accepted off of the wait list, you will attend. Send them any new information that will shed a good light on you (e.g., strong Senior grades, new awards or honors, new leadership positions).

Trevor CreedenDirector of College and Career CounselingDelaware County Christian School

How can you get in off the wait list?

If waitlisted, you first need to make sure your name stays on the waitlist. You need to write back to them and tell them that you would like to stay on the waitlist. Over half of a waitlist sometimes will go away because those students don’t ask to stay on it. Then it is just a matter of waiting to see when you may get a response from them that you have been accepted off the waitlist. Most of the time, when final decisions come out there are only a couple SAT tests left to take. If your SAT scores are what are keeping you on a waitlist, definitely take it one more time to see if you can bring your score up. Sending them an additional letter and final grades (if they were good) may help but make sure you remind them once a week that you want to stay on it and their school is on the top of your list.

Trevor CreedenDirector of College and Career CounselingDelaware County Christian School

How can you get in off the wait list?

If waitlisted, you first need to make sure your name stays on the waitlist. You need to write back to them and tell them that you would like to stay on the waitlist. Over half of a waitlist sometimes will go away because those students don’t ask to stay on it. Then it is just a matter of waiting to see when you may get a response from them that you have been accepted off the waitlist. Most of the time, when final decisions come out there are only a couple SAT tests left to take. If your SAT scores are what are keeping you on a waitlist, definitely take it one more time to see if you can bring your score up. Sending them an additional letter and final grades (if they were good) may help but make sure you remind them once a week that you want to stay on it and their school is on the top of your list.

王文君 June ScortinoPresidentIVY Counselors Network

keep the communication going

you should send transcript or middle term report to the college you may write letter to confirm you as the wait list student other than that, you really has little to do unless your counselor would work for you on this one.

Bill PrudenHead of Upper School, College CounselorRavenscroft School

Getting Off the Waitlist: It is About Institutional Needs

Waitlists are tricky. Some schools use them extensively, regularly going to the list to complete their class. However there are others that know their yields so well that they seldom resort to the list, and actually use it only as an alternative to denial for political or alumni related reasons. In general if a school goes to the waitlist, the choices they make are usually based on filling whatever needs they may have in the incoming class. If when the dust has settled and the school sees they have five spots available but recognize that a particular state remains unrepresented they are apt to see if they have a waitlist candidate who can fill that void. And so it goes. In the end there really is not much an applicant can do they are on the waitlist beyond making sure the school knows that you want to be a part of their community.

Brittany MaschalFounder/DirectorB. Maschal Educational Consulting

How can you get in off the wait list?

Be proactive! Although it is common knowledge that not many people get in after being deferred or waitlisted, it is not impossible. First you should have your high school counselor call and see if they can get any info s to why this was the decision that was made. They should also advocate for you throughout this process, sending updated grades and other accolades or updates from teachers as applicable. They need to be making these calls! Students should also write an update letter – deferral or waitlist letter – this letter should provide any/all updates since the time you applied in terms of academic, extracurriculars, awards/honors, anything that will ADD to your file. If you can get to campus again to show your continued interest that is also a plus!

Lora LewisEducational ConsultantLora Lewis Consulting

How can you get in off the wait list?

Send a letter expressing your strong continued interest. If you’re comfortable, let them know that you’re committed to attending if admitted off the wait-list. Share any new information, including improved grades, honors you’ve received, or other spring term accomplishments that weren’t noted on your application last fall. After this, cross your fingers and get on with making the best choice from among the colleges that accepted you. Don’t waste your time with hounding or gimmicks like cookies for the admissions staff; they won’t help your case, and they might even hurt it.

Sarah ContomichalosManagerEducational Advisory Services, LLC

How can you get in off the wait list?

First, follow the college’s instructions precisely. Write a letter to the admissions office stating why you wish to attend this particular college. The more specific your one page letter the better. If indeed, the WL college is your first choice, let admissions know that if you are taken off the WL you will attend but only do this is it is true. Often when students are taken off the wait list they are offered 24 hours to accept of decline the offer so have your answer ready.

Benjamin CaldarelliPartnerPrinceton College Consulting, LLC

How can you get in off the wait list?

A well written and compelling appeal letter that updates the school on your academic progress and indicates your continued interest is most important.

Rebecca JosephExecutive Director & Foundergetmetocollege.org

How can you get in off the wait list?

You can do many things to help set yourself apart from other students on the waitlist. First, make sure to communicate anything new that has happened to you since you first applied to the admissions office. Highlight academic accomplishments, awards, activities, etc. Then have a senior year teacher write you an additional letter of recommendation. Also have your counselor contact the college. Send in a project or paper that you wrote recently that reflects your intellectual or activity strength. Visit the campus after May 1 and check in with the admissions office. Don’t overwhelm the college but keep submitting this information until you hear. But remember that none of this means that you will get off the list as it is often factors way beyond your control that affect who gets off a list. You can and will find happiness at another college.

Geoff BroomeAssistant Director of AdmissionsWidener University

How can you get in off the wait list?

Write a formal letter explaining your fit academically and socially to the university admissions team. Visit campus again. Attend an open house. Let the college know that you are still interested in matriculating at their institution. Take the SAT or ACT over again and report your scores to them. Send the school an updated transcript with current high school grades. If you have any other success that occur after you have been wait-listed, let the school know. Try to compile the data. Don’t send a piece of information every time that you get it. There is a fine line of persuasive and pushy.

Geoff BroomeAssistant Director of AdmissionsWidener University

How can you get in off the wait list?

Write a formal letter explaining your fit academically and socially to the university admissions team. Visit campus again. Attend an open house. Let the college know that you are still interested in matriculating at their institution. Take the SAT or ACT over again and report your scores to them. Send the school an updated transcript with current high school grades. If you have any other success that occur after you have been wait-listed, let the school know. Try to compile the data. Don’t send a piece of information every time that you get it. There is a fine line of persuasive and pushy.

Nancy MilneOwnerMilne Collegiate Consulting

How can you get in off the wait list?

First, contact the admissions office to see if you can learn where your application fell short. Address those issues in a letter, expressing your continued interest in the institution. If they offer interviews and you didn’t have one yet, by all means try to schedule an appointment. Quite possibly it is your transcript that is a concern; all the more reason to not slack off senior year and definitely send along your grades as soon as they are available. Whatever you do, don’t badger the admissions office, don’t stalk them on facebook, remind yourself that everything happens for a reason and this is why you applied to other schools. Good luck!

Kris HintzFounderPosition U 4 College LLC

How can you get in off the wait list?

If the college is still your first choice, express your interest to your guidance counselor and communicate it directly with admissions as well. Beyond that, that is all you can do. Do not pester the admissions department; they know you would like to move off the wait list. Make sure that a deposit is sent in by May 1 to a school that has outright admitted you, and which you would very much like to attend. Wait lists are a long shot! You need to de-invest emotionally in the wait list school, and wrap your mind around the most likely outcome.

Patricia AviezerPresidentInside Track To College, Inc.

How can you get in off the wait list?

Trying to decide if you want to remain on their waitlist? Start by asking yourself some questions: 1. Do I want to remain on their waitlist? 2. Is there something more that I could add that would strengthen my application? 3. Do I want to commit to the work involved in putting together extra support material to send to this college? 4. How do I really feel about a college that didn’t offer me admission on the first round? 5. What are the odds of getting in–how many students did they take off their waitlist in the past? In Spite of the Odds, You Still Want To Remain on their Waitlist? Here’s what to do: • Update your profile adding positive events from your senior year like: an updated transcript, awards, research projects, graded paper, published articles, outstanding achievements, athletic accolades, and new leadership roles. • Return a letter indicating you are interested in remaining on their waitlist and press your point on how much you can contribute to the fabric of their freshmen class. • Meet their deadlines including completing all financial aid documents and medical requirements. • Look at your list of acceptances and make a deposit to secure your dorm to your second choice college. If you do get accepted off the waitlist, send a letter to this college withdrawing your acceptance. You will lose your deposit. • Be ready to deposit to your waitlisted college and remember it may take until after the May 1st deadline before you hear from your waitlisted college. Are you the kind of person who can make a major life decision at the last moment?

Stephenie LeePresident/Educational ConsultantLee Academia

How can you get in off the wait list?

A deferred application is considered again along with the applications submitted during the regular cycle. This complex alternative is so tenuous and uncertain that it is impossible to predict the outcome. If you find yourself in this limbo, here are some guidelines for how to proceed. 1. Don’t Panic. Remain calm. Most likely, if you’ve been deferred your credentials are in the ballpark for getting accepted. If they weren’t, you’d be rejected. So that’s the good news. The percentages vary from college to college, but some students do get accepted after being deferred. 2. Find Out Why You Were Deferred Unless the college asks you not to do so, give the admissions office a call and try to find out why you were deferred. Be polite and positive when making this call. Try to convey your enthusiasm for the college, and see if there were particular weaknesses in your application that you might be able to address. Practice before you make this call to the college’s admissions office. 3. School Guidance Counselor Your high school counselor can find out some information from the college admissions for you. 4. Be positive and Be Polite As you try to get out of deferral limbo, you’re likely to correspond with the admissions office several times. Try to keep your frustration, disappointment and anger in check. Be polite. Be positive. Admissions officers are remarkably busy this time of year, and their time is limited. Thank them for any time they give you. 5. Send a New Letter of Recommendation Is there someone who knows you well who can really promote you effectively? If so, an additional letter of recommendation might be a good idea (but make sure the college allows extra letters). Ideally, this letter should talk about the specific personal qualities that make you an ideal match for the particular college that has deferred you. 6. Send Supplemental Materials Many applications, including the Common Application, provide the opportunity for sending in supplemental materials. Try not to overwhelm the admissions office, but you should feel free to send in writing or other materials that will show the full breadth of what you can contribute to the campus community. 7. Update Your Information Chances are the college will ask for your midyear grades. If you were deferred because of a marginal GPA, the college will want to see that your grades are on an upward trend. Also, think about other information that might be worth sending: New and improved SAT or ACT scores Membership in a new extracurricular activity A new leadership position in a group or team A new honor or award 8. Have a Back-Up College or two While many deferred students do get accepted during regular admissions, many do not. You should do all you can to get into your top choice school, but you should also be realistic. Make sure you have applied to a range of reach, match and safety colleges so that you will have other options should you get a rejection letter from your first choice. 9. Letters If you have been deferred but have new information to present to the college, you’ll want to write a letter presenting the updates. Remember, the advice above is general and that every college and university has its own policies when it comes to sending in additional documents. Check with your college.

Reecy ArestyCollege Admissions/Financial Aid Expert & AuthorPayless For College, Inc.

How can you get in off the wait list?

Yes, but it takes tenacity and a superior appeal letter. In some cases a personal visit to appeal in person & speak w/whoever sent you the letter.

Reecy ArestyCollege Admissions/Financial Aid Expert & AuthorPayless For College, Inc.

How can you get in off the wait list?

Previous asked but…

Yes, but it takes tenacity and a superior appeal letter. In some cases a personal visit to appeal in person & speak w/whoever sent you the letter.

Ted SkowronCounselorBrophy College Preparatory

How can you get in off the wait list?

If you really want to attend the school, ask your Counselor to call the institution on your behalf. You should also follow up with a call to admissions and let the admission rep know of your intent to attend that school. I would also recommend that you ask whether they could share information regarding the “wait list” from last year, I.e. How many students got off it, etc. This may help you to get a realistic sense of where you stand.

Patty Finer

How can you get in off the wait list?

There is some confusion from students and their families who had their applications “deferred” in the early round and unclear about what to do going forward. If you are a senior with this problem here is a deferral plan we on how to appraoch these issues beginning in December when students hear from early admissions colleges and universities.
If you have been deferred from your early school, take a deep breath and take action as you must be proactive. If you simply do nothing, chances are you will not get in.

Here is a plan of action you can take.:
January

Focus on your grades! The biggest reason for a deferral is mediocre grades senior fall – cut out your extras and focus on GRADES. All A’s will help.
Retake the SAT or SAT Subject Tests on January 28th if that was a problem area (you can always go standby if you’ve not yet registered). If you don’t do better, just don’t send the new scores and no one will see them. If you do better, RUSH them to all your schools.
Are there any awards or competitions awards or competitions you can enter or have won and not yet reported to the college? Any concrete accomplishment will be brought up down the line.
Have you followed up with any professors at the college that you had spoken to? Let them know your plight and enlist their help.
Call (or email) the admissions office a few days after you receive the deferral letter and speak with your admissions officer – the person who covers your area or who you interviewed with or if you are a minority student, the minority representative. Tell him or her how disappointed you are, how much you like the school, and ask what else you can do. LISTEN to any clues he or she might give you in the conversation. It’s important YOU make this call NOT your parents. We had one student discover that by not visiting her early school she was at a disadvantage. She immediately made plans to visit.
Ask your guidance counselor to call both to support you, and to find out anything about WHY – any missing items? Tough year? Huge rise in applicants? School support is critical.
Ask a senior year teacher to write you a letter of support.
If you happen to know the headmaster/principal of your current school well, you can ask him/her to call or write on your behalf.

February
By the last week in February, you want to write a “deferral letter” stressing the following info:

Anything NEW — grades, scores, awards, prizes, etc… — Since my deferral, I … (Don’t waste space with insignificant achievements as that would only weaken your case.)
Have your school send your updated transcript including all new grades.
Any interesting extracurricular additions, achievements, etc…
Anything else that is interesting you didn’t mention elsewhere.
An impassioned paragraph on WHY the school is still your first choice – summarize and stress WHAT YOU WOULD ADD to the college campus.
Don’t forget to use the heading you used on all of your essays which includes your DOB, Name, High School and last 4 digits of your SS # (ie: xxx-xx-1234).

March
In early March, CALL again and speak to your regional admissions officer to touch base, ask if he/she got the letter, stress how it’s your first choice, and mention a few notable accomplishments (I pulled my grades up to all A’s and had the best quarter of my high school career…). You can email if they do not accept calls.
Some final advice:

If you have any strings to pull, now is the time to pull them.
While we want you to advocate for yourself, don’t become a pest. You don’t want to stalk the admission office.
Don’t let this deferral erode your confidence. Keep focused and remember that the odds these past few years have been at all time lows and you stood out enough not to be rejected.

Nancy MilneOwnerMilne Collegiate Consulting

How can you get in off the wait list?

First, contact the admissions office to see if you can learn where your application fell short. Address those issues in a letter, expressing your continued interest in the institution. If they offer interviews and you didn’t have one yet, by all means try to schedule an appointment. Quite possibly it is your transcript that is a concern; all the more reason to not slack off senior year and definitely send along your grades as soon as they are available. Whatever you do, don’t badger the admissions office, don’t stalk them on facebook, remind yourself that everything happens for a reason and this is why you applied to other schools. Good luck!

Ellen [email protected]OwnerEllen Richards Admissions Consulting

How can you get in off the wait list?

“How to Get Off the Waitlist for Colleges?”
This year more than any other, waitlists are promising to be longer than the number of students admitted to a given college. Rumors about waitlisting as long as 10,000 people. So, what would a person do to get on a waitlist, especially if it’s their first choice school?
The first thing that they can do is to call in any connections that they have at a particular school. For example, if a student has interviewed at that school, now is the time to contact the interviewer and remind that – first tell the interviewer how excited they are about the possible idea of attending the school. If the student has taken any summer courses or has taken any other courses with professors at the school, now is the time to get in contact with them. If the student happens to know any alumnus of the school very well who agree that you’re a good fit for them, that is another avenue for finding a way off the waitlist.
We hear a lot lately about “demonstrated interests”. This phrase cannot be underestimated at all. Demonstrated interest is one of the major factors college admissions officers take into consideration when choosing their class. Clearly, they want to choose students who they know want to go to their school. The more interest you show, the more likely it is that you move up on the waitlist. You could keep in mind that waitlists are not ordered so you don’t move up or down a waitlist, depending on where you are on it, rather a student can randomly be taken from the waitlist just for any given reason.
If any of this sounds too impossible to overcome or to accomplish, then it’s always a good idea to take a second look at some of those schools that may have been first choice had things gone little differently when you’re making your decisions about where to go to college. There is a school for everyone, there is a college for everyone and rarely are students ever upset about the school they end up attending. So, keep your chin high and hope for the best and know as with everything else in life that it will work out. Perhaps this will be one of your first life lesson in how to cope with finding your way when you’re not sure how to get there.

Ellen [email protected]OwnerEllen Richards Admissions Consulting

How can you get in off the wait list?

This year more than any other, waitlists are promising to be longer than the number of students admitted to a given college. Rumors about waitlisting as long as 10,000 people. So, what would a person do to get on a waitlist, especially if it’s their first choice school?
The first thing that they can do is to call in any connections that they have at a particular school. For example, if a student has interviewed at that school, now is the time to contact the interviewer and remind that – first tell the interviewer how excited they are about the possible idea of attending the school. If the student has taken any summer courses or has taken any other courses with professors at the school, now is the time to get in contact with them. If the student happens to know any alumnus of the school very well who agree that you’re a good fit for them, that is another avenue for finding a way off the waitlist.
We hear a lot lately about “demonstrated interests”. This phrase cannot be underestimated at all. Demonstrated interest is one of the major factors college admissions officers take into consideration when choosing their class. Clearly, they want to choose students who they know want to go to their school. The more interest you show, the more likely it is that you move up on the waitlist. You could keep in mind that waitlists are not ordered so you don’t move up or down a waitlist, depending on where you are on it, rather a student can randomly be taken from the waitlist just for any given reason.
If any of this sounds too impossible to overcome or to accomplish, then it’s always a good idea to take a second look at some of those schools that may have been first choice had things gone little differently when you’re making your decisions about where to go to college. There is a school for everyone, there is a college for everyone and rarely are students ever upset about the school they end up attending. So, keep your chin high and hope for the best and know as with everything else in life that it will work out. Perhaps this will be one of your first life lesson in how to cope with finding your way when you’re not sure how to get there.

Rebecca JosephExecutive Director & Foundergetmetocollege.org

How can you get in off the wait list?

Wait, wait, wait. Be patient as you may not hear until the day before school starts. First of all, select a college to attend from the list of colleges that already accepted you. You should have great choices that are much better than the school that waitlisted you. Second, recognize that most colleges only take 10% or less off of their waitlists so don’t take it personally if you don’t get in. THERE ARE SOME THINGS YOU CAN DO TO INCREASE YOUR ODDS. 1. Write an updated email to the admissions office. Tell them about new and exciting things have happened to you since you applied. Highlight academic achievements, awards, and accomplishments. 2. Ask a senior year teacher to write you an additional letter of recommendation. 3. Visit again, if you have the time–Ideally after May 1, when admissions officers are now looking to waitlists. 4 Have your counselor contact the admissions office. 5. DON’T BE A PEST DON’T EVER HAVE YOUR PARENTS MAKE ANY OF THESE CONTACTS. Recognize, that colleges often take students who can pay outright and other students that meet regional or specific academic needs.

Brittany MaschalFounder/DirectorB. Maschal Educational Consulting

How can you get in off the wait list?

Be proactive! Although it is common knowledge that not many people get in after being deferred or waitlisted, it is not impossible. First you should have your high school counselor call and see if they can get any info s to why this was the decision that was made. They should also advocate for you throughout this process, sending updated grades and other accolades or updates from teachers as applicable. They need to be making these calls! Students should also write an update letter – deferral or waitlist letter – this letter should provide any/all updates since the time you applied in terms of academic, extracurriculars, awards/honors, anything that will ADD to your file. If you can get to campus again to show your continued interest that is also a plus!

王文君 June ScortinoPresidentIVY Counselors Network

same question

see the answers above

王文君 June ScortinoPresidentIVY Counselors Network

same question

see the answers above

Trevor CreedenDirector of College and Career CounselingDelaware County Christian School

How can you get in off the wait list?

If waitlisted, you first need to make sure your name stays on the waitlist. You need to write back to them and tell them that you would like to stay on the waitlist. Over half of a waitlist sometimes will go away because those students don’t ask to stay on it. Then it is just a matter of waiting to see when you may get a response from them that you have been accepted off the waitlist. Most of the time, when final decisions come out there are only a couple SAT tests left to take. If your SAT scores are what are keeping you on a waitlist, definitely take it one more time to see if you can bring your score up. Sending them an additional letter and final grades (if they were good) may help but make sure you remind them once a week that you want to stay on it and their school is on the top of your list.

Trevor CreedenDirector of College and Career CounselingDelaware County Christian School

How can you get in off the wait list?

If waitlisted, you first need to make sure your name stays on the waitlist. You need to write back to them and tell them that you would like to stay on the waitlist. Over half of a waitlist sometimes will go away because those students don’t ask to stay on it. Then it is just a matter of waiting to see when you may get a response from them that you have been accepted off the waitlist. Most of the time, when final decisions come out there are only a couple SAT tests left to take. If your SAT scores are what are keeping you on a waitlist, definitely take it one more time to see if you can bring your score up. Sending them an additional letter and final grades (if they were good) may help but make sure you remind them once a week that you want to stay on it and their school is on the top of your list.

Sarah ContomichalosManagerEducational Advisory Services, LLC

How can you get in off the wait list?

Follow the directions from the college on how to stay on the waitlist. Write a letter to admissions telling them that you will come if admitted. Only write such a letter if it is true.

Bill PrudenHead of Upper School, College CounselorRavenscroft School

Getting Off the Waitlist: It is About Institutional Needs

Waitlists can be tricky. Some schools use them extensively, regularly going to the list to complete their class. However there are others that know their yields well, seldom take candidates from the list, and generally use it only as an alternative to denial for political or alumni related reasons. If a school goes to the waitlist, their choices are usually based on what needs they must fill in the incoming class. For example, if when all the dust has settled and the school sees they have five spots available and but do not yet have someone from a particular state, given their desire to be fully represented geographically, they will see if they have a waitlist candidate from that as yet unrepresented state. And so it goes. In the end there really is not much an applicant can once on the waitlist beyond making sure the school knows that you want to be a part of their community.

Annie ReznikCounselor/CEOCollege Guidance Coach

Wait List Admission Based Soley On Insitutional Needs

Determinations about wait list activity are driven solely by the needs of an individual institution. Wait list activity varies wildly because both the timing and number of wait list admissions depends upon enrollment decisions made by admitted students. Wait lists enable enrollment managers to secure class sizes with pinpoint accuracy. From year to year, it is impossible to predict the likelihood of admission for students who have earned a position on the wait list. To put yourself in the best possible position, provide colleges with new academic information (updated grades) and a sincere expression of interest.

Helen H. ChoiOwnerAdmissions Mavens

Demonstrate Continued Interest and Cross Your Fingers

If you decide to remain on a school’s waitlist, be sure to let them know of your decision. Once you have done this, you might want to write the admissions committee a letter informing them of any new (and relevant) developments in your life. After that — the ball’s in their court, and there’s not much you can do. Don’t bake cookies and send them to the school. Don’t e-mail your regional admissions officer every day/week asking them for updates. Why? Well — bombarding admissions officers with desperate-sounding emails and baked goods just don’t work. Remember that application that you sent off in the winter? THAT’S what they’ll be looking at if they decide to re-visit your application — not your scary emails and double fudge brownies!

Helen H. ChoiOwnerAdmissions Mavens

Demonstrate Continued Interest and Cross Your Fingers

If you decide to remain on a school’s waitlist, be sure to let them know of your decision. Once you have done this, you might want to write the admissions committee a letter informing them of any new (and relevant) developments in your life. After that — the ball’s in their court, and there’s not much you can do. Don’t bake cookies and send them to the school. Don’t e-mail your regional admissions officer every day/week asking them for updates. Why? Well — bombarding admissions officers with desperate-sounding emails and baked goods just don’t work. Remember that application that you sent off in the winter? THAT’S what they’ll be looking at if they decide to re-visit your application — not your scary emails and double fudge brownies!

Laura O’Brien GatzionisFounderEducational Advisory Services

Suggestions for moving up from the waitlist

If your first choice college has wait listed you, you need to write the admissions office a letter and state that you definitely want to stay on the wait list. If you will attend the school if you are given the opportunity, you should say so very clearly. If you think that you will be a good addition to the campus, then explain why. If there are new achievements that you have managed during the spring of your senior year, then you should mention them. This is your last chance to add another dimension to your application. After you have sent the letter, then relax and start to discover the great things about your second choice school–and do not forget to make the deposit at that school! If you do move off the wait list then do not forget the inform the school to which you have already given your deposit that you will not be matriculating there. This will allow one of your peers to move off of that school’s wait list to take your spot!

Nina BerlerFounderunCommon Apps

Getting in Off the Waitlist

Getting in off the waitlist is difficult, but not impossible. I have seen it happen with my students. Here’s how they were successful:

First of all, make sure that the college knows that if accepted, you will attend. The way to do this is to write to them as soon as you have been waitlisted. Make it a nice communication piece and address it to both the admissions director and the rep assigned to your geographical region. (This person is easy to find; when in doubt, call the admissions office.) During the waitlist period, you may want to inform the college if there has been a significant development such as winning an academic award, getting a lead part in the play, or being named captain of a team. Do not overburden the admissions office, however.

A few years ago, one of my students was waitlisted in a top school out of town. During spring break, the student and his mom flew out to the school, toured around, and made an appearance in the admissions office. The officer with whom they spoke took notes, and a few weeks later, he was in! Not all colleges work this way; some wouldn’t know what to say if you just showed up.