How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

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How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

Reecy ArestyCollege Admissions/Financial Aid Expert & AuthorPayless For College, Inc.

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

There are many admissions experts who specialize in athletes. Seek out someone who has had a successful record and take it from there. It’s really who you know that can make the difference.

Zahir RobbCollege CounselorThe Right Fit College

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

Students can be recognized by their performance or work with agencies to promote their play. In addition, player’s will have opportunities through bigger platforms, such as tournaments and clinics to be recognized. In many cases, coaches will also assist players in the recruiting process. In today’s technology driven world, information is shared more freely and athletes can post reels on youtube or other sources to showcase talents for schools out of the area.

Mandy ReillyCounselor

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

Type your answer here

Corey FischerPresidentCollegeClarity

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

First, there is the obvious route–that you are such an outstanding player the college coaches have heard about you and are clamboring at your door. But since the students falling in this catagory are less common than people think, the usual route is to contact the coaches at the colleges you are interested in attending. Let them know of your interest and of your stats, if they want to follow up, they will. Camps are another avenue since college coaches will often go to see the talent. It is not unusual for studnets to be “seen” at one of the camps and begin getting interest from coaches as a result.

Annie ReznikCounselor/CEOCollege Guidance Coach

Coach is Key

Typically, student athletes get onto a college coach’s radar through a high school coach. Because of strict communication regulations through the NCAA, coaches have limited ability to reach out to students themselves. If you are interested in a particular program, have your coach contact that college coach. Another option is to complete the college’s Prospective Student Athlete form available online. This will ensure that the coach has all relevant information about your athletic achievements and goals. Finally, gaining eligibility early makes it easier on college coaches. Visit the NCAA Eligibility Center website to begin the process of demonstrating amateurism and academic eligibility.

Kirk McNabbOwnerHeadstart College Consulting

Prospective student athletes need to stand out among the other athletes being recruited.

You need to show coaches who you are – your academic abilities, you’re athletic abilities and your involvement in your school and community through extra-curricular activities. You have to actively, directly and personally show interest in the coach, his/her team and the college. Just posting your profile or videos and hoping a coach finds you won’t happen. If a coach hasn’t found you, shown interest or even started scouting you by your sophomore year and notified your high school or club coach that he/she is interested in you, then you aren’t being recruited. You need to be pro-actively marketing and promoting yourself to every coach, at every college within your sport. You need to make sure you have applied to the NCAA clearinghouse, started preparing for or already have taken your ACT/SAT exams so that coaches can see whether you are qualified to be accepted to their school. It is a waste of time for a potential coach to pursue you if you haven’t already done these steps in the recruiting process. All of this must get done as soon as possible and then you must frequently update your profile and keep coaches informed of any new academic, athletic or community achievements.

Kirk McNabbOwnerHeadstart College Consulting

Prospective student athletes need to stand out among the other athletes being recruited.

You need to show coaches who you are – your academic abilities, you’re athletic abilities and your involvement in your school and community through extra-curricular activities. You have to actively, directly and personally show interest in the coach, his/her team and the college. Just posting your profile or videos and hoping a coach finds you won’t happen. If a coach hasn’t found you, shown interest or even started scouting you by your sophomore year and notified your high school or club coach that he/she is interested in you, then you aren’t being recruited. You need to be pro-actively marketing and promoting yourself to every coach, at every college within your sport. You need to make sure you have applied to the NCAA clearinghouse, started preparing for or already have taken your ACT/SAT exams so that coaches can see whether you are qualified to be accepted to their school. It is a waste of time for a potential coach to pursue you if you haven’t already done these steps in the recruiting process. All of this must get done as soon as possible and then you must frequently update your profile and keep coaches informed of any new academic, athletic or community achievements.

Kirk McNabbOwnerHeadstart College Consulting

Prospective student athletes need to stand out among the other athletes being recruited.

You need to show coaches who you are – your academic abilities, you’re athletic abilities and your involvement in your school and community through extra-curricular activities. You have to actively, directly and personally show interest in the coach, his/her team and the college. Just posting your profile or videos and hoping a coach finds you won’t happen. If a coach hasn’t found you, shown interest or even started scouting you by your sophomore year and notified your high school or club coach that he/she is interested in you, then you aren’t being recruited. You need to be pro-actively marketing and promoting yourself to every coach, at every college within your sport. You need to make sure you have applied to the NCAA clearinghouse, started preparing for or already have taken your ACT/SAT exams so that coaches can see whether you are qualified to be accepted to their school. It is a waste of time for a potential coach to pursue you if you haven’t already done these steps in the recruiting process. All of this must get done as soon as possible and then you must frequently update your profile and keep coaches informed of any new academic, athletic or community achievements.

Erica WhiteCollege & Career CounselorMiddletown High School

To start…

1) Talk to your current coach about what division you may be qualified to play (Division 1, 2, or 3). 2) Talk to your school counselor about which colleges you are most likely to gain acceptance that also offer your sport and division level 3) If you plan to play Division 1 or 2 sports, you must register on the NCAA website www.eligibilitycenter.org 4) Email college coaches stating your intent to play college athletics and include: – Current sports schedule (practice and games) – Sports resume (accomplishments, statistics, etc.) – High School Transcript and SAT scores (this shows the coach that you have potential for academic acceptance into their school) – Video clips highlighting your skill levels Mind the fact that there are specific rules regarding athletic recruitment and coaches can only have a specific amount of contact with prospective athletes and this can only during certain times. One of the best books I have read on recruitement was: “The Student Athletes Guide to Getting Recruited” by Steward Brown

Bill PrudenHead of Upper School, College CounselorRavenscroft School

Want to Play In College? Recruit the School

Often times–especially in the non-revenue sports–the athlete has to recruit the school. While major football and basketball programs have big recruiting budgets, most sports and schools have limited resources so it is important that the athlete let a school that they are interested in know of that interest. Go to camps and showcases. Send letters and film. In sports like track and swimming, where the performances are measureable–the stopwatch and tape measure do not lie–you can see on the school website if you are at their level and if so, let them know of your interest. Don’t wait for them to make the first contact. There are lots of teams out there and they all want full rosters, but especially in the non-revenue sports it is more about making them aware of you than it is sitting back and waiting to hear from a school. Go after it.

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Be Appropriately Aggressive

I attended a very small high school that didn’t get much attention from NCAA Division I colleges. That said, I was a good runner and had the skill and work-ethic to compete on a NCAA Division I varsity team. In this case, I had to do some self-promotion by contacting coaches at universities I was interested in attending to see if they would be willing to meet with me and check out my stats. I ended up walking on at a NCAA Division I cross country team and earning a varsity letter. That said, some students get recruited because they are truly outstanding athletes or their schools are known for producing superior athletes. If you are not an absolute top-notch athlete, yet still successful, however, you may have to do some self-promotion. When you do, be appropriately aggressive while still remaining humble and respectful. Sincerely, Mike Chapman, Owner Chapman College Admission Consulting www.chapmancac.com

Judy ZoddaFounder and PresidentZodda College Services

Prospective student athletes – getting recruited

Before you begin….you are going to college for an education first and foremost. Playing your sport in college is an adjunct to that experience. Should you sustain a career ending injury, you still need to love the college you’re attending. You’re looking for the right academic/athletic match! If you’re a top athlete in your sport and have had state, regional and national exposure in your sport, be it basketball, soccer, football or whatever your sport is, it’s likely that you’ve been noticed by coaches who are attending those tournaments. However, even those students who get noticed and followed over a period of years, not all of them end up playing in Division I or Division II schools. Only a very small percentage of all high school varsity athletes across all sports will ever play at the Division I or Division II level, approximately 1-2%. When you include those students who also play at Division III schools, you are still only talking about a total of about 3-4% for all three divisiions, but don’t get discouraged by the numbers.. If you think you might be a Division I or II player, (your current coaches from your club, AAU, Babe Ruth, or Junior teams might have mentioned that you might be of this caliber), you should start contacting coaches in your sophomore year to express your interest. (More about how, later) But don’t expect to hear back! Coaches can’t respond to you or any prospects in any way until you start your junior year, and then not even by phone..On September 1 of your junior year, they can send written correspondece about their athletic program, a brochure, email, text messages,IM or fax. As a prospective student-athlete, you should also register with the NCAA Student Eligiblity Center at the start of your junior year. Only DI and DII prospective student – athletes are eligible for athletic scholarlships, except those playing for the Ivy League! DIII student – student athletes are also not elligible for athletic scholarships. For DI and DII prospective student – athletes, you’ll need to send in an official copy of your high school transcript and your SAT scores when you get them back later in your junior year. There is also a form to send in that states your amateur status as an athlete. Even though DI and DII coaches might know who you are, they are not officially allowed to directly contact you by phone until July 1 between your junior and senior year of high school, with a few exceptions noted below. However, that doesn’t mean that you can’t contact them. The same can be said of Division III coaches, with these exceptions. You don’t need to register with the NCAA Student Eligibility Center for Division III. DIII coaches also don’t have the money in their budgets to attend all of the tournaments, meets, etc they would like to, so they can’t follow student – athletes to keep track of their development in their sport as they would like. So, DIII athletes almost need to do the recruting of the coaches and schools they are interested in. They can’t directly contact you by phone, but you can contact them and they are allowed to respond to you by mail or email (but not until the start of junior year)! A good way for any student-athlete to get started is to fill out the “Recruit Me” form that is usually on the athletic site of the school. There is usually a form for each sport. Following that, it’s a good idea to put together an athletic resume that includes your name, address, and other contact information, academic credentials including any standardized tests that you’ve taken, coursework completed or in progress, your GPA,and then your athletic credentials (teams you’ve played on and dates, position(s) you play, tournaments and results, individual recognition such as MVP, coaches names and their contact information, etc. This should be preceded with an introductory letter that states your interest in the college and playing for their team. Each time you have any new news to report, you should contact each coach by email to keep him/her informed. You are allowed to go on as many “unofficial” visits as you want. “Unofficial” visits are those visits where no costs incurred by the student to visit are paid for by the unviersity. Only DI and DII schools are allowed to pay for official visits on or after September 1 of the senior year. DIII schools can invite ahtletes on official visits, but cannot pay any of their expenses. On your visits prospective student – athletes should talk to the coaches about their program, if they might be needing someone in your position/event, the number of hours/week that are spent in practice on the field, breaking down game tape, lifting weights, hours both in and out of season, whether athletes live together or with the general student body, a tour of the facilities, whether there are tutors to help if travel is required and you miss class and a whole host of other types of issues that affect student-athletes both in and out of the classroom. It’s also a good idea to have a videotape that shows a few highlights, but also 15-20 minutes of continuous play if you are a soccer player, football player, etc. Coaches want to see what you do well, but they also want to see how you recover from your mistakes on the filed or what your weaknesses are. PAY ATTENTION TO THE RULES: THEY ARE COMPLICATED Division I After July 1 between junior and senior year, coaches in DI can call student athletes directly with the following exceptions: A football prospect can receive one phone call in May of junior year from any institution. A men’s basketball player can receive one phone call/month from June 15th prior to his junior year until June 30th prior to his senior year. Starting July 1 of his senior year, he can receive one weekly call. A women’s basketball player can receive one phone call in April and one phone call in May of junior year. DIVISION II A coach can call on June 15 prior to senior year. DIVISION III: A coach can call immediately after the completion of the prospective student- athlete’s junior year. Of course, I haven’t covered the National Letter of Intent and many other considerations and rules. It’s impossible to cover over 450 pages of rules just for Division I here, let alone the other two divisions, but you’ve got the basics! Get going!

Ryan JohnSchool CounselorBethlehem High School

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

Travel teams, showcase tournaments and high school games (particularly during sectional and/or playoff play) can be great opportunities for student athletes to get recognized by college recruiters. Student athletes can also create a video compilation of their accomplishments and highlights of their athletic careers and send them to colleges/universities that they may be interested in, or who have demonstrated any level of interest in them. Students can send letters of interest along with athletic schedules to prospective college coaches.

kathy hicks-freemanGuidance CounselorGreensboro High School

Sports Recruitment

Recruitment mainly the collaboration between high school and college coaches. Many recruiters visit games or invite students to various camps to see them in action. Students also send video tappings of games that display their talents. Another option is a “walk on”. This means the student would appear for tryouts for possible recruitment.

Trevor CreedenDirector of College and Career CounselingDelaware County Christian School

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

You can do one of three things: 1) Put together a video, type up a resume, athletic recruiting profile and a cover letter and send these to as many college coaches as you want. I have seen kids send a package to 10 colleges and and 50 colleges. 2) Pay a company to so the work for you but this obviously will cost a good amount of money on the front end, but they do all the work. One company that I recommend and has a great reputation is NCSA. 3) Pray and hope coaches come knocking on your door. This is obviously not the technique I would recommend, but some decide to do this. 4) The last thing I would recommend would be to attend a camp during the summer’s before your sophomore and junior year at the colleges you are most interested in. The coaches for the college will always be hosting this event and the coach is the one you want to get noticed by.

Trevor CreedenDirector of College and Career CounselingDelaware County Christian School

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

You can do one of three things: 1) Put together a video, type up a resume, athletic recruiting profile and a cover letter and send these to as many college coaches as you want. I have seen kids send a package to 10 colleges and and 50 colleges. 2) Pay a company to so the work for you but this obviously will cost a good amount of money on the front end, but they do all the work. One company that I recommend and has a great reputation is NCSA. 3) Pray and hope coaches come knocking on your door. This is obviously not the technique I would recommend, but some decide to do this. 4) The last thing I would recommend would be to attend a camp during the summer’s before your sophomore and junior year at the colleges you are most interested in. The coaches for the college will always be hosting this event and the coach is the one you want to get noticed by. 5) Lastly, get good grades! Grades can play a huge factor in whether you get recruited or not.

Pamela Hampton-GarlandOwnerScholar Bound

Student Athletes and Recruitment

There are very specific guidelines for student athlethe and it is belt that you download the manual from the www.ncsasports.org to be preprepared and well versed in what the expectations are for hgh school athletes and recruitment.

Joe OraveczSenior Student Affairs OfficerLocated in Nebraska

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

It depends on what Division school is doing the recruiting (I, II, or III)? Division I schools, for the most part, are scouting out key high schools they have recruited from in the past, as well as taking references from former student-athletes who are now coaches are high schools. Coaches will also visit homes. DII schools usually do less of the initial above, and more of the latter, as well as looking at submitted video from prospective players. During on-campus visits, coaches will visit with potential players. Coaches will also go to homes. DIII – remember here – this is the least funded program of all the Divisions. So, going places to recruit is very limited and intentional. No scholarship $$ here for players – so you are the “true student-athlete” playing for the love of the game, understanding you will not be having any (or very few) scouts looking at you during your playing years in college.

Sarah ContomichalosManagerEducational Advisory Services, LLC

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

Prospective student athletes need to be in contact with the coaches of the schools they have targeted. The process starts early and is strictly governed by the NCAA.org eligibility rules both in terms of academic requirement and rules of contact between coaches and student athletes.. By the end of junior year, student athletes should register with the NCAA. During summers, student athletes should attend player identification clinics and also create a website with their stats. For some sports, such as swimming or crew, a player’s stats are a good start while for others such as soccer, the coach may need to see game footage or better yet a live game.

IRMA TORRES

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

YOU HAVE TO BE VERY ACTIVE IN THE SEARCH FOR COLLEGES LOOKING FOR ATHLETES. WHERE WILL THEY BE AND PREPARE PROPERLY FOR A GOOD IMPRESSION. ASK COACHES TO GUIDE YOU TO WHERE TO LOOK FOR THESE OPORTUNITIES. GET PLENTY OF REST AT LEAST 24 HOURS BEFORE THE TRY OUT AND HIDRATE.

IRMA TORRES

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

YOU HAVE TO BE VERY ACTIVE IN THE SEARCH FOR COLLEGES LOOKING FOR ATHLETES. WHERE WILL THEY BE AND PREPARE PROPERLY FOR A GOOD IMPRESSION. ASK COACHES TO GUIDE YOU TO WHERE TO LOOK FOR THESE OPORTUNITIES. GET PLENTY OF REST AT LEAST 24 HOURS BEFORE THE TRY OUT AND HIDRATE.

Reecy ArestyCollege Admissions/Financial Aid Expert & AuthorPayless For College, Inc.

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

First, they have to be in the NCAA Clearinghouse to get athletic scholarship offers. There are many admissions experts who specialize in athletes. Seek out someone who has had a successful record and take it from there. It’s really who you know that can make the difference.

Scott Herrmann-KeelingCollege Counselor

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

Most begin by talking to their coaches. Telling your coach you want to play your sport in college is the most important step you can take. An experienced coach who has seen other student athletes go on to similar outcomes has a blueprint you can follow. He or she may also have contacts at the college level who can help. It’s important for you to get noticed by college coaches. This can happen in a number of ways. You should make contact with coaches at particular schools as soon as you know you’re interested in their programs. Compose a brief, introductory email about yourself, your athletic accomplishments, and why you’re interested in a particular school and send to the coach and/or recruitment coordinator (you can usually find the appropriate email address on the school’s website). Many programs also have online prospect forms you can fill out. These will give you some idea of what information the coaches are looking for, as well. Unless you’re an athlete in a sport like swimming or track, where times, distances, heights, and numbers are used to measure success, most coaches will eventually want to see you play. Some coaches will be content to watch a video, others will prefer to evaulate you in person. Letting coaches know your schedule can help ensure they keep an eye open for you if they’re going to be at a game or tournament you expect to be playing in. Telling your current coach of your interest can help with this as well. If your coach has access to video equipment, you may be able to use it to tape your games.

Joyce Vining MorganFounder and college counselorEducational Transitions

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

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Richard NaporaCollege ConsultantClarus

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

Coaches generally cannot recruit student athletes until the end of the students’ junior year…so the key is to follow a timeline. Plan yoir high school schedule to ensure that you have not only time to develop and hone your athletic skills but also to take a rigorous course load that will satisfy the NCAA Clearinghouse required course sequence. Research potential colleges for whom you might wish to play, and prepare footage of your skills in a format that coaches can easily review (dvd/web clips) that showcase the elements that set you apart from other prospective athletes. Coaches look for not only athletic talent but also a player’s ability to lead and perform as a cihesive member of a team. Although coaches cannot actively recruit you until late in the junior year, you can create a list and send materials to them (game footage/a letter of interest/stat sheet), and follow up accordingly. You should sign up for the NCAA Clearinghouse, which will allow you to keep track of your coursework and deadlines. Ultimately, the key to your search is carefully researching schools that are a good fit for your particular talents that also offer the academic experience you seek. Your high school coach can be a key part of the equation, because he or she will often not only be able to realistically access your potential for various college programs but also make inroads with various coaches at the college level when the time is appropriate. Overall, the key to getting noticed is to get information to the appropriate sources at the appropriate times…because unless you are one of the rare few ultimate athletes out there who EVERYONE seems to know about already, marketing yourself, with the help of your coach, parents, counselor, and anyone else who has connections, is a great way to get noticed.

Patricia YoungIndependent CounselorCollege Advising Services

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

Prospective college athletes get noticed and recruited in many ways. Some are recommended by their coaches. Some get noticed in local newspaper articles. Some get attention by college alumni who in turn contact the college. It is ok to contact the Athletic Department of a favored school yourself to ask the procedure to contact a coach. Athletic Departments’ budgets are not what they used to be; so there is reduced outreach by coaches. Be polite; be prepared to document your skills, and you may find yourself a recruited athlete

Tony TsoHeadmasterTerasmanna Oikademy

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

I have no expertise in the athletics arena.

Ellen Fitzkee

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

A prospect by definition is a ninth grader in high school. A prospect can attend summer “high exposure” camps as well as “play days” where college coaches will evaluate talent during specific times throughout the academic year. If a college coach likes what he or she sees during one of these events, they will mail a letter to the prospect introducing them to their school and send them information periodically throughout their high school career. If a student is actually recruited from this process, many times the coach will make contact with the prospect’s high school or AAU coach to let them know of their interest since they cannot speak directly to a prospect until the summer before the senior year. The prospect can go to a campus and speak with a coach anytime in their high school years that is not a “dead period” by NCAA rules. The summer before a prospect’s senior year, the coaches can begin calling the student according to their sports individual NCAA guidelines to get better acquainted and the athletes that are highly recruited then can visit the campus “officially” and the process continues until the actual signing of the National Letter of Intent. Sports like football, basketball, lacrosse offer full athletic sscholarships for Division I and II schools while Division III schools do not offer scholarships based solely on athletics. For the other 95% of students that will play sports in college, the student recruits the school and gets the coach interested in them. Many times a coach will not know about a prospect because they are not in the top 500 in a sport. It’s the students reponsibility to make contact and sell themselves. Finding out what each coach needs to evaluate and to see whether or not the student is a good fit in their program is an important step. For this reason, high school sophomores/juniors need to get busy and research colleges and athletic programs. Beginning the process early will allow a student-athlete the opportunity to find a place where they may be able to compete and feel comfortable. There is a NCAA guide to help students and parents navigate the recruiting process that is available online.

Mo NolanOwnerChris Counseling Services

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Mo NolanOwnerChris Counseling Services

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Richard NaporaCollege ConsultantClarus

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

Coaches generally cannot recruit student athletes until the end of the students’ junior year…so the key is to follow a timeline. Plan yoir high school schedule to ensure that you have not only time to develop and hone your athletic skills but also to take a rigorous course load that will satisfy the NCAA Clearinghouse required course sequence. Research potential colleges for whom you might wish to play, and prepare footage of your skills in a format that coaches can easily review (dvd/web clips) that showcase the elements that set you apart from other prospective athletes. Coaches look for not only athletic talent but also a player’s ability to lead and perform as a cohesive member of a team. Although coaches cannot actively recruit you until late in the junior year, you can create a list and send materials to them (game footage/a letter of interest/stat sheet), and follow up accordingly. You should sign up for the NCAA Clearinghouse, which will allow you to keep track of your coursework and deadlines. Ultimately, the key to your search is carefully researching schools that are a good fit for your particular talents that also offer the academic experience you seek. Your high school coach can be a key part of the equation, because he or she will often not only be able to realistically access your potential for various college programs but also make inroads with various coaches at the college level when the time is appropriate. Overall, the key to getting noticed is to get information to the appropriate sources at the appropriate times…because unless you are one of the rare few ultimate athletes out there who EVERYONE seems to know about already, marketing yourself, with the help of your coach, parents, counselor, and anyone else who has connections, is a great way to get noticed.

Patricia AviezerPresidentInside Track To College, Inc.

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

Are You ON Their Radar? Sports are all about the competition, and the recruiting process is no exception. Know the rules in advance and learn more about which college coaches are really looking for your talents. In most sports, your junior year is the fist time a NCAA coach should be in contact with you. How do you know if you are on their recruiting lists? You might have received a questionairre as a freshman or sophomore to complete. During your junior year the coach can send you a recruiting brochure. If a coach has sent a questionnaire or a recruiting brochure before the end of your junior year, then you are on that coach’s radar screen. Want to know more about the recruiting process? Become familiar with the NCAA.org site and start with this article: http://www.ncaa.org/wps/wcm/connect/public/ncaa/issues/recruiting+overview

Frank DonPartnerEast West College Counseling LLP

Comprehensive vs Specialized

There are several ways by which you can get recruited for your sport. Coaches scout out high school talent. But it also makes great sense, if you are a standout in your sport, to bang the drum loudly. You can do so by meeting with the coach of your particular sport at the college[s] you are interested in, telling the coach what you have done in your high school sport career, and even better showing any press clippings from your local community’s newspaper or school newspaper.

Joan CaseyPresidentEducational Advocates College Consulting Corp.

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

While the very best athletes might begin contacting coaches as early as freshmen and sophomore years, junior year is an ideal time for most athletes to contact college coaches. Start by completing the athletic recruitment form on the college website for the sport of interest. Then send the coach an email expressing interest and providing SAT/ACT scores, GPA, and a brief athletic background. Video of a student playing the sport (emailed or posted on a web link) can be a nice introduction and may be a potential motivator for a member of the coaching staff to get out to see the player perform. No coach will put a prospective athlete on a roster without seeing the athlete in a contest (or seeing official times). Therefore students should send coaches a list of athletic contests in which they will appear. Keep the coach informed and develop a rapport.

Alan Duesterhaus

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

In order to get recruited you need to get the attention of the coach. For many of you this will entail you completing an online interest form at the college’s website. From there the coach should make some type of contact indicating receipt of your form. If you are really interested in the college go ahead and contact the coach to set up a time to meet. Be prepared to provide information on how you can contribute to the team. The NCAA has a recruitment website that you will need to register on if you are interested in Division I or II colleges. There are also a number of private organizations and websites that are designed to assist you in getting recruited. One example is http://www.getmynameout.com. You will need to weigh their costs against their past success as well as an honest assessment of your competitive level. The reality for most student athletes is that they will need to promote themselves and get on the radar of at least a few coaches at colleges where they can make an impact in order to become recruited. Keep working out and show how you can contribute!

Mr C CoakleyPresidentAcademic Coaching Services

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

Recruiting varies greatly by sport. I can only offer these “brief” tips in this forum. If you are involved with club/team sports that have frequent tournaments, you’ll probably be seen by coaches and recruiters attending (i.e. swimming, soccer, wrestling, etc.). Initially, most students send their player profile to a prospective coach or the recruiting coordinator (usually an assistant coach). Potential college athletes (current high school students) are permitted to contact college coaches anytime, while there are limitations on when a college coach can speak to a high school student. My suggestion is to call or email a coach, mail in a player profile/resume and one’s tournament or play schedule, visit the college–admissions office and athletic facilities, and submit videos when asked. This is usually enough to begin the process. Once a college coach is interested, he will contact the prospective student’s coach and secure more information. Of course, an athlete’s on-field/turf/court performance (andachievement) is the surest way in which to be recruited; success inspires interest, so do well.

Claire Law

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

For some sports like ice hockey, it starts very early one, as early at in 9th grade. Generally, students get recruited by playing games on their high school varsity teams, at exhibition games, training camps, and by participating in state and national competitions. Many students rise to the top organically because they are so incredibly good at their sport. Many can use the help of a coach who is willing to present them to college coaches. Some educational consultants such as me have experience combining the student’s academic abilities with the athletic interests and in placing these student- athletes in colleges where they can grow and thrive both educationally and athletically.

Patty Finer

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

The first way students get recruited is by doing well in their sport so that College Scouts recognize them in their sophomore and junior years, having them sign letters of intent by the end of their junior year or beginning of their senior year. Unfortunately, that happens to only a select few. So what about the rest. This is where a well trained counselor comes in….. listening to, and helping students establish a list of schools that will meet their needs and then determining if the school meets the financial considerations required. This is important because if a student wants to go to UC Santa Cruz to play baseball from New York but is looking for a financial aid package to supplement his $60,000 a year tuition, this is not going to be a fit because UC Santa Cruz is a Division III school, where no scholarship funds are awarded to athletes.

Ryan AldrichDirector of College CounselingThe White Mountain School

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

Students can become recruited by coaches after they have filed with the NCAA Clearing House for Div 1 and II. Students can fill out inquiry forms online and contact coaches to indicate interest. Students can ask their current coaches to contact college coaches. Prospective athletes can make video’s and resume’s to submit to coaches.

Kathleen HarringtonOwnerNew Jersey College Consulting

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

Get to Know This Website: beRecruited.com is an amazing resource for student athletes throughout the country who are interested in pursuing athletics in either a D1, D2, or D3 school. Both male and female student athletes can market themselves by uploading their athletic highlight films and creating an athletic profile to showcase their talent. Showcase Time: Take advantage of club teams or showcases happening in your area. Talk with your high school or club team coach about learning more about the available athletic opportunities that will have college recruiters in attendance. Network: Email the coach at your interested college and introduce yourself and discuss your potential interest in participating in athletics at their college.

Renee Boone

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

On most college websites, at the athletic page, there is a recruitment form that a prospective athlete can fill out. These notify the college of your interest and make it easy for the athletic department to consider and contact you. On the Common App, there is an Athletic Supplement. By completing and submitting this form, colleges to which you are applying can identify you as a potential Varsity athlete. Of course, high school and club coaches have long taken an interest in their best athletes and will often offer to put in a good word to their college contacts. You must also visit the NCAA website and register with their Clearinghouse in order to play an NCAA sport in college. Other ways of being recruited include specialty camps, but some are prohibitively expensive and are not necessary to ensure that you are seen by college coaches.

Mitch ClarkExecutive DirectorCollege Sherpa

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

The most important aspect of college recruiting is for the student to initiate contact with the coaches and the schools they are interested in. Coaches look for initiative in athletes and level of interest in the school. The first step is always to fill out the interest survey on the school’s athletic website. Depending on your year in high school, you may only receive a standard email response because, by NCAA rules, coaches aren’t allowed to provide more than general information generally before the junior year. The second step is continue feeding the coach information about how you’re doing in the sport (updated stats, recognitions, camps). Periodically send emails, letters, links to video that show you at your best in your sport. Especially let them know if you’re playing in a showcase event where they can see you in action.

Randi HeathmanIndependent Educational ConsultantThe Equestrian College Advisor LLC

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

For equestrian athletes, the recruitment process can really vary widely depending on the school and the program. The best thing prospective collegiate equestrians can do is to investigate their potential schools for their academic program FIRST (because you’ll need to go to classes too while you’re there!) and then, once you’ve identified several that look like they’ll be a good fit, investigate their equestrian program/teams. For equestrian teams that are student-run as a campus club or organization, the easiest way to track down the information (if it isn’t readily available on the school web site) is to do a quick Google search for “Specific Universty Equestrian,” which will either lead you to a club web or Facebook page or the riding facility where the team trains. From there, you can contact either the student team captain or the coach directly and ask him or her about the recruitment process, team tryouts, etc.

Benjamin Waldmann

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

This very much depends upon your own circumstances and how your sport fits in with your overall academic expectancies. Remember, you are playing your sport to compliment with an academic program and not the other way round. Depending upon your academic record coming out of high school and the level in which you have competed at in your sport, an important step is to start contacting coaches as suitable universities. If you are looking to be recruited at a local college then obviously contacting the head coach or assistant coaches at the specified school is the best way to get the ball rolling. This will be the same for all student’s although if you are looking to be recruited anywhere across the U.S. then start to check out NCAA, NJCAA, NAIA at the member schools for your specified sport. From here, you can start short listing which specific programs to contact. E-mailing a coach is the first step, however make sure you make a template if you are contacting several coaches but personalise that template to the specific individual that you are contacting. It is also important to put together an athletic CV with all your sporting achievements as well as academic results thus far. Work experience, and any volunteering may also help as a coach is looking for many different aspects in terms of whether your personality and character will fit with the program, therefore this type of thing will not hurt your chances of being recruited. I think that e-mail is the best initial way to contact a coach and see what his response is from there. Depending on how far you are located from the college, he/she may ask for video footage, therefore make sure you edit relevant footage which highlights specifically you ability within a short clip so that the coach can get an idea of the standard of your play. Obviously visiting a specified program is the best way as many universities will offer a general “try out” where you can really express your performance and thus better your chances of being accepted onto the program and with scholarship if thats what your looking for. Lastly, sports agencies like Athletes USA (largest global scholarship agency) have links to thousands of coaches thus give you the best ability to promote your sporting abilities however they do charge a fee but these vary depending upon the certain packages on offer to promote your abilities.

Janet Elfers

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

The way recruiment happens depends a great deal on whether the sport is one of the high-profile sports with big budgets and big scholarships, or whether the sport is a “minor” one with limited scholarships. If you’re a division I athlete, your high school coach has probably already made some contacts for you, and college coaching staffs may have already noticed you. With the minor sports, you can be more aggressive yourself. Create your sports resume of statistics, accomplishments, awards, etc., and perhaps a video of you playing or demonstrating your skills. Go ahead and email these items to coaches. They will be restricted as to when and how they can contact you, but you can certainly make yourself known to them. If the coach shows interest, tell him/her of your schedule. Coaches are permitted to watch you in a competition.

Nina ScullerDirectorCollege Prep

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

Students interested in playing NCAA sports must register with the NCAA by the beginning of their junior year of high school. Students may do so by going to the NCAA http://ncaa.org/ and clicking on the eligibility button. Sports camps are often the ideal place for recruiters to scout prospective students. When looking for a summer sport camp, be specific in asking about which colleges send scouts. Students may also contact the offices of the coaches directly and send video highlights of their games to college coaches.

hossam

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

by APPLICATION , BEING ON LINE ,

Angela ConleyCollege Admission ExpertVentureForth

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

Recruited athletes are scouted early in the process, specific to their sport. I’ve known students visited for observation as early as their first year of secondary school. However, the caveat for recruitment is closely monitored by the NCAA as coaches access to prime athletes is mitigated by NCAA policy. While scouts may “pipeline” students in a specific sport early in their secondary career, few are accessible for express overt interest until they are officially registered with the NCAA. This is only necessary and essential for those hoping to participate at Divisions I or II. Typically Division III athletic participants are subject to far less exacting practices. Students, coaches or athletes who subvert the process risk participants being red-shirted or excluded from participation. See www.ncaa.org for specific information.

Robert McClorySchool Counseling Dept. HeadKetchikan High School

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

Sports are a universal pastime: some celebrated for centuries. One does not need to be set for the Olympics to want to feel connected to one sport or another. Whether you row, wrestle or play volleyball, sports are enjoyed by athletes as well as audiences. Aside from the injuries, it’s a health habit doctors will recommend for aerobic and muscular fitness. For some it’s a fun pastime. For others, it is their ticket to a scholarship of some sort and amount for college or even to the NBA, NFL or MLB. Some students are motivated by the sports to excel in school and select one as well. There is no shortage of students who found a school because of their athletic opportunities or reputations more than their educational programs. For those students, they have to do more than simply star and train for their sport. Student athletes really need not only excel in their chosen sports, but they must be discovered by scouts looking for that particular talent. Athletes must make sure their talents are spotted by scouts. Summer camps, regional and state tournaments can attract such viewers. Developing a tape of one’s skill set can help too, but athletes must insure the right person views it. They need to insure they qualify for admission requirements to the schools to which they are hoping to apply. Just like each sport has its own skill set, so too does each college want each serious candidate to meet entry requirements. Check SAT, ACT, GPA and course requirements. Log in to NCAA to insure your transcripts will meet the D-1, D-2 or D-3 schools a student wants to attend. Check course titles at your high school closely. It’s important to note the difference between recommendations and requirements. Not all schools require, for example, 3 years of a foreign language. Some require 2, but recommend 3. Likewise, many students at Stanford have perfect or near perfect SATs, but they always have a few students with average or even below average scores. That means test scores can help, but won’t necessarily keep one out of a given school. Remember to work with their admission’s office as well as their coaches to finalize all requirements. Celebrate your admission, but remember that sports are no guarantee. I know of at least one school that canceled their golf program, and all on golf scholarships lost those awards. Likewise, injury or poor school or athletic performance can cause an athlete to lose an award as well. Hopefully, you will be the athlete who gets to play your chosen sport for the college of your choice for that big scholarship. Hopefully, good academic and athletic performance will follow you all the way through to graduation. Hopefully, you can finish all your graduation requirements during the four years most awards last despite juggling intense practice and game schedules while excelling in class as well. It’s not easy, and it’s not for everyone. The opportunities are there though, and it’s worth pursuing if that’s your dream. Just don’t expect it to be easy.

Eric Beers, Ph.D.College and Career CounselorAir Academy High School

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

Students must become their own PR (public relations)-agents. College coaches are extremely busy, they don’t have a lot of time and resources to notice everybody. Students can mail/email their athletic resumes to coaches in their sophomore and/or junior year. Academics are an important part of the athletic resume. Include all awards, classes, GPA, test scores, AP and Honors classes, etc, that you can. Include postion(s) played, stats, team schedule, and a link to a youtube video if you have game video footage. Note what player number you are and the color of your jersey. Also when you are sending in a game film, film it at a wide-angle (not a zoom in of yourself), let the coach know what team you are playing and at what point in the season the game is taking place. Realize that because of NCAA rules, coaches may not be able to call you back. You can try and call them during various times during the day, and then if they just happen to pick up, you can talk to them. During your campus visits, you can always stop in and try to visit the coach then, as well.

Avi StopperCollege Sports Recruiting ExpertCaptainU – College Sports Recruiting

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

The best way to get recruiting to play a sport is to actively promoted yourself to college coaches. You can’t sit back and wait, hoping that they’ll find you. There are so many athletes out there that the likelihood of randomly being found by the right coach at the right school is pretty low. The best thing you can do is get out there and promote yourself so they know who you are and that you’re interested.

Chip LawCo-founder Managing Director Educational Avenues

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

First of all you need to know that coaches of varsity intercollegiate sports are “looking” 24/7 for the right player to play on their team. So, IF you come to their attention, you’ll be given some level of consideration. So how do prospects get on their radar screen? Many really good athletes show exceptional ability at a very early age-let’s say middle school. The parents and coaches of these gifted children often recognize these unique talents and begin to encourage the child by having them attend sport specific camps, and hiring sport and position specific coaches. Should the child continue to excel, this exposure of his or her talent will widen and other coaches, teams and people influential to a sport will often start to “track” the athlete. As the child moves into high school the exposure can increase exponentially due a number of nationally available websites that keep tabs on nearly all high school athletes showing promise for college varsity competitive sports. Sites such as rivals.com maintain incredibly detailed databases on promising high school athletes in most of the major sports. Many prep schools maintain league information that goes into detailed stats for each player (football, basketball and hockey). At this point if all has gone well the recognition of an athlete will be a natural progression: all previous exposure and success can be seen by coaches and THEY will seek out the talent that they want to recruit for their team. Students-athletes that have more modest skills can still be recruited by doing some aggressive promotion themselves. Of course they can use some of the tactics described above, but they can also make game highlight videos and create DVD’s to send to coaches of the school they think might be a fit. They can (for a substantial fee) get the videos posted on some popular “recruiting” websites so that they can showcase their ability to a broader audience by inviting a larger number coaches to the site via a link to their specific footage and stats. Having a strong supportive relationship with the high school coach is instrumental in making many of these things happen and should be considered as a top priority in getting noticed. Using their coach’s guidance and influence, these same athletes can build a network of contacts that can be effective in letting the coaching network work for them. Many amateur coaches often share information relating to specific skills or position players that may be needed in the coming season(s).

Jeana RobbinsCounselor

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

Recruiters will often approach talented athletic students. They will also contact high school coaches to learn more about the prospective college student. It’s important that coaches have game tapes made to submit to recruiters.

Chip LawCo-founder Managing Director Educational Avenues

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

First of all you need to know that coaches of varsity intercollegiate sports are “looking” 24/7 for the right player to play on their team. So, IF you come to their attention, you’ll be given some level of consideration. So how do prospects get on their radar screen? Many really good athletes show exceptional ability at a very early age-let’s say middle school. The parents and coaches of these gifted children often recognize these unique talents and begin to encourage the child by having them attend sport specific camps, and hiring sport and position specific coaches. Should the child continue to excel, this exposure of his or her talent will widen and other coaches, teams and people influential to a sport will often start to “track” the athlete. As the child moves into high school the exposure can increase exponentially due a number of nationally available websites that keep tabs on nearly all high school athletes showing promise for college varsity competitive sports. Sites such as rivals.com maintain incredibly detailed databases on promising high school athletes in most of the major sports. Many prep schools maintain league information that goes into detailed stats for each player (football, basketball and hockey). At this point if all has gone well the recognition of an athlete will be a natural progression: all previous exposure and success can be seen by coaches and THEY will seek out the talent that they want to recruit for their team. Students-athletes that have more modest skills can still be recruited by doing some aggressive promotion themselves. Of course they can use some of the tactics described above, but they can also make game highlight videos and create DVD’s to send to coaches of the school they think might be a fit. They can (for a substantial fee) get the videos posted on some popular “recruiting” websites so that they can showcase their ability to a broader audience by inviting a larger number coaches to the site via a link to their specific footage and stats. Having a strong supportive relationship with the high school coach is instrumental in making many of these things happen and should be considered as a top priority in getting noticed. Using their coach’s guidance and influence, these same athletes can build a network of contacts that can be effective in letting the coaching network work for them. Many amateur coaches often share information relating to specific skills or position players that may be needed in the coming season(s).

Darrell EdmondsDIrectorOakcrest Teen Center

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

Most schools have what is called a “prospective student athlete questionaire” on their athletics web page. Completing this questionaire and submitting it to the school is often the first step in the screening process. The second step for a number of high school sports is sending in “game film” to the recruiting coordinator. The remaining part of the recruiting process is truly based on a school’s interest in you as an athlete. Remember to be honest with yourself about your ability or talk to your high school coach about your talent level. Most people aren’t recruited by the schools that they most desire because they honestly don’t have the talent to play at that level.

Darrell EdmondsDIrectorOakcrest Teen Center

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

Most schools have what is called a “prospective student athlete questionaire” on their athletics web page. Completing this questionaire and submitting it to the school is often the first step in the screening process. The second step for a number of high school sports is sending in “game film” to the recruiting coordinator. The remaining part of the recruiting process is truly based on a school’s interest in you as an athlete. Remember to be honest with yourself about your ability or talk to your high school coach about your talent level. Most people aren’t recruited by the schools that they most desire because they honestly don’t have the talent to play at that level.

Chuck SlatePresidentCollege Advisors,LLC

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

With Great difficulty. Seriously most parents just don’t understand the prevailing myths which may end up hurting their student-athlete: They think their student athlete will get a full-ride. They think their student athlete is going to be “recruited”. They believe their student-athlete needs to play Div I, etc etc. Most high school student-athletes just don’t go on to the collegiate level and most who do don’t get the athletic money everybody assumes is there. There are many reasons for this. For this discussion, I would simply point out that MOST COACHES at MOST ATHLETIC PROGRAMS simply DO NOT have the budget to “SCOUT” or “RECRUIT” prospects typically more than an hours drive away. If you know coaches you know that athletic budgets are one of the big constraints hurting your young high school athlete. However, that provides YOU with the opportunity to take the scouting to them!! “If it’s Going to Be, It’s Up to Me” should be the student athlete slogan. A logical way to get recruited is to develop a MARKETING PLAN.

Joyce Vining MorganFounder and college counselorEducational Transitions

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

The major difference between college programs in any of the arts and a conservatory or art school program is the balance of work in the major and the rest of the curriculum. A liberal arts college arts major comprises roughly 40% of a student’s college work and usually leads to a Bachelor of Arts degree; in a conservatory that percentage is more like 60% and the degree is a Bachelor of Fine Arts. (Juilliard’s description may be helpful here: “The Dance Division offers four-year undergraduate programs leading to a Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) with liberal arts requirements, or a Diploma without liberal arts requirements. Most students in the Dance Division pursue the Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) degree. In addition to dance and dance-related studies, the four-year degree program includes 24 credits in the Liberal Arts department.”) Please note that there is the option of study without liberal arts requirements at this conservatory – that would not be available at a college dance department. A dance, or arts, major at a liberal arts college may be pre-professional, but at a conservatory it is definitely pre-professional.

Geoff BroomeAssistant Director of AdmissionsWidener University

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

It really depends on the level of talent that we are talking about. It also depends on which type of college a student wants to attend and how serious they are about their sport. Are we talking Div I, II, III, NAIA? There are recruiting services out there. One way to get noticed, depending on your sport is to attend summer camps at colleges that you are interested in. Also, make sure that you register with the NCAA Clearninghouse and with the NAIA. Your high school coach should also be making a push for you and working with you and your family to reach out to his or her contacts so that you get noticed by the school that is right for you.

William PepinDirector of GuidanceNorth Smithfield High School

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

Student-Athletes today have many different ways that they can be recruited by colleges and universities. This may happen through travel teams like AAU, High School athletic teams, and through various athletic showcases depending upon the sport. Recruiting services play a large role in athletics today and prospective student-athletes need to be aware of this fact. Some companies exist to solely help you, the student athlete, get the attention of schools that you are interested in today.

Tracy JacksonCoordinatorVirginia Beach City Public Schools

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

There are many factors that allow students to get recruited for their sport. It mostly has to do with “fit: If you excel in a sport or in a position on a team that a college or university is looking for then you have a greater chance. Write ups in local newspapers, your coaches connections with university coaches, performing well when recruiters come to watch a game…all of these factors can contribute to getting recruited. It is also imperative that you have taken the proper course load in school and obtain the necessary SAT/ACT score that will allow you to accept a possible offer.

John Happs

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

This is a multi-faceted question. 1. Make sure you have registered with the NCAA Eligibility Center. Know the difference between D-1/D-2/D-3/NAIA schools and what they can offer. Know the rules of being an amateur. 2. Create a “resume” for the sport that includes statistics about your performance. 3. Create a “letter of interest”. Today it is acceptable to email this letter. 4. Create video and be ready to send. 5. Depending on the sport, much of the recruiting may be done through clubs and not the high school. 6. Get your coach to help. I believe they have a responsibility to help put you on the college’s radar. 7. Be VERY careful of people that want to represent you in the recruiting process.

Joseph FreemanDean and College CounselorRandolph School

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

Athletic recruitment varies depending on the sport and whether or not there are objective measures of success. At any level, it is important for the student to contact the coach of the sport on the college side, and it will be important for current coaches to interact with the college coach as well. In most cases, coaches find players–not the other way round. Widen your exposure by participating in camps and special programs that college coaches use to gauge talent. Be sure to put together clips and highlights that give coaches a sense of an athlete’s skill. Write an athletics resume that highlights participation, awards, leadership, and statistics that indicate a player’s skill. Also, remember that some sports have more influence than others in college admissions, and this influence is often school-specific.

Henry DelAngeloHigh School Counselor 20 + yearsYour Key to College

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

The Student Athletes starts the process by working hard to be the best they can be. Along the way keep track of your stats and any press clippings. Attending camps during summer vacations and breaks where college coaches will be working or in attendance. Using your high school coach as a resource is a big help as well. The student can target the schools they would like to attend and reach out the coaching staff via email or written letter while supplying their key statistics. It is always helpful to do a little research on the team to see where you would fit in and use the information when communicating with the coaches.

Cindy ShermanGuidance Counselor/Crisis CounselorBloomfield High School

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

A number of ways – students may register through AAU for travel teams, which often are visited by coaches or recruiters. They should check websites of college teams, write to colleges, contact coaches of schools they are interested in, complete an athletic resume or portfolio and visit the coaches and the teams at the college

Judy ZoddaFounder and PresidentZodda College Services

Prospective student athletes – getting recruited

If you’re a top athlete in your sport and have had state, regional and national exposure in your sport, be it basketball, soccer, football or whatever your sport is, it’s likely that you’ve been noticed by coaches who are attending state, regional and natioonal tournaments. However, even those students who get noticed and followed over a period of years, not all of them end up playing in Division I or Division II schools. Only a very small percentage of all high school varsity athletes across all sports will ever play at the Division I or Division II level, approximately 1-2%. When you include those students who also play at Division II schools, you are still only talking about a total of about 3-4% for all three divisiions, but don’t get discouraged by the numbers.. If you think you might be a Division I or II player, (your current coaches from your club, AAU, or Junior teams might have mentioned that you might be of this calibre), you should start contacting coaches in your sophomore year to express your interest. (More about how, later) But don’t expect to hear back! Coaches can’t respond to you or any prospects in any way until you start your junior year, and tehn not even by phone. You should also register with the NCAA Student Eligiblity Center at the start of your junior year. Only DI and DII student – athletes are eligible for athletics schoarlships, except those playing for the Ivy League! DIII student – student athletes are also not elligible for athletic scholarships. For DI and DII student- athletes, you’ll need to send in an official copy of your high school transcript and your SAT scores when you get them back later in your junior year. There is also a form to send in that states your amateur status as an athlete. Even though DI and DII coaches might know who you are, they are not officially allowed to directly contact you by phone until July 1 between your junior and senior year of high school, with a few exceptions noted below. However, that doesn’t mean that you can’t contact them. The same can be said of Division III coaches, with these exceptions. You don’t need to register with the NCAA Student Eligibility Center for Division III. DIII coaches also don’t have the money in their budgets to attend all of the tournaments, meets, etc they would like to, so they can’t follow student – athletes to keep track of their development in their sport as they would like. So, DIII athletes almost need to do the recruting of the coaches and schools they are interested in. They can’t directly contact you by phone, but you can contact them and they are allowed to respond to you by mail or email. A good way for any student-athlete to get started in any division is to put together an athletic resume that includes your name, address, and other contact information, academic credentials including any standardized tests that you’ve taken, coursework completed or in progress, your GPA,and then your athletic credentials (teams you’ve played on and dates, position(s) you play, tournaments and results, individual recognition such as MVP, coaches and their contact information, etc. This should be preceded with an introductory letter that states your interest in the college and playing for their team. Each time you have any new news to report, you should contact each coach by email to keep him/her informed. They are allowed to respond to you by email or letter. You are allowed to go on as mnay “unofficial” visits as you want. “Unofficial” visits are those visits where no costs incurred by the student to visit are paid for by the unviersity. Only DI and DII schools are allowed to pay for official visits on or after September 1 of the senior year. DIII schools can invite ahtletes on official visits, but cannot pay any of their expenses. on your visits you can talk to the coaches about their program, if they might be needing someone in your position/event, the number of hours/week that are spent in practice on the field, breaking down game tape, lifting weights, both in and out of season, whether athletes live together or with the general student body, a tour of the facilities, whether there are tutors to help if travel is required and you miss class and a whole host of other types of issues that affect student-athletes both in and out of the classroom. It’s also a good idea to have a videotape that shows a few highlights, but also 15-20 minutes of continuous play if you are a soccer player, football player, etc. Coaches want to see what you do well, but they also want to see how you recover from your mistakes on the filed or what your weaknesses are. PAY ATTENTION TO THE RULES: THEY ARE COMPLICATED Division I After July 1 between junior and senior year, coaches in DI can call student athletes directly with the following exceptions: A football prospect can receive one phone call in May of junior year from any institution. A men’s basketball player can receive one phone call/month from June 15th prior to his junior year until June 30th prior to his senior year. Starting July 1 of his senior year, he can receive aone weekly call. A women’s basketball player can receive one phone call in April and one phone call in May of junior year. DIVISION II A coach can call on June 15 prior to senior year. DIVISION III: A coach can call immediately after the completion of the Prospective student- athlete’s junior year. Of course, I haven’t covered the National Letter of Intent and many other considerations and rules. It’s impossible to cover over 450 pages of rules just for Division I here, let alone the other two divisions, but you’ve got the basics! Get going!

Wendy RockSchool CounselorHahnville High School

Student Athletes

The coach plays a very important role in helping students get recruited, along with the school counselor. The coach is the one who can vouch for a student’s talent and level of playing ability. The coach is also the one who makes the initial contact with the college recruiting coach. The school counselor plays an important role in guiding and advising a student on academic eligibility. Informing students of the necessary ACT or SAT scores and GPA, and also, letting the student know where he/she stands in terms of academic eligibility. The school counselor will be the secondary contact with the recruiting coach letting them know where the student stands academically. If the coach is not helpful, the athletic director can also help. School counselors can also contact the college and/or encourage the student to contact the college and let them know the student is interested in participating in sports. Occasionally through this contact a recruiting coach may come to see the student perform or invite the student for a tryout. However, the process usually begins with the coach sending a tape to the recruiting coach.

James LundgrenPartnerCollege Planning Solutions

Be your own recruiter

Coaches want to hear from you, not Mom & Dad, or a professional recruiting company! Choose the right colleges for you, compose an appropriate cover letter, create an effective one-page resume, compile an abbreviated athletic recruiting video (8 – 10 minutes), tracking and be proactive with your college communications, send out one-page highlight updates to the coaches you are working with.

Judy ZoddaFounder and PresidentZodda College Services

Prospective student athletes – getting recruited

If you’re a top athlete in your sport and have had state, regional and national exposure in your sport, be it basketball, soccer, football or whatever your sport is, it’s likely that you’ve been noticed by coaches who are attending those tournaments. However, even those students who get noticed and followed over a period of years, not all of them end up playing in Division I or Division II schools. Only a very small percentage of all high school varsity athletes across all sports will ever play at the Division I or Division II level, approximately 1-2%. When you include those students who also play at Division III schools, you are still only talking about a total of about 3-4% for all three divisiions, but don’t get discouraged by the numbers.. If you think you might be a Division I or II player, (your current coaches from your club, AAU, or Junior teams might have mentioned that you might be of this caliber), you should start contacting coaches in your sophomore year to express your interest. (More about how, later) But don’t expect to hear back! Coaches can’t respond to you or any prospects in any way until you start your junior year, and then not even by phone..On September 1 of your junior year, they can send written correspondece about their athletic program, a brochure, email, text messages,IM or fax. As a porspective student-athlete, you should also register with the NCAA Student Eligiblity Center at the start of your junior year. Only DI and DII pospective student – athletes are eligible for athletic scholarlships, except those playing for the Ivy League! DIII student – student athletes are also not elligible for athletic scholarships. For DI and DII prospective student – athletes, you’ll need to send in an official copy of your high school transcript and your SAT scores when you get them back later in your junior year. There is also a form to send in that states your amateur status as an athlete. Even though DI and DII coaches might know who you are, they are not officially allowed to directly contact you by phone until July 1 between your junior and senior year of high school, with a few exceptions noted below. However, that doesn’t mean that you can’t contact them. The same can be said of Division III coaches, with these exceptions. You don’t need to register with the NCAA Student Eligibility Center for Division III. DIII coaches also don’t have the money in their budgets to attend all of the tournaments, meets, etc they would like to, so they can’t follow student – athletes to keep track of their development in their sport as they would like. So, DIII athletes almost need to do the recruting of the coaches and schools they are interested in. They can’t directly contact you by phone, but you can contact them and they are allowed to respond to you by mail or email (but not until the start of junior year)! A good way for any student-athlete to get started in any division is to put together an athletic resume that includes your name, address, and other contact information, academic credentials including any standardized tests that you’ve taken, coursework completed or in progress, your GPA,and then your athletic credentials (teams you’ve played on and dates, position(s) you play, tournaments and results, individual recognition such as MVP, coaches names and their contact information, etc. This should be preceded with an introductory letter that states your interest in the college and playing for their team. Each time you have any new news to report, you should contact each coach by email to keep him/her informed. They are allowed to respond to you by email or letter. You are allowed to go on as many “unofficial” visits as you want. “Unofficial” visits are those visits where no costs incurred by the student to visit are paid for by the unviersity. Only DI and DII schools are allowed to pay for official visits on or after September 1 of the senior year. DIII schools can invite ahtletes on official visits, but cannot pay any of their expenses. On your visits prospective student – athletes should talk to the coaches about their program, if they might be needing someone in your position/event, the number of hours/week that are spent in practice on the field, breaking down game tape, lifting weights, hours both in and out of season, whether athletes live together or with the general student body, a tour of the facilities, whether there are tutors to help if travel is required and you miss class and a whole host of other types of issues that affect student-athletes both in and out of the classroom. It’s also a good idea to have a videotape that shows a few highlights, but also 15-20 minutes of continuous play if you are a soccer player, football player, etc. Coaches want to see what you do well, but they also want to see how you recover from your mistakes on the filed or what your weaknesses are. PAY ATTENTION TO THE RULES: THEY ARE COMPLICATED Division I After July 1 between junior and senior year, coaches in DI can call student athletes directly with the following exceptions: A football prospect can receive one phone call in May of junior year from any institution. A men’s basketball player can receive one phone call/month from June 15th prior to his junior year until June 30th prior to his senior year. Starting July 1 of his senior year, he can receive one weekly call. A women’s basketball player can receive one phone call in April and one phone call in May of junior year. DIVISION II A coach can call on June 15 prior to senior year. DIVISION III: A coach can call immediately after the completion of the prospective student- athlete’s junior year. Of course, I haven’t covered the National Letter of Intent and many other considerations and rules. It’s impossible to cover over 450 pages of rules just for Division I here, let alone the other two divisions, but you’ve got the basics! Get going!

Miladys Penalver-Howard

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

High school students should first set up a meeting with their school counselor to discuss the NCAA Clearinghouse process for all high school athletes to ensure you are meeting the necessary requirements.

Jay Gopal

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

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Michael PuccioPresident/Advisor/Life CoachFuture First Advisors, LLC

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

NCAA has very specific guidelines when it comes to the recruitment process – and they can be confusing! Just like anything else related to gaining admissions to a college, you should start the process in 9th grade with playing on your HS teams as well as any intramural teams that may exist within your community. Fast forward to Late Winter/Early Spring of your Junior year. The very first thing you need to do is register with the NCAA Eligibility Center (http://www.eligibilitycenter.org). You will enter in some information about your academics and the sport(s) which you play. Basically, your registration with this database allows the NCAA to determine if you are actually eligible to play sports in college (grades, coursework, SAT/ACT scores all play a role in this). At the same time you should draft a letter that you will send to coaches indicating your interest in playing your sport at their college and create a resume highlighting your athletic experiences. You should also put together a “highlight video” – basically a short collection of videos showing you at your best while playing your sport. Start sending these items to coaches as soon as you can. What transpires from this point forward is very specific to the sport which you play. There is a very specific timeline made up of “periods” which allow for certain types of contact with coaches. These periods are called the “contact period”, “evaluation period”, “quiet period” and “dead period.” My suggestion to you is to go to the following link: http://www.ncaa.org/wps/wcm/connect/public/NCAA/Eligibility/Becoming+Eligible/Recruiting. On this page you will be able to review all of the terminology related to the recruitment process and will be able to download your sport’s calendar so that you will know when each “period” occurs and what you need to do during each “period”. Sounds like a lot, but just like everything else related to the college application process, it’s a timeline. Stay focused and keep yourself organized and you will do great! Best of luck!

Tom ChandlerAthletic Recruiting Adviserwww.IvyRecruiting.com

Getting recruited

There are four steps to the recruiting process. The athlete must be identified by a college coach, he must be evaluated positively based on information the coach receives, he must be compared to other athletes the coach is considering for his position, and then he must be the one who receives the offer of those the coach has qualified academically and athletically. If you are going to be recruited for your sport, the chances are you would already know it. Scholarship school coaches are looking at blue chip athletes as freshmen and sophomores and there are ways for them to contact athletes through their club or high school coaches and make offers well before they are allowed to personally email athletes September 1 of their junior year or call them, July 1 before senior year for most sports. If you look at http://www.ncaa.org/wps/wcm/connect/public/NCAA/Issues/Recruiting/Probability+of+Going+Pro, you will see that only about 1 in 20 high school athletes will be on any NCAA college team in either Division I, II or III. So the answer to the question for D I team sports is the coach has to know you exist, he has to be interested in you based on the information provided to him, you have to be seen competing by college coaches, and then you have to emerge as the one they decide to make the offer to. Neither D I nor D III coaches are allowed to try out athletes on their campus, although D II does permit an athlete to work out with the college team players. For team sports, there are ways to work around that rule at D I and D III schools, but the best way for a coach to judge your performance is to watch you play in a highly competitive club team event so they can judge how you play, how well you play, and how you compare to other athletes they are considering or your position. For individual sports, of course, there is a way to be measured based on previous competitive results. There are tennis rankings that show who the competition was and the scores of each match. Swimming or track and field coaches can judge an athlete based on past performances. Golf, or squash coaches can track results and rankings. But even in these cases, personal attributes and intangibles still matter when a coach decides whom to recruit. Knowing all that, don’t even start the process unless you have a coach that knows you well and who believes you have the ability to play at the next level, and be realistic about your ability level. Then be proactive and throw a wide net by contacting coaches at schools appropriate to your ability level and academic credentials. Showing interest to those coaches will be the most effective way to get coaches to see you play or to consider you for their program.

adam baerWriter and Editor for Top National Magazines, Websites, and Newspapers

The secret to getting recruited by a college sports team

Good local press with online media. A lot of people think that getting noticed by a local newspaper is the first step to receiving attention from a recruiter. But lately there have been new local sites from AOL called Patch sprouting up, and other similar sites. Get the attention of one of those sites, and a piece about you could be syndicated on a huge online network like AOL or the Huffington Post. Also self-produce videos for YouTube, and use all your social media clout to get something to go viral. Recruiters, like entertainment agents, are more likely to want you if you already have a following — especially one that exists outside your local area.

Nina BerlerFounderunCommon Apps

‘Want to be a Recruited Athlete?

I often advise athletes, and I am always impressed with them. Somehow, with their studies and nonacademic obligations, these athletes manage practice, game and playoff schedules. Many of the students I see don’t go on to play their sports at the college level, but a few have. Here’s what I see of the process and what I advise . . . First of all, don’t attempt to go at this alone. I recommend a third party such as a recruiter, and if funds don’t permit, engaging the support of your coaches and training staff. First of all, prospective athletes need a resume or brag sheet that they can post and forward to interested coaches. They also need to make a video. There are many schools of thought regarding the video, including what to contain and how long it should be, but again, I would advise consulting an expert. There are companies who make videos. One that I know is Pro Dynamix; you can find contact information on the Internet. With a resume and video, and the support of your advisory team, you will be able to reach out to coaches or be there should coaches be watching you. This is an exhausting and time-consuming process for all involved. You may have some very appealing colleges show interest, but beware; they may not be there over the long-term. Recruited athletes have their rewards; the lucky ones know where they’ll be for college months ahead of their peers.

Allen HillSchool CounselorAntelope Union High School

How do prospective students get recruited for their sport?

The college recruiting process can be a daunting effort if it is not well planned and executed with organization and enthusiasm from start to finish. Contacts: Recruiting contacts are essential for both college coaches and families to become familiar with each other. Whether contacts are made by phone, e-mail or face to face, the aim of the college coach will be to simply make an effort to cultivate a strong relationship with the prospect and family Evaluations: These are opportunities for college coaches to assess the academic and athletic ability of a prospect. NCAA Eligibility: The NCAA Eligibility Center is an organization that collaborates with the NCAA in the area of student-athlete eligibility. Campus Visits: Unofficial Visit: The unofficial visit is a great way for prospects and families to begin to become familiar with a number of colleges and universities. Official Visit: The official visit is a wonderful means of narrowing down your college choices by spending quality time with the coaching staff, current student-athletes and college administrators.

Joseph RomanoCollege CounselorBellarmine College Preparatory

Be proactive with College Coaches

Students should send emails to prospective college coaches that work at collleges and for programs in which they are interested. These emaills should be brief, include some stats and accomplishments, and clearly express interest.

王文君 June ScortinoPresidentIVY Counselors Network

there are many ways of recommending yourself

some counselors are specialzied in recommending students for the athletic department. in many cases, parents are contacting the colleges directly with successful experiences. you may consider early visits to colleges and meet the coach in person. it is alwasy considered to invite the coach directly to your game.

Frank DonPartnerEast West College Counseling LLP

Comprehensive vs Specialized

The primary difference between college dance departments and conservatory dance departments is the difference between a comprehensive education and a specialized training focus. College dance majors are often required to take courses that may have a broader, more liberal arts bent, while conservatory programs focus on performance and specifically on performance arts. If the student is committed to performance arts, then a conservatory approach might be the best avenue to consider. However, if the student wants a broader education with a major in dance, then considering a college with a strong dance department would be suggested. The college approach would be a more generalized approach, while the conservatory would be a more professional training in the performance arts approach.

Carita Del ValleFounderAcademic Decisions

Mostly by presenting themselves

Each sport is certainly different and it is extremely important that athletes look at the NCAA guides to realistically understand how many kids are playing their specific sport nationwide. Once the have a clear picture of the sheer numbers (think football – it’s huge) then students can put themselves in the shoes of the coach and realize the burden of recruiting ultimately comes down to the athlete. Very few potential candidates are actively sought. Reaching out to a school that the student has identified he or she wants to “play” for is the first step as this shows demonstrated interest. Most have it on their athletic website. Keeping up with NCAA registration and academic requirements, understanding the coach and student interaction rules, having a video submission ready and available on YouTube, attending key college recruiting days at sporting events, inviting a coach to a sporting event where you will be playing and having an athletic resume with all of the necessary statistics will get the student is a excellent position to speak with coaches across the country.

Megan DorseySAT Prep & College AdvisorCollege Prep LLC

You Get Recruited Based On Talent & Their Needs

I know there are a lot of companies out there promising to get prospective students recruited with a personalized website, athletic resume, or highlight reel, but promotions don’t get you recruited; talent does. College coaches keep an eye on the rankings and begin to identify top performers as early as 9th or 10th grade. If they are interested in you, you will hear from them. (Understand the restrictions on coaches contacting you; download the NCAA Guide for Student Athletes.) If you are interested in a program, start by comparing their stats to yours. You can contact coaches and provide a resume and links to video highlights, but they will be looking for talent that matches the needs of their program. You may be the best pitcher in your region, but if the coach is looking for outfielders this year, that program may not recruit you.

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