Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

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Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

Mark GathercoleUniversity AdvisorIndependent University Advising

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

Unless there are extenuating circumstances, college is a time to step out and away from home to be “on your own”. Of course, you’re never all alone at college – there are always people and facilities to take care of you when you need a little TLC. I think the distance from home is less important than whether or not a school fits you – is it a place where you can be comfortable, thrive, and grow for four years? If a college fits you like an old shoe, it becomes your second home. You will never completely let go of your first one, but you will feel less need to be closely attached to it.

Mark GathercoleUniversity AdvisorIndependent University Advising

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

Unless there are extenuating circumstances, college is a time to step out and away from home to be “on your own”. Of course, you’re never all alone at college – there are always people and facilities to take care of you when you need a little TLC. I think the distance from home is less important than whether or not a school fits you – is it a place where you can be comfortable, thrive, and grow for four years? If a college fits you like an old shoe, it becomes your second home. You will never completely let go of your first one, but you will feel less need to be closely attached to it.

Mark GathercoleUniversity AdvisorIndependent University Advising

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

Unless there are extenuating circumstances, college is a time to step out and away from home to be “on your own”. Of course, you’re never all alone at college – there are always people and facilities to take care of you when you need a little TLC. I think the distance from home is less important than whether or not a school fits you – is it a place where you can be comfortable, thrive, and grow for four years? If a college fits you like an old shoe, it becomes your second home. You will never completely let go of your first one, but you will feel less need to be closely attached to it.

Mark GathercoleUniversity AdvisorIndependent University Advising

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

Unless there are extenuating circumstances, college is a time to step out and away from home to be “on your own”. Of course, you’re never all alone at college – there are always people and facilities to take care of you when you need a little TLC. I think the distance from home is less important than whether or not a school fits you – is it a place where you can be comfortable, thrive, and grow for four years? If a college fits you like an old shoe, it becomes your second home. You will never completely let go of your first one, but you will feel less need to be closely attached to it.

Benjamin Waldmann

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

Depends upon what your trying to get out of your college experience. I would always recommend going out of your comfort zone as the extra responsibilities of being detached from your family/friend support will enable resilience and maturity for the student. If you are in the position where finances are tight then it’s best to stay close to home so that you can save on accomodation costs as well as local tuition benefits which will cut down that post-student debt which many struggle with. One of the great things about college is that it’s often the first time that we first encounter that responsibilities of adult life therefore the more you can embrace these responsibilities the more equipped you will be for your future(e.g. paying bills,cooking for ourselves,making important decisions unilaterally). As well as taking on important responsibilities, the ability to “network” for future career possibilities will be fully expressed if one moves to school far away, especially to another country or a college with a diverse student base. I know for myself, the ability to network with different types of people gave me many career opportunities after graduating. I have several key networking tips for those looking for post student opportunities 🙂

Reecy ArestyCollege Admissions/Financial Aid Expert & AuthorPayless For College, Inc.

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

All depends on whether the college has the right curriculum, desirability, meets all your specific criteria & is affordable.

Kris HintzFounderPosition U 4 College LLC

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

That depends on many factors. First, the personality and culture of the student and his or her relationship with the family is paramount. A student who is very close to his or her family, who has strong emotional needs for coming home frequently, would probably be happier attending a college within a three hour driving radius. There may be cultural expectations of frequent home visits, especially among immigrants. Second, the student’s extracurricular activities may involve the family. If the student participates in sports and the family enjoys going to his or her home games, or if the student is in the performing arts and the family attends his or her concerts or plays, it may be important to be within that magic three hour radius. Third, the family’s financial situation and/or time flexibility may dictate geography. Air or train travel adds cost to the college bill. If the parents do not have time to drive eight or more hours one way to pick up a child at school, perhaps the student should consider a college nearer to home. All that said, you only go to college once, and part of the college adventure may include exploring a different part of the country. Willingness to consider colleges outside of your geographic comfort zone might open up more academic options as well.

Kris HintzFounderPosition U 4 College LLC

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

That depends on many factors. First, the personality and culture of the student and his or her relationship with the family is paramount. A student who is very close to his or her family, who has strong emotional needs for coming home frequently, would probably be happier attending a college within a three hour driving radius. There may be expectations of frequent home visits for families from some cultural backgrounds. Second, the student’s extracurricular activities may involve the family. If the student participates in sports and the family enjoys going to his or her home games, or if the student is in the performing arts and the family attends his or her concerts or plays, it may be important to be within that magic three hour radius. Third, the family’s financial situation and/or time flexibility may dictate geography. Air or train travel adds cost to the college bill. If the parents do not have time to drive eight or more hours one way to pick up a child at school, perhaps the student should consider a college nearer to home. All that said, you only go to college once, and part of the college adventure may include exploring a different part of the country. Willingness to consider colleges outside of your geographic comfort zone might open up more academic options as well.

Janet Kraus

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

If staying home isn’t about saving money, GO AWAY! Statistically speaking, it may be the only time you leave your hometown. It will give you a new perspective and a place that is quintessentially yours. It will get you involved in your college faster and more deeply. You don’t have to go FAR far away, but go far enough that you’re not tempted to come home every weekend.

Tira HarpazFounderCollegeBound Advice

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

There’s no right or wrong answer here. Some students need to be commuters or attend a school close to home for financial or family reasons. Some students like the comfort of knowing that family is close by and that they can return home for weekends. Other students love the idea of traveling across the country for college, to experience a different state, culture or climate. And many students want to go to a school that is within driving distance of home, but not too close.

Steven CrispOwner Crisp College Advising

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

There really is no right or wrong answer to this question. It will depend on each personal situation. There are advantages and disadvantages to both options. If you live close to home you can always visit siblings and parents easily and you have someone there to rely on. If you go to college to far away it can expensive and difficult to return home. You might only be able to come on at Christmas. But, at the same time going to school far away can be a great adventure. You will probably be living in a new climate, will be introduced to new customs and will have a different learning experience. I would suggest exploring both options thoroughly and also rely on other reasons to apply to the school, not just the distance from home.

Dustin GiesenhagenCounselorGrand Junction High School

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

A very common question! Many students battle with this dilemma… should I stay close to home near family but maybe miss out on a new experience or should I go somewhere new and exciting but be far from those I care about? The answer is never clear and there are many factors to consider. First off, are you set on your course of study or are you do you see yourself possibly changing majors numerous times? Some schools only offer certain programs which could influence where you choose to go and therefore how far you have to travel. Do you have the means to travel back and forth between school and home if you desire to? Some students have never been away from home for more than a week and get homesick very quickly. Others know that they will be okay if they only visit home for the holidays and therefore will be okay going off to a school that is far away. If you still can’t decide, is it possible find a happy medium? I’ve found that many students (including myself) are very happy if they find a school that is around a 300 mile radius from their home. This provides the feeling of moving away and becoming autonomous while also providing the opportunity to travel home for the weekend in case you need some home cooking and a break from the school cafeteria! Either way you go, this is an important decision to make and you should be sure to discuss it with your family.

Rebecca JosephExecutive Director & Foundergetmetocollege.org

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

Should I stay or should I go? These are questions that only you can answer. Some kids like to stay close to home so they can have mom do laundry, visit easily on weekends, or even live at home. Others like to venture further away and explore a new area of the country, live in dorms, and take advantage of amazing learning opportunities. I get sad when kids stick close to home because parents want them to. Of course, finances play an issue but there are many ways to finance attending a college that is further away. I believe kids should be able to go away and experience the joy of learning at the best college for them. Dorm life is unique and attending the best college for you is the goal. If you need help convincing your parents to let you go away, let us know. We have plenty of parents who have taken the big step and will speak with you or your parents.

Lora LewisEducational ConsultantLora Lewis Consulting

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

College isn’t a one-size-fits-all experience. Whether it’s better for you to go away or stay near home depends on your own needs, personality and situation. Going far away will offer many new experiences and push you to explore outside your comfort zone, but it is also more expensive and has the drawback of taking you away from family and friends. Staying near home may be more economical and let you keep in closer touch with those you care about, but it can also make you feel like you haven’t really “gone” anywhere. When you start thinking about where you’d like to attend college, do an honest self-inventory of what really matters to you in your college experience and what you need to be happy and learn best. Ultimately, you can get a good education three miles away or three thousand; you want to be sure you’re in a place where you have the right balance of challenge and security to enable you to take advantage of all college has to offer.

Geoff BroomeAssistant Director of AdmissionsWidener University

What are you ready for?

What do you want to do? When in your life will you get the chance to experience something new? When will you have the opportunity to live someplace different? Maybe you feel comfortable close to home, that’s fine. Then stay close to home. Maybe you want to explore something totally different. If you are on the east coast, maybe you want to go South or southwest. If you are int he south, maybe you want to explore Philadelphia, New York, Boston, or D.C. If you are on the West Coast, Why would you ever leave that beautiful weather? 🙂 There are some great schools out there that are not close to where you live. Explore them. As an aside, sometimes schools where the cost of living is less, their tuition,room, and board is less too. The difference in cost savings can buy a lot of plane tickets.

Jill KaratkewiczCounselorEast Hampton High School

Personal Decision

This is obviously a highly personal question! There are benefits and drawbacks to each scenario. Most students tend not to stray tremendously far from home when applying to colleges. Others, however, can’t wait to get away! Some possible benefits of staying close to home: In-State tuition for state colleges/universities, ability to return home whenever desired (evening, weekends, holiday, etc), eating a home-cooked meal, sleeping in your own bed, and perhaps even getting some laundry done for you! That said, there are some benefits to looking further away to school: You may increase your chances of admission at a college further away because they are looking to have geographic diversity in their incoming class, you can live in a different climate (warmer, colder, drier, etc), or experience a different “culture” (e.g. fast paced New England vs. laid back West Coast). Of course, if you decide to attend a school that is farther away, be prepared that you may not be able to come home whenever you’d like – travel is expensive and many families cannot afford to bring their students home multiple times throughout the year.

Jill KaratkewiczCounselorEast Hampton High School

Personal Decision

This is obviously a highly personal question! There are benefits and drawbacks to each scenario. Most students tend not to stray tremendously far from home when applying to colleges. Others, however, can’t wait to get away! Some possible benefits of staying close to home: In-State tuition for state colleges/universities, ability to return home whenever desired (evening, weekends, holiday, etc), eating a home-cooked meal, sleeping in your own bed, and perhaps even getting some laundry done for you! That said, there are some benefits to looking further away to school: You may increase your chances of admission at a college further away because they are looking to have geographic diversity in their incoming class, you can live in a different climate (warmer, colder, drier, etc), or experience a different “culture” (e.g. fast paced New England vs. laid back West Coast). Of course, if you decide to attend a school that is farther away, be prepared that you may not be able to come home whenever you’d like – travel is expensive and many families cannot afford to bring their students home multiple times throughout the year.

Mollie ReznickAssociate DirectorThe College Connection

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

The answer to this question might involve a discussion with your parents as they may have their own ideas about how near or far they’d like you to be. But for yourself, it might take some real consideration. For instance, if you get sick, would you like to be near enough for parents to pick you up and take you home? Do you want to be able to come home for holidays, birthdays, etc? If these things are important to you, you might want to stay within a 3 hour or so radius. On the other hand, is it important to you to be adventurous? Do you want to be in an environment very different from the one in which you were raised? Among people who are different from those with whom you grew up? If so, you might need to go to a school that you would have to fly to. All in all, there are pluses and minuses to both, so it’s all about what your priorities are.

Mollie ReznickAssociate DirectorThe College Connection

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

The answer to this question might involve a discussion with your parents as they may have their own ideas about how near or far they’d like you to be. But for yourself, it might take some real consideration. For instance, if you get sick, would you like to be near enough for parents to pick you up and take you home? Do you want to be able to come home for holidays, birthdays, etc? If these things are important to you, you might want to stay within a 3 hour or so radius. On the other hand, is it important to you to be adventurous? Do you want to be in an environment very different from the one in which you were raised? Among people who are different from those with whom you grew up? If so, you might need to go to a school that you would have to fly to. All in all, there are pluses and minuses to both, so it’s all about what your priorities are.

Reena Gold KaminsFounderCollege, Career & Life, LLC.

Location! Location! Location!

Staying close to home is not better than going away and vice versa. Each has its advantages. If you stay close to home, it’s easier to visit for long weekends or shorter breaks like Thanksgiving or Presidents’ Weekend. But, if you’re far away, you get to experience a new part of the country!

Patricia KrahnkePresident/PartnerGlobal College Search Associates, LLC

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

Short Answer: There are lots of good reasons for both close and far away. Detailed Answer: Here are a few reasons you may want to attend college far away from home… 1. You’re sick of your hometown – like, totally 2. You love your parents but you’re sick of ‘em, and you don’t want them to be able to visit you easily 3. You want to get away from everyone you know in high school (and perhaps a regrettable reputation) and reinvent yourself completely, give yourself another chance to succeed (I knew a student who gave this very reason for going far away to college) 4. You live in the South, but you want to be able to ski 5. You live in the North, but you want to be able to hit the beach 6. You live in the East, but you’re sick of the traffic and too many people 7. You live in the West, but you want the excitement of the East 8. You live anywhere in the U.S., but you want to experience cultural and language immersion somewhere else in the world 9. Your family has the money to be able to get you back home for holiday and semester breaks 10. Your girlfriend/boyfriend is going to a college far away from home 11. You want a whole new experience some place unfamiliar Here are a few (very good) reasons you may want to be closer to home… 1. Your family is close-knit, and it would be upsetting to you to be too far away 2. Your family is dealing with a challenge that requires your attention, i.e. a parent is ill, your grandparents raised you and they are becoming fragile, etc. 3. You have physical, emotional, or mental health issues that need the support of your family (this is nothing to feel uncomfortable about; I know from experience how many students come to college with all types of hidden conditions that cause them to struggle) 4. Your family cannot afford the tremendous out-of-pocket costs that traveling between a long distance college and home incurs; most families today simply cannot afford these extras 5. You would rather save your money for a master’s degree program that is out of state than blow it all on a glamorous college far away that won’t give you a better education than the one right where you live now 6. You are worried that spending your first year at a college far away from home may expose you to challenges you may be too weak to resist without the support of your family and/or your counselor, i.e. addictions, including alcohol, drugs, online gambling, etc. 7. Your girlfriend/boyfriend may be the love of your life, and you don’t want to move away and risk losing her/him 8. You prefer the familiar to the unfamiliar

Patricia KrahnkePresident/PartnerGlobal College Search Associates, LLC

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

Short Answer: There are lots of good reasons for both close and far away. Detailed Answer: Here are a few reasons you may want to attend college far away from home… 1. You’re sick of your hometown – like, totally 2. You love your parents but you’re sick of ‘em, and you don’t want them to be able to visit you easily 3. You want to get away from everyone you know in high school (and perhaps a regrettable reputation) and reinvent yourself completely, give yourself another chance to succeed (I knew a student who gave this very reason for going far away to college) 4. You live in the South, but you want to be able to ski 5. You live in the North, but you want to be able to hit the beach 6. You live in the East, but you’re sick of the traffic and too many people 7. You live in the West, but you want the excitement of the East 8. You live anywhere in the U.S., but you want to experience cultural and language immersion somewhere else in the world 9. Your family has the money to be able to get you back home for holiday and semester breaks 10. Your girlfriend/boyfriend is going to a college far away from home 11. You want a whole new experience some place unfamiliar Here are a few (very good) reasons you may want to be closer to home… 1. Your family is close-knit, and it would be upsetting to you to be too far away 2. Your family is dealing with a challenge that requires your attention, i.e. a parent is ill, your grandparents raised you and they are becoming fragile, etc. 3. You have physical, emotional, or mental health issues that need the support of your family (this is nothing to feel uncomfortable about; I know from experience how many students come to college with all types of hidden conditions that cause them to struggle) 4. Your family cannot afford the tremendous out-of-pocket costs that traveling between a long distance college and home incurs; most families today simply cannot afford these extras 5. You would rather save your money for a master’s degree program that is out of state than blow it all on a glamorous college far away that won’t give you a better education than the one right where you live now 6. You are worried that spending your first year at a college far away from home may expose you to challenges you may be too weak to resist without the support of your family and/or your counselor, i.e. addictions, including alcohol, drugs, online gambling, etc. 7. Your girlfriend/boyfriend may be the love of your life, and you don’t want to move away and risk losing her/him 8. You prefer the familiar to the unfamiliar

Eric ChancySchool CounselorApex High School – 9-12

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

What do you need? Are you comfortable with being far away, or do you need to be closer to home? Neither is wrong or bad, just another of the many preferences that students need to able to look at as a whole when selecting their schools. For instance: it is the best program in the country for your major, but you have never been further than a state away from home for more than a week in your life. What is YOUR comfort level with being 400 miles away? 800 miles? Across the country? Are you okay with being somewhere that you have no immediate family support? What if you decide you really need to get away from campus for a weekend? All of this is dependent on your individual needs, so take the time to consider it well!

Cheryl Millington

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

The answer is it depends. Let’s assume that you have two equal choices in schools and the only difference is location; one is closer to home than the other. The difference in distance can affect the following: 1. How often you can return home. Obviously it’s easier to come home on any weekend if your’re just an hour away. However, if you’re 8 hours away, it probably only possible on long weekends, Christmas and March break. 2. How often your parents can visit (you may need their support more than you think). If you’re further away, your parents may visit less often but their trips may last longer. Your parents may also worry more about you if they feel you’re far away from them. 3. The availability and ease of accessing different modes of transportation (e.g., care pooling, bus, train, plane). 4. The cost of returning home will increase the further away you are. When you’re budgeting do consider the frequency and cost of returning home. 5. Your level of homesickness or transition issues may increase the further away from home you are. Location is a huge deciding factor so weigh the pros and cons very, very carefully.

Cheryl Millington

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

The answer is it depends. Let’s assume that you have two equal choices in schools and the only difference is location; one is closer to home than the other. The difference in distance can affect the following: 1. How often you can return home. Obviously it’s easier to come home on any weekend if your’re just an hour away. However, if you’re 8 hours away, it probably only possible on long weekends, Christmas and March break. 2. How often your parents can visit (you may need their support more than you think). If you’re further away, your parents may visit less often but their trips may last longer. Your parents may also worry more about you if they feel you’re far away from them. 3. The availability and ease of accessing different modes of transportation (e.g., care pooling, bus, train, plane). 4. The cost of returning home will increase the further away you are. When you’re budgeting do consider the frequency and cost of returning home. 5. Your level of homesickness or transition issues may increase the further away from home you are. Location is a huge deciding factor so weigh the pros and cons very, very carefully.

Bill PrudenHead of Upper School, College CounselorRavenscroft School

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

It depends upon what you are looking for in your education. The fundamental aspects of the academic experience will not be impacted significantly by how far away you go. However your personal development may be impacted and the informal aspects of your experience will certainly be affected. Things like not being able to return home as easily or as often will impact your developing sense of independence and self-reliance, while your distance from home is also likely to influence the kind of students who will be your classmate, thus impacting your broader educational experience. Too, there are likely to be financial aspects associated with being further away, especially travel costs, so keep that in mind. These types of things rather than the core academic aspects of your experience are the things most impacted by the decision to attend a school far away or close to home—but are important pieces of the equation you consider whether the school is a good fit.

Karen Ekman-BaurDirector of College CounselingLeysin American School

Close to Home or Far Away

This question is a tricky one. A student should ultimately be comfortable with the decision he/she makes, but it can be a good idea to reach out of one’s “comfort zone”. This goes for parents, too, who sometimes need to learn to let go. A student may be better able to expand his/her horizons when attending college not so close to home. There are a lot of factors that would have to be considered, though – finances, travel issues, college/university opportunities close to home, family needs, etc.

Patricia KrahnkePresident/PartnerGlobal College Search Associates, LLC

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

Short Answer: There are lots of good reasons for both close and far away. Detailed Answer: Here are a few reasons you may want to attend college far away from home… 1. You’re sick of your hometown – like, totally 2. You love your parents but you’re sick of ‘em, and you don’t want them to be able to visit you easily 3. You want to get away from everyone you know in high school (and perhaps a regrettable reputation) and reinvent yourself completely, give yourself another chance to succeed (I knew a student who gave this very reason for going far away to college) 4. You live in the South, but you want to be able to ski 5. You live in the North, but you want to be able to hit the beach 6. You live in the East, but you’re sick of the traffic and too many people 7. You live in the West, but you want the excitement of the East 8. You live anywhere in the U.S., but you want to experience cultural and language immersion somewhere else in the world 9. Your family has the money to be able to get you back home for holiday and semester breaks 10. Your girlfriend/boyfriend is going to a college far away from home 11. You want a whole new experience some place unfamiliar Here are a few (very good) reasons you may want to be closer to home… 1. Your family is close-knit, and it would be upsetting to you to be too far away 2. Your family is dealing with a challenge that requires your attention, i.e. a parent is ill, your grandparents raised you and they are becoming fragile, etc. 3. You have physical, emotional, or mental health issues that need the support of your family (this is nothing to feel uncomfortable about; I know from experience how many students come to college with all types of hidden conditions that cause them to struggle) 4. Your family cannot afford the tremendous out-of-pocket costs that traveling between a long distance college and home incurs; most families today simply cannot afford these extras 5. You would rather save your money for a master’s degree program that is out of state than blow it all on a glamorous college far away that won’t give you a better education than the one right where you live now 6. You are worried that spending your first year at a college far away from home may expose you to challenges you may be too weak to resist without the support of your family and/or your counselor, i.e. addictions, including alcohol, drugs, online gambling, etc. 7. Your girlfriend/boyfriend may be the love of your life, and you don’t want to move away and risk losing her/him 8. You prefer the familiar to the unfamiliar

Blake Wrobbel

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

It’s not easy to give a definitive answer for if one should go to school far away or close to home. It really depends on what matters most to you. Some people love to the adventure of being in a place where they can start fresh. Some people want to be close to their parents and high school friends. Some people love (or hate) their home town, and there’s nothing wrong with that! Consider the following – Going to school close to home – 1. You’ll be able to see your parents on a regular basis. You’ll be able to take weekend trips for small holidays. Family can really ease the tension of school when things get tough. 2. You might go to school with friends you went to high school with, which can make the experience that much more fun. 3. You’ll likely be relatively (or very) familiar with the location and culture – some people do not like being the inexperienced “new” kid, and knowing about the local culture can set you apart as a good resource for people newer to the area, increasing your exposure which in this highly network driven world is a good thing. Moving far away for school – 1. You will experience the adventure of being immersed in a new city and culture. 2. You will meet an entirely different set of people. They’ll have different ideas and ideals, and it can be refreshing to be around a different group of people. 3. Traveling gives perspective. It allows you to see the world from another person’s eyes. It allows you to understand more about how the world works and how people interact, which will increase your tolerance and respect for others. It can also be very inspiring! 4. It can establish a feeling a pride and independence especially if it’s not common for people in your hometown to travel far away to go to school. 5. It’s a challenge to move – some people love that challenge.

Amanda Bate

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

That is a personal decision and only you will know if you are ready. Going far from home might give you an opportunity to reinvent yourself. The farther you go, the less likely you’ll run into people who knew your high school self. On the flip side, being close to home makes it easier if you need to connect with family and friends during the school year. If you have an emergency, it is easier for your parents to get to you, if you’re only an hour or so away.

Eric DoblerPresidentDobler College Consulting

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

This is a question I always turn back on the student to answer because there is no way for me to say which choice is a better one. However, what we can do is have an honest and open conversation about what you think are the positives and negatives of the situation. I think first you have to define what “far” is. Is it the other side of the country? How about another time zone? Another climate or region? Or is it just the next state over? Next, I think you need to think about how you relate to your family and your home life. I’ve known students who couldn’t wait to graduate from high school and take off on the college adventure only to realize they missed the familiarity of home, friends and their family. Others, took off and didn’t look back because they were okay with keeping up with people through email, the phone and Skype. Another consideration is cost. If you go far, you will need to live on campus (and I’m a big believer in living on campus regardless of where you go, but that’s a topic for another day) and you will have to think about how you will get home for holidays and breaks. If you are across the country, that could mean paying for multiple flights each year which is a cost you may not necessarily think about when you are looking at schools. If you were to stay close to home and actually live at home, you could save yourself quite a bit of money which might be used towards a car, or saved for graduate school. At the end of the day, there are several layers to this question, but they all begin with figuring out what is important to you first. Start there and the answer will reveal itself eventually.

Joyce Vining MorganFounder and college counselorEducational Transitions

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

If all things are equal it’s up to you, but know that your life will center more around college life than you can imagine. My daughter went to the college closest to home so she could come home on weekends, and – other than vacations – came home once (in four years) for a weekend – with laundry. She was too busy at school for all the other weekends, and we visited her when invited!

Joyce Vining MorganFounder and college counselorEducational Transitions

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

If all things are equal it’s up to you, but know that your life will center more around college life than you can imagine. My daughter went to the college closest to home so she could come home on weekends, and – other than vacations – came home once (in four years) for a weekend – with laundry. She was too busy at school for all the other weekends, and we visited her when invited!

Scott WhiteDirector of GuidanceMontclair High School

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

This differs by student. If you are adventurous, go away. You may not have this opportunity again.

王文君 June ScortinoPresidentIVY Counselors Network

match your goal and personality with the right school

for many students, independance is the key and physical distant is not the major factor. out of state applicants normally receive better chance for diversification purpose from admissions point of view.

王文君 June ScortinoPresidentIVY Counselors Network

match your goal and personality with the right school

for many students, independance is the key and physical distant is not the major factor. out of state applicants normally receive better chance for diversification purpose from admissions point of view.

Gail GoetzEducational ConsultantPrivate Practice

Location of school

It depends on the student. Some students need the safety net of being close to home and others need to be nearby due to other extenuating circumstances. However, if a student is willing to go farther, I always recommend it. It is such a learning and growing experience to experience life in a different part of the country and to also meet other students from all parts of the U.S.

Judy McNeely

Geographic distances from home

In the 29 years I have done college counseling, I have learned that the distance from home has little to do with the decision of where to attend. The best way to express this is to say that I have had students find the right college and then distances became of little import. When truly involved on campus, even if only a few hours from home, the frequency of trips home is minimal [generally at Dec. break and possibly spring break]. The students are now adults and starting life in their new geographic location.

Dr. Bruce NeimeyerCEO/PartnerGlobal College Search Associates, LLC

Should I stay or should I go?

This is another question that it so important to the critical building blocks of the college search and selection process. Students really need to be honest with themselves about what a comfortable distance from home would be for them. Keep in mind that your primary goal at college is to study and do well academically. School first and foremost should be about the learning. Everything comes after that. With this in mind, what do you do now to make yourself comfortable to study? Do you go to a coffee shop with low cool music playing and get yourself a latte before typing away at your next English composition? Or, do you lock yourself in a sound deprecated room in your house with a single study lamp pointing your attention at your computer to focus, focus, focus. Each of us seeks out that perfect learning environment so that we can get the deed done right? Distance from home should be treated in a similar fashion. For some students they are going to do their best if they remain at home and commute to their school. For others, the will draw a two to three hour radius around their home and decide that this is their maximum comfort zone. It presents them the ability to get home in a few hours and the ability to return to school when that homey affection starts to wear off. Finally for a group of students they will be happiest knowing that mom or dad are a plane ride away and showing up Saturday night unannounced at their residence hall room door will just not happen. The bottom line is that you should answer this question up front, know what you need and then when it comes to working at your education…..you will not have made your distance from home the real problem as to why you are unable to focus, study and complete your homework, class and ultimately your degree.

Helen H. ChoiOwnerAdmissions Mavens

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

Like most things in the college admissions journey — the answer is… it depends on your individual situation. Factors such as personal preference, family concerns, financial issues, quality of the school, and choice of major, and many more — all play a part in answering this question. A student must take a look at her priorities first in order to answer this question in a meaningful way.

Tracey EcholsCounselor

To be away or not to be away…that is the question

That is entirely up to you. Being away gives a student some independence while still being some what protected under the education/academic bubble. You’ll meet a lot of new people, learn about your environment and quite possibly open up more than you would if you stayed at home. However, if you’re a homebody, like your state school or city college,or the program that you’re interested in is at your local school, maybe staying home would be the best thing for you. You can gain your independence through other means and going away is a lot more challenging than some students think.

Tam Warner MintonConsultantCollege Adventures

Close or far?

The most important factor in choosing a college is its fit for a student, not its location or popularity. Remember, do not buy into the bumper sticker mentality! The ideal school may be close to home—or it could be in another state, even another country! Regardless of where the school is located, it should offer opportunities for intellectual growth, social experiences, and thinking critically. Warning! Just because your friend(s) are going to a particular college does not mean that you should. Most friends who attend school together have found other interests by the end of the first semester. Personalities develop significantly in college, and the right school will promote individual growth. Choosing a school because it is familiar or because your high school pals are going might prevent students from developing as independent, capable people with their own interests and passions. You are going to college to learn, and not just from books.

Tam Warner MintonConsultantCollege Adventures

Close or far?

The most important factor in choosing a college is its fit for a student, not its location or popularity. Remember, do not buy into the bumper sticker mentality! The ideal school may be close to home—or it could be in another state, even another country! Regardless of where the school is located, it should offer opportunities for intellectual growth, social experiences, and thinking critically. Warning! Just because your friend(s) are going to a particular college does not mean that you should. Most friends who attend school together have found other interests by the end of the first semester. Personalities develop significantly in college, and the right school will promote individual growth. Choosing a school because it is familiar or because your high school pals are going might prevent students from developing as independent, capable people with their own interests and passions. You are going to college to learn, and not just from books.

Ed GarciaAssistant Professor/CounselorAustin Community College

Stay close?

A classic question. Is it better to stay closer to home, or go far away when you are deciding to pursue higher education? Each scenario presents unique advantages and disadvantages. There are some students who prefer to stay local for a variety of different reasons. Those reasons could include cost, strong family ties, or maybe they have to since they have other responsibilities that they need to tend to. On the other hand, some students might be coming from a better financial situations and might be able to go to school far away (in this statement you can hear my bias). I grew up in the southern California area and I was fortunate to have lots of higher education options. In some other states the nearest institution of higher education (IHE) might be hours away. Then we get into the definition of what is “far.” For some students far might be an hour away, for others it might be more than 6 hours. Truth be told a lot of the questions that are posed on Unigo really do not have a “right” or “wrong” answer since each students situation is unique. Instead of focusing on how far or close a university is I would encourage students to explore the institutions of higher education (IHE’s) that they are considering and then make the appropriate choice. For me personally I decided to stay close to home, but live on campus. I was 30 minutes away from home in case I needed to go back on the weekends, and I was also close enough to receive family support. At the same time I lived on campus and this allowed me an opportunity to grow, learn, and experience life on my own. I believe I got the best of both worlds. Attending college is going to be a unique experience you will always remember just make sure that you are attending an IHE for the right reasons, and by all means, please make sure they have the program of study that you are interested in.

Erin AveryCertified Educational PlannerAvery Educational Resources, LLC

Location Location Location

Are you a homebody? Do you want your laundry done weekly? Are you adventurous? Do you like to take risks? Do you enjoy travel? Do you need distance from your family to grow into your own person? I personally always admire students that choose a different culture or geographic location than their own for their four years of college. It speaks to the student’s ability to move outside of their comfort zone. This risk reaps substantial rewards.

Karen Ekman-BaurDirector of College CounselingLeysin American School

Close to Home or Far Away

This question is a tricky one. A student should ultimately be comfortable with the decision he/she makes, but it can be a good idea to reach out of one’s “comfort zone”. This goes for parents, too, who sometimes need to learn to let go. A student may be better able to expand his/her horizons when not attending college so close to home. There are a lot of factors that would have to be considered, though – finances, travel issues, opportunities close to home, family needs, etc.

Karen Ekman-BaurDirector of College CounselingLeysin American School

Close to Home or Far Away

This question is a tricky one. A student should ultimately be comfortable with the decision he/she makes, but it can be a good idea to reach out of one’s “comfort zone”. This goes for parents, too, who sometimes need to learn to let go. A student may be better able to expand his/her horizons when not attending college so close to home. There are a lot of factors that would have to be considered, though – finances, travel issues, college/university opportunities close to home, family needs, etc.

Ellen [email protected]OwnerEllen Richards Admissions Consulting

Location, location, location.

It’s improtant to know in which environments you thrive. Do you need the hustle of a big city to stimulate you, or do you focus well someplace serene and removed? Staying close to home can have benefits both financial and academic – many students will attest to saving money by living at home and making impressive grades without being distracted by the excitement of a freshman dorm. However, equal numbers will claim that exercising their independence by moving away from home was very benificial to their overall maturity. All of these factors can have an overwhelming affect on your experience as a student, and must be considered. However…Do not choose your college because it is close to the beach, has great weather, offers skiing as a minor, or despite not having anything academic to offer you, is in a city you’ve always loved. none of the above will benefit you in the long run.

Laura O’Brien GatzionisFounderEducational Advisory Services

Home Sweet Home or Far Far Away…

You need to have some self-knowledge to figure this one out. I know some students who live on campus at a college close to home who rarely see their parents, and others who feel the need to drive home often to have a home-cooked meal or do laundry. You may decide to live at home in order to save on the room and board costs. Or, it may be that you will receive a better financial aid package if you move out of your geographical area and bring some much needed geographical diversity to a campus further away. This will be one of the many considerations as you are looking at schools.

Nancy MilneOwnerMilne Collegiate Consulting

Distance between home and school

Whether you attend school in your “backyard” or fly to the other side of the country, is a completely personal decision. Some students are ready to experience the independence that distance will dictate. Others may feel better, knowing that they can still go home for Sunday supper. For some folks there is the thrill of experiencing a different climate/culture/etc.; while others are more comfortable with what they know. There are a lot of schools out there and everyone is looking for the one that feels right to them.

Helen Cella

Is it better to stick close to home or go to school far away?

It depends on the students family and financial situation

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