Is the SAT still as important as it used to be? If so, how?

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Is the SAT still as important as it used to be? If so, how?

Zahir RobbCollege CounselorThe Right Fit College

Is the SAT still as important as it used to be? If so, how?

According to college admission officers, the SAT still remains near the top of factors in admission to a campus. However, there are a rising number of test optional campuses which can be found by visiting fairtest.org. I always encourage students to take both the SAT and ACT as you never want to limit your options moving forward. If you struggle, you can always apply test optional in the future.

Reecy ArestyCollege Admissions/Financial Aid Expert & AuthorPayless For College, Inc.

Is the SAT still as important as it used to be? If so, how?

No. Many schools don’t even require it, but most do. it’s still one of their favorite ways to evaluate students.

Sheila Smith

Is the SAT still as important as it used to be? If so, how?

If you’re looking for financial assistance, definitely. SAT scores play a role in decisions about merit-based scholarships—even at some test-optional institutions. Decisions about awarding merit scholarships usually include an evaluation of a student’s high school grades in conjunction with his or her test scores. Some merit scholarships just have a baseline cut-off: If a candidate has a GPA that’s above X combined with an SAT or ACT score better than Y, then he or she is automatically granted the scholarship.

Sharon Smith

Is the SAT still as important as it used to be? If so, how?

Even “score optional” schools don’t let applicants off the standardized-test hook entirely. Many of these colleges require a battery of other scores (usually AP or SAT II subject tests) to make up for the absence of SAT or ACT results. While the precise role of SAT scores in the admissions process varies from school to school, the general consensus is that test scores do play an important role in the decision-making process at most institutions. With that said, they’re not nearly as critical as your high school transcript. Admissions officers want applicants who have taken a challenging curriculum and excelled at those courses. They’re also looking for students who have interesting extracurricular activities and stellar recommendations.

David Smith

Is the SAT still as important as it used to be? If so, how?

Those involved in the admissions process claim standardized tests give them information other metrics can’t, namely, how a student measures up to candidates from other high schools. That said, SAT scores are always looked at in conjunction with the rest of a student’s application—not as a separate, free-standing indicator of academic success. A high SAT score can serve as a sort of tie-breaker in the application process. If there are two students who have the same grades, equivalent extracurricular activities, similar backgrounds, and the same caliber of recommendations, schools will go with the candidate with the higher score. This is partially due to a genuine belief among colleges that the SAT does measure something useful. It might also have something to do with the fact that median test scores for admitted students are one measure used by college rankings. Whatever the motive, the bottom line is that a better SAT score can certainly give an applicant the leg up in the tough college-admissions process.

Nancy Smith

Is the SAT still as important as it used to be? If so, how?

Over 800 four-year colleges don’t require SAT or ACT scores at all. That number is growing and now includes some top-notch liberal arts institutions. College admissions officers swear up, down, and sideways that they care more about an applicant’s grades, recommendations, essays, extracurricular activities, and pet fish Murray than they do about his or her test scores. So no, I don’t think they matter as much now as they used to, but I still recommend every student take them. Sure, SAT scores aren’t the end all be all of college admissions—but they still remain an important part of the process.

Richard Smith

Is the SAT still as important as it used to be? If so, how?

They do and applicants should still plan to sacrifice at least one Saturday morning of their junior or senior year to the standardized testing gods. The vast majority of schools still requires an SAT or ACT score from each applicant. And among the best schools in the country, only a few are “score optional.” Nineteen of the top 25 liberal arts schools, and all of the top 25-ranked national universities (as ranked by US News & World Report) still require standardized test scores. For applicants looking at public universities, almost all the flagship campuses of the best state schools ask applicants to submit SAT or ACT score.

Nina BerlerFounderunCommon Apps

Is the SAT still as important as it used to be? If so, how?

I have had this conversation with admissions professionals, and they tend to think that the SAT isn’t as important as it used to be. There is so much information on each candidate that the SAT is but one piece of data. Most colleges look at the transcript first and look for a progression of difficulty from year to year. Course selection and success in courses really matters most. Some colleges (e.g., NYU) are now SAT optional because they have so much information on a given student. I want to make sure that students know what to expect on the SAT but that they can show a target school that they have a strong transcript and a few activities about which they are passionate. Between those items, recommendations and essays, colleges are armed with information.

王文君 June ScortinoPresidentIVY Counselors Network

It is not the number one ticket to college admissions

SAT is used alone with other accomplishments subjected to different applicant pools. SAT is also normally used for scholarships. the studen’ts GPA is the single most important evidence alone with the curriculum selection and challenges of the courses.

王文君 June ScortinoPresidentIVY Counselors Network

It is not the number one ticket to college admissions

SAT is used alone with other accomplishments subjected to different applicant pools. SAT is also normally used for scholarships. the studen’ts GPA is the single most important evidence alone with the curriculum selection and challenges of the courses.

王文君 June ScortinoPresidentIVY Counselors Network

It is not the number one ticket to college admissions

SAT is used alone with other accomplishments subjected to different applicant pools. SAT is also normally used for scholarships. the studen’ts GPA is the single most important evidence alone with the curriculum selection and challenges of the courses.

Megan DorseySAT Prep & College AdvisorCollege Prep LLC

For Most Students, It’s as Important as Ever!

In the 20 years I have worked in the field of test prep, I’ve frequently heard speculation that the SAT is going away. For good or bad, the SAT is still an important part of the college admission process. There are more selective schools (as opposed to open-admission schools) joining the test-optional movement every year. But unless your entire college list is made up of these institutions, your scores still matter for general college admission, admission to honors programs, and scholarship applications. For most students, SAT scores are still important, so take some steps to maximize your scores.

Jolyn BrandOwner/DirectorBrand College Consulting

The SAT is even more important

Colleges are getting more and more applicants every year. They can now use SAT test scores and GPAs to determine which students to accept each year. Students need to prepare for the SAT and the ACT. Read, study and take it again if necessary.

Helen H. ChoiOwnerAdmissions Mavens

Is the SAT still as important as it used to be? If so, how?

The SAT (along with the ACT) is still pretty important when it comes to college admissions. However, there is a growing list of colleges (many of them highly selective) which are now test optional. “Test optional” means that they do not require students to submit their standardized test scores. For a list of schools which are currently test optional, go to http://fairtest.org/university/optional. Some of the most selective test optional schools include Bowdoin College and Smith College.

Ellen [email protected]OwnerEllen Richards Admissions Consulting

Standardized testing in need of serious review

For years, students applying to college have taken standardized tests that are sent to colleges to be considered as part of their applications. In the past decades, these tests have come to the forefront of a debate on their necessity fairness and relevance. Standardized tests treat students like the machines used to grade them – as though people were designed to function at the push of a button. Standardized test makers assume that students all fit into a mold and work against students who are “wired” a bit differently. Students who do not think the way the test makers expect have an extreme disadvantage. In order to remain a relevant aspect of the college admissions process, standardized tests must be considered in conjunction with other factors. In addition to the concern students have about their college applications, standardized testing can damage students in pervasive ways. The term “test preparation” is equated with “studying.” The concept that students don’t “study,” but instead “prepare” for these tests, undermines students’ ability to focus on their real education. While preparing for a standardized test that offers them no lasting benefit beyond strategies specific to the test, students lose focus on their schoolwork and lose sight of what really matters. Resulting from a myopic perspective that influences students to place more importance on the test than necessary, students rob themselves of the opportunity to explore their innate talents and aspirations. Focusing on achieving a score that grants a student entrée into a particular school does not prepare them to function once they get there. While test scores remain a necessary evil when striving to gain admission to all private middle and high schools as well as college, students should not sacrifice self-knowledge and personal goal-setting on the altar of the perfect test score. These tests have morphed from providing a measure of intelligence and academic achievement into a testament to how well a student prepares and conforms to universal guidelines. A drastic shift in attitude towards standardized testing has occurred in the last few years. Many thirty-somethings recall the time when no students studied for standardized tests – they simply showed up for the test and took it. Done. Over. No questions asked. As a result, the test scores functioned as an accurate assessment of a student’s problem-solving ability because the test takers were on an even playing field. Today, test-taking strategies as and test prep companies make sure the results provide detail about how well students can memorize, and, frankly, the size of their parents’ bank account, considering the amount of money most invested in the process. Those students will perform better because they are coached, not necessarily because they know the material. In fact, one could argue that test scores often separate the “haves” from the “have-nots.” The bottom line: students are judged based on their scores. Some assume poor performance on standardized tests account for laziness or their lack of ability. Perhaps a better alternative to measure students would be to offer and assessment at the beginning of the school year and again at the end, such a system could not only gauge how much the student learned during the year, but could serve as an assessment of the school’s performance, as well. As it stands, standardized tests do not predict a student’s success in school or in life – so we must ask ourselves, “What is the point?” As parents, educators and future employers, we need to know if a student is an intelligent, well-rounded problem solver. If standardized tests are to maintain any sort of efficacy, they must be updated to a format that reflects how students learn today, as well as how well they will perform tomorrow.

Jolyn BrandOwner & CEOBrand College Consulting

Yes, test scores are still very important!

Especially in larger colleges, an applicant’s test scores are still very crucial. If a student didn’t do as well as he hoped for, some colleges will overlook that with a great GPA and overall well-rounded application (activities, community service, sports, etc). But, for most students, the higher those test scores, the better!

Bill PrudenHead of Upper School, College CounselorRavenscroft School

The Importance of the SAT: What Does the Institution Need?

Nothing induces greater fear in the heart of a college applicant than the SATs and yet increasingly they are less about the applicant than they are about the school and its interests. The SAT has lost its primacy as its one time monopoly like status has faded as ACT has become increasingly popular and accepted. Too, the clear evidence that focused test preparation and courses can improve scores makes it less reliable as a predictor of college performance. Now more than ever before the value of the SAT lies in the way it can be marketed by schools as a testament to the strength of their student body. In the end while they remain a singular part of the process their true importance varies widely.

Rana SlosbergOwnerSlosberg College Solutions LLC

SAT importance

The SAT or ACT scores are generally a very important part of the application. However, they are not as important as they used to be because now over 850 four year colleges have gone test-optional. For a list of these colleges, see http://www.fairtest.org/.

Nicholas Umphrey

SAT relevance

I have my own personal opinions about the SAT (and ACT for that matter) and what it measures and how it applies to college success. All assessments measure something and they provide data and numbers so that colleges can attempt to gauge a student’s collegiate potential. However, there are exceptions to every rule. Almost all educators cannot get through college without learning about Howard Gardner’s Multiple Intelligence Theory. Gardner believes that eight abilities meet these criteria: Spatial, Linguistic, Logical-mathematical, Bodily-kinesthetic, Musical, Interpersonal, Intrapersonal, and Naturalistic. I am a big believer in this theory and as a school counselor, I can apply these types to individual students. The SAT and ACT only measure a couple of these. They are, I will admit, important aptitudes to have when entering college. My issue with standardized tests is that it convinces kids they are not smart enough for college. For example, an artistic student may have great spatial and kinesthetic intelligence in creating art, but the SAT may convince them to forget about university and join the Navy. In essence, the SAT allows colleges to compare a student from Bangor, Maine with a student from San Diego, CA with hard data and numbers. However, if you look at these two hypothetical students one may have a 3.0 average and good recommendations, while the other may have a 2.0 and luke-warm recommendations. Guess which student admissions counselors will choose? The SAT measures potential, but grades and your established track record as a student and person will prove to be most crucial to your admission decision..

Jessica BrondoFounder and CEOThe Edge in College Prep

Is the SAT still as important as it used to be? If so, how?

While more and more American colleges and universities are implementing test-optional policies for admissions, acknowledging that test scores do not necessarily correlate with college success, the SAT remains incredibly important to gaining admission to top tier colleges. Regardless of whether or not a student’s dream school requires the SAT, high scores can only have a positive impact on the student’s chances of admission.

Helen Cella

Is the SAT still as important as it used to be? If so, how?

More and more schools are not requiring them

Mike KentFounder / DirectorCollegeMax Counseling

Is the SAT still as important as it used to be? If so, how?

Like it or not, many colleges do rely on standardized tests as one of the top three criteria for admissions according to NACAC, a national college advising organization. That said, individual colleges and universities treat the tests differently. Some are test-optional and don’t even consider them much. Remember though, that the SAT and ACT still serve an important function, and that is as a means to evaluating students on a level playing field across so many different high schools across the country. They also serve can serve a purpose when it comes to things like scholarship consideration and course placement. Bottom line is that you should always do as well as you can on the SAT or ACT, but remember that it is only one criterion for admission.

Mike KentFounder / DirectorCollegeMax Counseling

Is the SAT still as important as it used to be? If so, how?

Like it or not, many colleges do rely on standardized tests as one of the top three criteria for admissions according to NACAC, a national college advising organization. That said, individual colleges and universities treat the tests differently. Some are test-optional and don’t even consider them much. Remember though, that the SAT and ACT still serve an important function, and that is as a means to evaluating students on a level playing field across so many different high schools across the country. They also serve can serve a purpose when it comes to things like scholarship consideration and course placement. Bottom line is that you should always do as well as you can on the SAT or ACT, but remember that it is only one criterion for admission.

Mike KentFounder / DirectorCollegeMax Counseling

Is the SAT still as important as it used to be? If so, how?

Like it or not, many colleges do rely on standardized tests as one of the top three criteria for admissions according to NACAC, a national college advising organization. That said, individual colleges and universities treat the tests differently. Some are test-optional and don’t even consider them much. Remember though, that the SAT and ACT still serve an important function, and that is as a means to evaluate students on a level playing field across so many different high schools across the country. They also serve a purpose when it comes to things like scholarship consideration and course placement. Bottom line is that you should always do as well as you can on the SAT or ACT, but remember that it is only one criterion for admission.

Mike KentFounder / DirectorCollegeMax Counseling

Is the SAT still as important as it used to be? If so, how?

Like it or not, many colleges do rely on standardized tests as one of the top three criteria for admissions according to NACAC, a national college advising organization. That said, individual colleges and universities treat the tests differently. Some are test-optional and don’t even consider them much. Remember though, that the SAT and ACT still serve an important function, and that is as a means to evaluate students on a level playing field across so many different high schools across the country. They also serve a purpose when it comes to things like scholarship consideration and course placement. Bottom line is that you should always do as well as you can on the SAT or ACT, but remember that it is only one criterion for admission.

Andrew Hill

Is the SAT still as important as it used to be? If so, how?

Absolutely. The SAT is the most taken college admissions test in the world. It is a standard that is extremely valuable because of this. Some states and countries use it as a proficiency exam to exit high school. The new writing section is valuable to admissions as well. This allows for a writing sample in a standardized condition and allows for a check against the regular essays to see if they are actually the student’s own. It is also a very pure way to get a glimpse of how one is as a writer. There is a saying on the East Coast that if you want to go to a “real school” you take the SAT.

Reecy ArestyCollege Admissions/Financial Aid Expert & AuthorPayless For College, Inc.

Is the SAT still as important as it used to be? If so, how?

Sorry, but I’m not an SAT expert. Seek out someone who has vast experience on the subject.

Karen Ekman-BaurDirector of College CounselingLeysin American School

Is the SAT still as important as it used to be? If so, how?

There are a variety of answers to this question: At many institutions, the SAT (or the ACT) continues to constitute a very important part of the admissions application package. It is felt that, in order to work successfully in the challenging higher education environments of those institutions, a student must demonstrate mastery of the type of material which appears on these standardized tests. At some schools, international or non-native English speakers are expected to exhibit results on the SAT or ACT comparable to native English speakers, the rationale being that in order to perform successfully at those colleges/universities, all students need to have mastered a certain level of English. Some institutions evaluate the SAT or ACT results of non-native English speakers on a different scale or do not require those standardized test results at all, instead offering students the opportunity to submit TOEFL or IELTS results, instead. English support services are typically offered at schools with this policy. Recently, some schools have made the determination not to require SAT or ACT test results of any of their applicants, feeling that the results are culturally biased and do not accurately predict a student’s likelihood of academic success. As you see, there is a wide range of opinion on this topic.

Carita Del ValleFounderAcademic Decisions

Is the SAT still as important as it used to be? If so, how?

Yes, the SAT is extremely important in today’s admissions game. Not only is it tied to entrance into the various programs across the country, there is a direct relation to the amount of merit aid you may receive because of your testing numbers. That being said also take note of various college and universities that are testing optional or no testing at all. If this is the place for you, then taking a SAT may not be the best use of your time.

Annie ReznikCounselor/CEOCollege Guidance Coach

Is the SAT still as important as it used to be? If so, how?

In some ways, the SAT is as important as ever. It still represents just one of two tools (ACT being the other) college admission offices can use to academically compare students from different high schools. The void created by the absence of any universality with regards to course offerings, requirements, and grading in high schools is still filled reasonably well through standardized tests. However, most colleges and universities conduct full-file, holistic review processes in which the SAT (or ACT) is just one factor among many in determining admission offers. One sign that points to the SAT’s diminished value in the admissions landscape: an increasing number of schools enable students to opt out of submitting standardized test scores. Fair Test (www.fairtest.org) maintains a complete list of schools that have optional test score policies.

Nancy MilneOwnerMilne Collegiate Consulting

Is the SAT still as important as it used to be? If so, how?

The SAT is still required for admission to a number of schools. Depending on the institution, more or less weight may be given to your score. Research continues to demonstrate there are issues with standardized tests, that can’t be ignored. For this reason, the list of test optional schools continues to grow (see FairTest.org). At some schools, SAT scores may factor in to merit aid awards.

Tam Warner MintonConsultantCollege Adventures

Is the SAT still as important as it used to be? If so, how?

At some colleges, yes, standardized testing is still very important. It doesn’t matter if you take the SAT or the ACT for the most part, either is acceptable. So many colleges are going test optional because standardized testing really doesn’t represent your ability in school as much as it represents how well you can take a test. Many colleges do not require standardized tests anymore for this reason. Of course, colleges are penalized in the rankings when they don’t report test scores (but don’t worry much about rankings anyway!). Check out www.fairtest.org.

Patricia KrahnkePresident/PartnerGlobal College Search Associates, LLC

Is the SAT still as important as it used to be? If so, how?

Short Answer: It becoming less and less important, but most institution still require the SAT. The more interesting question is, How important is it to you to accept being part of this machine that doesn’t view you as a person, but only accepts or rejects you as a set of numbers. Detailed Answer: Does the SAT Accurately Predict Success? The following is from fairtest.org: “Validity research at individual institutions illustrates the weak predictive ability of the SAT. One study (J. Baron & M. F. Norman in Educational and Psychology Measurement) at the University of Pennsylvania looked at the power of high school class rank, SAT I, and SAT II in predicting cumulative college GPAs. “Researchers found that the SAT I was by far the weakest predictor, explaining only 4% of the variation in college grades, while SAT II scores accounted for 6.8% of the differences in academic performance. By far the most useful tool proved to be class rank, which predicted 9.3% of the changes in cumulative GPAs. Combining SAT I scores and class rank inched this figure up to 11.3%, leaving almost 90% of the variation in grades unexplained.” from FairTest.org There are some trends and truths regarding standardized testing and college admissions that may help students and families manage the high-stakes anxiety surrounding performance on the SATs: There is a great deal of controversy about the ability of the SATs to predict accurately first-year college success; repeatedly it has been determined that the best indicator of success in the classroom is past success in the classroom; therefore, many colleges are returning to a holistic approach to admissions, focusing on academic achievement as reflected in grades, GPA, rigor of academic coursework, etc.; As a result of this, many of the top colleges and universities nationwide have made a decision to make optional the submission of standardized test scores such as the SAT and ACT; many of those that have not yet decided to make them optional are seriously considering doing so. Almost 850 colleges and universities in the U.S. no longer require submission of SAT or ACT scores for the application process (many of them are top colleges), and more and more colleges and universities are moving in that direction Students often perform better on the ACT than on the SAT (particularly students with learning disabilities and students whose knowledge is more contextual than multiple choice); because most institutions accept scores from both tests (see the ACT/SAT Concordance for the comparison between scores), many students hedge their bets by taking both tests Important Note About the Use of Standardized Test Scores in College Marketing Even colleges that no longer require the submission of standardized test scores during the admission process buy names of students from the College Board. In other words, the mail that you receive from various colleges is being sent to you because the colleges have purchased your name from the College Board (or ACT) at the earliest time it becomes available to the testing organizations to sell, usually when the student has taken the PSAT. (Where does the money go, including your SAT fees? See College Board Leader Paid More Than Harvard’s) Your name was chosen for purchase for many reasons in addition to a certain type of test score, including your willingness to move out of state (in-state tuition does not cover the cost of a student’s education, so colleges and universities must attract out-of-state students.) Colleges purchase the names of test takers in an attempt to reach out to students at the first date possible, usually in January of the sophomore year of high school, which is when the PSAT names become available. This is why your sophomore student may suddenly receive (literally overnight) emails and mailings from many colleges: the colleges have their messages prepared and automated to be sent to students the moment the email data is received by their computer systems. This marketing process is designed to attract as many responses as possible. Their hope is that as you pursue your college search, they will have been able to gain your undivided attention from the beginning. In turn, they hope that they will eventually receive an application from you and an application fee, because: The more applications they attract, the more students they can deny; The more students they deny, the more selective they appear to the college rankings publications, such as U.S. News; The more selective they appear, the higher they climb in the rankings; The higher they climb in the rankings, the more desirable they appear to future prospective students — and to their Board of Trustees, Board of Governors, and alumni who give money to their alma mater So the answer to this question is, many colleges still rely on these scores as part of their algorithm in determining your admissibility. But many colleges are no longer requiring them.

Jenn CohenOwnerJenn Cohen Tutoring

Is the SAT still as important as it used to be? If so, how?

Yes! And no. While grades and course selection are paramount, the SAT (and its counterpart the ACT) still plays an important role in the admissions process at colleges nationwide. It provides additional information about a student’s abilities to admissions officers. Testing is intended to supplement grades and essentially “level the playing field” for students attending disparate high schools across the country. While there’s certainly room for discussion as to whether the SAT succeeds in that goal, it’s a fact that it’s going to be a part of most students’ applications in the end. The vast majority of college bound students take either the SAT or ACT, and that’s not going to change any time soon. The “no” part of my answer addresses the current movement of test optional colleges. The list of colleges that no longer require test scores to be submitted grows every year, and there are some surprisingly well-known names on the list. While I do think having the opportunity to opt not to submit test scores can open up opportunities for some students whose grades and test scores don’t “match,” I’m not convinced that the colleges in question are allowing it for noble reasons. Even if a school is test optional, students with strong test scores will submit those scores anyway to support their application. Those with lower scores will obviously be less likely to include them. While the lower scoring students may still be admitted, the school’s published average test scores will increase! This means that a school can appear to be more selective, garner higher rankings, and ultimately discourage lower scoring students from applying at all. And there is no obligation on the school’s part to admit any students who choose not to submit their scores. It’s a bit of a slippery slope, and I’m not sure it’s going to benefit students in the end.

Tennille RaneyFounderDevelop Your Dreams

Is the SAT still as important as it used to be? If so, how?

I’ll let you in on a little secret…..SAT/ACT scores are extremely important to most colleges, but not all of them. Not all students are alike and neither are colleges. Some students can get a high score on the SAT with little preparation. I’ve known a few students that partied the night before and were still able to submit impressive scores to the college of their choice. Then there are those who have taken countless test prep courses and have studied for years, but still can’t seem to get their scores as high as they would like. Take heart my mediocre, test-taking brethren. This list is for you. Check out this list of schools that accept students despite what the dreaded test scores say: http://fairtest.org/university/optional (The listing has been created by the National Center for Fair and Open Testing. There is no affiliation with unigo.com)

Tennille RaneyFounderDevelop Your Dreams

Is the SAT still as important as it used to be? If so, how?

I’ll let you in on a little secret…..SAT/ACT scores are extremely important to most colleges, but not all of them. Not all students are alike and neither are colleges. Some students can get a high score on the SAT with little preparation. I’ve known a few students that partied the night before and were still able to submit impressive scores to the college of their choice. Then there are those who have taken countless test prep courses and have studied for years, but still can’t seem to get their scores as high as they would like. Take heart my mediocre, test-taking brethren. This list is for you. Check out this list of schools that accept students despite what the dreaded test scores say: http://fairtest.org/university/optional (The listing has been created by the National Center for Fair and Open Testing. There is no affiliation with unigo.com)

Pamela Hampton-GarlandOwnerScholar Bound

The importance of SAT/ACT

Yes, the SAT/ACT are very important they are still used as part of the entry requirements for many institutions and the scores on these test along with your academic performance overall, and your responses to essay questions are factored into a rubric to determine your admission into most schools. Do not take the test lightly, some schools only look at the numbers and others are more holisitic, but almost all require the test as a part of the admission package.

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