Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

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Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

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Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

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Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

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Stephanie Lefler

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

Benefits of going to an in-state school are that you are closer to home! You don’t have to find a way to squeeze everything into your dorm. If you live close enough, going home on weekends just to get away or to pick up some needed things is so convenient. You get the best of both worlds, living away from home, but close enough to go back whenever you want. Some drawbacks may be that you want new surroundings and you want to experience an environment that is completely different than you did at home. I have friends from out of state and they love going to different festivals and things around the city just to learn more and experience all these new things that they find super exciting.

Jolyn BrandOwner/DirectorBrand College Consulting

In state versus out of state

Some of the benefits to going to an in-state college are proximity to home, lower travel expenses, the ability to go home for holidays, and being able to see family and friends more often. Some of the benefits to going to an out-of-state college is the new climate, culture and perspectives you may encounter.

Amy FeinsownerAMF College Consulting

Get out of town!

College might be your ONLY chance to live/work/play in a different part of the country, or a different climate or time zone. Did you grow up in a suburb? Want to try the big city without making a big committment? Getting out of state can really fill the bill for many of these scenarios. Going to school out of state will also expose you to students from different parts of the country and the world. Diversity can be a great learning tool, and you might learn a lot more about yourself than you would if you stick close to home with the same type of kids you’ve always known. College is about taking risks in a safe environment….so if you want to risk a cold winter, or the mountains, or NYC, then going to school out of state might be the answer. On the flip side, maybe you’re not ready to go too far from home. You might have family obligations, or you just need a couple more years to really mature before you go too far away. If that’s the case, then staying in state is probably a better choice, but you can still try to get out of your comfort zone by choosing a school with a different ethnic or socio-economic makeup than your high school. It’s all about the right fit, but don’t forget that even those really comfy Ugg boots wear thin after a while, and sometimes its a good idea to try a new style or color and find out that what you THOUGHT was your “right fit” might not be exactly what you needed after all.

Nina BerlerFounderunCommon Apps

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

More than ever before, internships are very important. If a student wants to settle in his or her home state, that college’s ties in the community or in other cities in that state could be instrumental in setting that student up to begin his or her professional life.

Suzanne ShafferOwnerParents Countdown to College Coach

Staying close to home could help or hinder

Statistics show that most students stay within 50 miles of home when going to college. Being close to home can be a benefit or a draw back. On the one hand, it allows the student to travel home often. On the other hand, it discourages independence and could keep the student dependent on their parents. Consider carefully the decision to remain in-state, especially when discounting other private colleges that might offer better aid packages to students out of their area.

Carita Del ValleFounderAcademic Decisions

Wisconsin is very different from California and there is no In-N-Out Burger!

When students look to another state for their college destination, they often overlook the cultural and political differences the region has to offer, and how it is often vastly different from their own neighborhood. For many, this is a new chapter in their life and they look forward to the change in people, languages, politics, food choices, as well as social causes they will be exposed to. Yet for other students, deciding to stay close to home can provide a sense of comfort by understanding what they already have grown up with in order to provide less distractions from the rigorous coursework they are going to embark upon.

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王文君 June ScortinoPresidentIVY Counselors Network

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

Benefit: less home sick, more local friends Drawbacks: big campus is not for everyone even out-of-state, limited aid, and less diversification.

Maura KastbergExecutive Director of Student ServicesRSC

In State vs. Out of State Colleges

Tuition differences aside attending college in state is usually beneficial in a number of ways. A local college saves you travel time and money, plus it allows you to enjoy contact with your family, and continue to share values and interests within your state. An out of state college challenges you with sudden independence, long term separation from family, unfamiliar locations and new experiences with different cultures and climates. Many students who attend colleges far from home end up transferring back. Students need to consider how far from home seems best for them, or how much of a challenge they can handle.

Suzan ReznickIndependent Educational ConsultantThe College Connection

Play it safe or be more of a risk-taker?

Going farther from home, for college, will require you to become more independent and self-sufficient. It will not be so easy for your parents to resolve whatever issues or problems that will crop up during your college years. You will also more likely be exposed to students that may be very different from you either racially, religiously and/or in their political beliefs. Are you prepared to take on those types of challenges? Also, the farther away you attend school the less likely that you will be able to come home often for visits .In fact, if you require a plane to return home, you may only get to see your family a few times a year for the major holidays. For many students, and their parents, this might not be an acceptable option. Determining the “right” distance to go from home is just one of the many factors that need to be considered in judging where to apply.

William Chichester

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

Pro of In-State – closer to home in case you get homesick…lower travel costs Out of State – away from family (could be a good thing)

Megan DorseySAT Prep & College AdvisorCollege Prep LLC

Pros and Cons Depend on You

There are exceptional schools in state or out of state, no matter where you live. What you consider a benefit or drawback of a locale depends on your personality and interests. • Staying closer to home can save you on travel, shipping costs, and other expenses. • Going further away may expose you to more diversity in race, economic status, cultural traditions, and scenery. • In-state means you can go home more often. • Out-of-state means you get to explore new places. • In-state means you’ll likely know other students (often your roommate) right away. • Out-of-state means you’ll make new friends. There is safety and security in-state, but moving out-of-state can be exciting and stimulating…the choice is yours.

Megan DorseySAT Prep & College AdvisorCollege Prep LLC

Pros and Cons Depend on You

There are exceptional schools in state or out of state, no matter where you live. What you consider a benefit or drawback of a locale depends on your personality and interests. • Staying closer to home can save you on travel, shipping costs, and other expenses. • Going further away may expose you to more diversity in race, economic status, cultural traditions, and scenery. • In-state means you can go home more often. • Out-of-state means you get to explore new places. • In-state means you’ll likely know other students (often your roommate) right away. • Out-of-state means you’ll make new friends. There is safety and security in-state, but moving out-of-state can be exciting and stimulating…the choice is yours.

Lisa HatchIndependent College CounselorCollege Primers

In-State vs. Out-of-State

If you’re lucky (and capable!) enough to secure admission to both in and out-of-state schools, you’ll find yourself faced with another dilemma in the seemingly never-ending college decision process. Which option is the better choice for you? Tuition aside, you’ll want to devote heavy consideration to what type of environment and overall learning experience meets your needs. If you think you’ll benefit from the challenge of taking on the unknown, going away to school can help you grow in confidence and independence in ways that can’t always be assigned monetary value. Aside from helping you prepare for future career success, the college experience is a critical part of the passage from adolescence and adulthood, and the forced independence that attending an out-of-state school requires can be an invaluable asset as you move forward with your adult life. That being said, however, before you make your decision, try looking at in-state schools through different eyes. Don’t discount a particular school just because you feel you know it too well or it’s too close to your parents’ home. Remember, many students who attend an out-of-state school end up returning home before earning their degrees, and many students who attend in-state schools rarely see their nearby families. So, just because you stay closer to home doesn’t mean you’ll completely lose out on the opportunity to grow into an independent adult. Attending college in your home state provides you with access to a support system that may be crucial to your college success. If you think that being closer to your family support system will enhance your college experience, you’ll probably do better attending college in your state, especially if you’re also trying to overcome learning differences or other difficulties. The bottom line is, whether you attend an in or out-of-state establishment is hardly as important as whether you attend a school where you feel happy, comfortable, and challenged in your environment – wherever that may be.

Steve PeiferDirector of College GuidanceRift Valley Academy

Advantages and Disadvantages

The greatest benefit of staying in state is that you have a network already established. Depending on the student, it is usually broadening to go beyond your state’s borders.

Patricia AviezerPresidentInside Track To College, Inc.

It’s All About What Works For You

Well working in a state that offers a great scholarship program, this question comes up all the time. If a student could receive a scholarship that pays for 100% of their tuition with a 3.5 GPA and 1280 on the SAT’s, why would they consider other options? So here are the BENEFITS of attending your State College! 1. So close to home that I commute, saving dorm and food costs. 2. I can come home when I want without paying for a plane ticket. 3. Some of my high school friends will be attending the same college and we study well together and I won’t feel so alone in this new setting. 4. I’ll graduate owing very little in loans and can use my savings for graduate school. 5. I’ve graduated in the top 5% from my “very good” high school and know I can compete academically with students from my own state. There are many more reasons, but let’s look at the DRAWBACKS and why you might look into an Out-of-State College. 1. This out-of-state college graduates 80% of entering students within 4 years, my state schools are quoting 6-year graduation rates. 2. The graduation rate of these our-of-state universities are over 85%, my state loses 48% of entering students by sophomore year. 3. I get to exercise my academic interests and explore my options with a population of students with a “different mind set” since they’re not from my state. 4. Since they’re interested in attracting students from all 50 states and countries from around the world and my academics are excellent and scores are top-notch, there are scholarships available to me. 5. “I need to be farther away from home” and “on my own” to feel independent and successful.

Patricia AviezerPresidentInside Track To College, Inc.

It’s All About What Works For You

Well working in a state that offers a great scholarship program, this question comes up all the time. If a student could receive a scholarship that pays for 100% of their tuition with a 3.5 GPA and 1280 on the SAT’s, why would they consider other options? So here are the BENEFITS of attending your State College! 1. So close to home that I commute, saving dorm and food costs. 2. I can come home when I want without paying for a plane ticket. 3. Some of my high school friends will be attending the same college and we study well together and I won’t feel so alone in this new setting. 4. I’ll graduate owing very little in loans and can use my savings for graduate school. 5. I’ve graduated in the top 5% from my “very good” high school and know I can compete academically with students from my own state. There are many more reasons, but let’s look at the DRAWBACKS and why you might look into an Out-of-State College. 1. This out-of-state college graduates 80% of entering students within 4 years, my state schools are quoting 6-year graduation rates. 2. The graduation rate of these out-of-state universities are over 85%, my state loses 48% of entering students by sophomore year. 3. I get to exercise my academic interests and explore my options with a population of students with a “different mind set” since they’re not from my state. 4. Since they’re interested in attracting students from all 50 states and countries from around the world and my academics are excellent and scores are top-notch, there are scholarships available to me. 5. “I need to be farther away from home” and “on my own” to feel independent and successful.

Sue Luse

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

Being able to get summer internships close to home.

Ellen [email protected]OwnerEllen Richards Admissions Consulting

You think attending college in the University of California system will save you money? Think again.

For years families in California have opted for colleges within the University of California system. After all, why should in states students spend spend a life’s savings on a few years of college? Now there’s a reason to think outside the state: the Ventura Country Star recently reported a student had the choice to attend Occidental College for $17,000 per year versus the University of Santa Barbara for $25,230. In addition, University of California representatives announced on April 30 that the tuition would increase for the 2009-2010 school year by $662. The undergraduate tuition, combined with room, board, food and incidentals will amount to $25,000. The graduate tuition will increase by 9.3% In the past ten years the UC price tag has doubled. The UC regents defent their position by asserting that the UC system tuition remains lower than most other state universities. They assert that the increase will be offset by financial aid which will be paid for by freezing the salaries of top executives and cutting freshman enrollment by 6%.

Janet RosierPresidentJanet Rosier’s Educational Resources

Wherever You Decide to Attend, Become Involved…

Whether you attend college in your home state or away is less important than what you do when you are there. If you stay fairly close to home, the good news is that it is easy to get home. That can also be the bad news. Students who come home many weekends (some every weekend!) do not transition well into college. They are still tied to friends and events at home and are not getting involved at college. Studies show that students who engage in activities on campus–especially early on– report being happier and are more likely to graduate.

Craig MeisterPresidentTactical College Consulting

In a bad economy, public in-state schools grow in popularity…

Increasingly, public in-state colleges seem to have an edge with applicants because the nasty economy has put downward pressure on what students and parents are willing to shell out for tuition and travel costs. Other benefits of staying close to home include the ease of getting home in an emergency and the likelihood that nearby colleges will have relatively high placement rates with local employers. The latter is attractive to students who want to live and work close to home after graduating. In a difficult economy, the risks associated with going to college far away seem to add up fast.

Jeannie BorinFounder & PresidentCollege Connections

The Truth About In-State Colleges…

It’s hard to ignore the financial benefits of attending a state university. Other advantages include the numerous activities outside class such as clubs and social events as well as increased academic options. Generally in state colleges have a more diverse student body than smaller privates. Some private colleges don’t have the multitude of resources available at larger publics. Large classes can be a drawback for some but many prefer it. Some state budgets have mandated increased tuition, faculty and course cutbacks, which make many private colleges more attractive.

Bill PrudenHead of Upper School, College CounselorRavenscroft School

Where You Learn Impacts What You Learn…

A huge part of a student’s college education is a product of the people with whom one goes to school. Whether it comes from the impact they have on class discussion or is simply a result of the countless informal interactions that take place on the quad, in the dorm, or in the dining room, one’s peers are often the most influential teachers a student will have. Going to school out of state broadens the field from which those “teachers” come, thus expanding the perspectives and experiences to which a student is exposed, thus potentially enriching the educational experience for all.

Kristen TabunDirector of College GuidanceWoodlynde School

College Location Has Potential Pitfalls and Benefits…

In a given year, about half of the students I work with choose to attend college out of state. One drawback of attending college close to home is that some students take advantage of their proximity to go home frequently, especially during their first semester of college. As a result, they may take a longer time acclimating to their new life at college. Students who go further away from home often develop a greater sense of independence sooner. It’s important to reflect on how much independence you’re ready for before you make that final decision.

Bridget HerreraCollege CounselorAmerican School of Campinas Brazil

Studying out-of-state provides few drawbacks beyond distance—something that in this virtual wo…

Living and studying out-of-state is a chance for incredible growth in ways you can’t imagine. While studying in your home state allows you to see family more often and stay connected with your old friends and community, it also impedes the opportunities that living away provides. Your ‘family’ will be the community of learners with whom you live. Together you will learn to become independent and self-sufficient. This is something you will take great pride in, and I can tell you that there is a distinct difference between my students who ‘stay home’ to study and who move away. You may never get this opportunity again, and you will find that all kinds of new possibilities will open up to you when you choose to broaden your horizons.

Jacqueline MurphyDirector of AdmissionsSaint Michael’s College

Grow in confidence and independence by going out of state…

College is seen as preparation for a career, but it is also a transition from adolescence to young adulthood. The greatest benefit of going to school far from home is the growth in confidence from being away from home while in the supportive community of a college or university. Being pushed out of one’s comfort zone, learning how to negotiate through a new location and doing so together with new classmates can build confidence and independence. You won’t earn credits in self-sufficiency but you will come home a more mature, self confident young adult. An example A young woman who suffered separation anxiety was concerned about leaving home but saw the benefit of pushing her limits. Choosing a school four hours from home was a challenge and was not without rocky moments the first year. By junior year, she had the confidence to spend a semester in Vienna Austria, traveling around Europe independently nearly every weekend. Upon graduation she moved from her rural home town to a large eastern city with no problems at all. She attributes her success to that first difficult choice to go to selecting an out of state college.

Kathryn FavaroCollege admissions consultantCalifornia College Prep

Find the best fit. Consider a location where you will be successful…

The best college experience comes from finding your best fit school. There are many factors to consider and location is definitely one of them. Some students feel the need to leave their state and explore a new part of the country while others feel more comfortable staying closer to home. An out of state experience can expose you to new people, geography, and don’t forget – weather. Remember to think about additional criteria like the learning style, size, majors, culture, and research/internship opportunities at each school you are considering. Try to find schools offering all your college “must haves” and stay open minded to location.

Alison AlmasianDirector of AdmissionsSt. Lawrence University

Either way, going to college is an adventure…

College is a great adventure, whether you stay close or venture far from home. College life is, itself, a big change. You’re expected to be much more independent and responsible for your own success. Attending a closer-to-home college could help ease the transition, since you won’t be learning to cope with a completely new environment. (What’s that white stuff falling from the sky—you mean I can’t wear flip-flops all year round?) However, it’s that opportunity to experience a whole new environment that makes going out-of-state so exciting. Since many students will return to their home areas after college to work, going out-of-state can open up so many new horizons–a chance to experience new weather patterns, sports/activities, and even different cultures (yes, there are cultural differences in various states and regions of the country!) Whatever you decide, enjoy the adventure!

John CarpenterFounderAskJohnAboutCollege.com

Sometimes, it’s all about whom you know!…

Staying in-state is a great option, and it means you will have many opportunities to create or strengthen a local network of support both while you’re in school (for internships and volunteer gigs) as well as when you finish school (for jobs, co-ops, graduate school contacts, and so on.) Don’t underestimate the power of being known and knowing others; your contacts during your undergraduate years can become what propels you forward for the rest of your life. Staying close to home also allows you to give back to your own state, using what you learn and whom you meet to make things better; by staying home, you’re fighting the “brain drain” that so many communities worry about by being part of a real solution. You can still spend a year abroad, travel to different cities, explore the world and have your own state as your home base.

Pamela EllisPresidentCompass Education Strategies LLC

Make new friends in a familiar place…

The obvious perks of staying close to home for college are the familiarity you already have with a place and an established support network. On the other hand, these benefits can be drawbacks when students limit their college experience by an over-reliance on familiarity and the same networks. College is a time of amazing development that local, in-state students should still take advantage of by joining clubs, residing on campus, and creating new networks/communities.

Lora LewisEducational ConsultantLora Lewis Consulting

Going Out-Of-State is a Challenge and an Opportunity…

Taking on a new college, city and state all at once can be an opportunity to venture outside your comfort zone and find out who you really are and who you really want to be. Without family and friends nearby, you’ll quickly become more self-reliant and empowered to manage your own life. Homesickness is inevitable, but distance can deepen connections with family and friends and enable you to appreciate these relationships in new ways. While not for everyone, an out-of-state education can be a great way to begin discovering yourself and exploring what the world has to offer.

Sandy FurthCollege AdvisorWorld Student Support

Going to an out of state school can be an enriching experience…

From academics to culture to recreational pursuits, an out of state move provides enriching opportunities for students. It can mean an entirely new environment from weather to friendships to a deeper cultural understanding of our country. These moves may entail a bit of gutsiness, independence and some wanderlust. What might they offer? Academics aside: A landlocked state to Florida: Learning a new sport; fishing or scuba diving. Florida to Colorado: Learning a variety of snow sports. Culturally: A student who left the Midwest to University of New Mexico, she learned as much from the cultural aspect of the Southwest as she did from her academic pursuits.

Shelley KrauseCo-Director of College CounselingRutgers Preparatory School

Look before you leap….to a different state!…

While it seems exciting to meet new people and discover a new part of the country, consider all factors when making that decision. For example, the tuition and fees for out- of-state students may mirror the cost of attendance at a private college, the majority of the students might be from area high schools, the classes might be very large, and post graduate employment opportunities may not be in your area. If cost is a consideration, you will be best served at your own public universities. If cost is not a consideration, consider attending a private college!

Hamilton GreggEducational ConsultantPrivate Practice

Affordable, honors programs and cheap laundry…

Attending school close to home has many benefits. First off, it is cheaper than going out of state or going private. The savvy student could negotiate the offset tuition costs for a down payment on a car. Secondly, bright students might find consolation in honors programs offered at State schools to pique their intellectual curiosity. Many honors programs offer significant challenges and unique programs equivalent to private school programs. Third and finally, being close to home means some home-cooked meals and coin-less laundry machines. Don’t expect mom to clean up after you, but you never know.

Marilyn EmersonPresidentEmerson Educational Consulting

Adventure Awaits You Out-of-State…

Response: Attending college away from home can be exciting. There won’t be many people who know you, so you can start with a clean slate. You will have a new place to explore, new people to meet and an opportunity to experience different cultures. When you graduate you will be much more interesting than those who stayed within their comfort zone. J.S. Lehman, former President of Cornell, said it well, “May you frequently travel beyond the places that are comfortable and familiar, the better to appreciate the miraculous diversity of life.”

Nicole OringerPartnerIvy Educational Services

Managing costs and comfort levels to find the right fit…

The “in-state vs. out-of state” question is usually seen as “affordability vs. adventure.” In the end, it’s less about proximity to home and more about what feels right. If students are ready for the college experience and comfortable enough to get involved academically and engage in campus life, they will love whatever college they choose. Also, comfort levels can change! A local student might love the first couple of semesters of being close, but then want to spread his wings, and an out-of-state student might feel very challenged in the beginning, but make a home out of new location.

Stephanie MeadeOwnerThe Collegiate Edge

Think adventurously! Explore colleges outside your home state…

Most students (probably 70-80%) attend college in their home states, but here are some reasons to join the adventurous group that goes further: If you think of education as more than just classes and books, attending college out of state is an easy way to deepen your learning. Simply living in a different area of the country and having classmates from different places will automatically expand your knowledge and understanding of the world. Secondly, a college far from your home may offer you a merit scholarship, as you will make the student body more geographically diverse, which many colleges want.

Roby BlustDean of Admissions & Enrollment PlanningMarquette University

Look with different eyes!…

Many students don’t consider a college in their hometown or home state because they believe they know it too well – because they pass by it frequently. I would advise you to visit this school like you would an out of state institution. Make an appointment with the admissions office, take a full tour, eat in the cafeteria, stay overnight if available – in other words, look at this school like you would if it was located may miles from home. This will allow you to see it with different eyes, and you might like what you see!

Joanna ShultzDirector of College CounselingThe Ellis School in Pittsburgh, PA

Small steps or big steps toward independence?…

Students attending school in-state may have easier access to their families, which can have advantages and disadvantages! They may also pay less, especially if they choose to attend one of their state’s public institutions. Students choosing to attend school out-of-state, especially when they’re too far from home to have easy access, make a cleaner separation to start their adult lives life since they cannot rely as easily on family. They may also experience a greater diversity of peers, an important part of learning how to be an adult in a global, changing world, and expand their horizons well beyond home.

Kiersten MurphyExecutive Director and FounderMurphy College Consultants LLC

An Opportunity to Try Something New…

I am a firm believer that spending four years away from home can be of great benefit. When in your life can you easily pick up, move to a new state, explore the local culture and then move back home at the end? Your time at college should be about new beginnings and spreading your wings. If you are further from home, you are forced to engage in the college community and can’t run home as a safety net. Students spend too much time worrying about their ability to get home – oftentimes it will take just as long to drive home as it will to fly.

Philip BallingerDirector of Admissions & Assistant VP of EnrollmentUniversity of Washington

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

The missing piece in this question is the specific student it applies to! The benefits and drawbacks will vary according to the student. For example, in general, going farther away from home may help a student become more self reliant in decision and action. On the other hand, some students may struggle mightily when they lose easy access to supportive family and friends back home. Often students will seek and gain employment after graduation in the city or region in which they attended college. Again, this can be a benefit or drawback depending on what the student wishes to do in their work or where they want to live in the longer term. Sometimes staying put in a region or city you love can be a very good practical decision — it simply depends!

Scott WhiteDirector of GuidanceMontclair High School

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

I would state public vs. private as a more important criteria. Private colleges generally give out need based aid (separate from federal or state aid) which can make the college actually cheaper for some students. Also, state budgets are in real trouble, causing public colleges to drop many programs. At Rutgers, where my son goes (and loves), he tells me about the expression “RU Screwed” for the bureaucracy that can be mind numbing. On the other hand, many public colleges have wider arrays of offerings, more diverse student bodies and fewer hipsters…

Dr. FisherCollege CounselorFisher Educational Consultants

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

The benefits of an in-state college are the following: Other than tuition (which can be a big advantage for public colleges) you are probably closer to home and that may be to your liking. Another benefit is that many of your fellow students will find jobs in your home state. That becomes a networking benefit in the future. And, for sure, companies in the state will be recruiting at your school. So, why an out-of-state college? A school’s reputation or particular major may entice you to apply. You will meeting students not only from another state but the geographical background of the students may be varied. That adds to adversity. Of course, a private college in your state may have the same geographical diversity. You will have travel expenses which you might not have by staying in-state.

Ellen [email protected]OwnerEllen Richards Admissions Consulting

You think attending college in the University of California system will save you money? Think again.

For years families in California have opted for colleges within the University of California system. After all, why should in states students spend spend a life’s savings on a few years of college? Now there’s a reason to think outside the state: the Ventura Country Star recently reported a student had the choice to attend Occidental College for $17,000 per year versus the University of Santa Barbara for $25,230. In addition, University of California representatives announced on April 30 that the tuition would increase for the 2009-2010 school year by $662. The undergraduate tuition, combined with room, board, food and incidentals will amount to $25,000. The graduate tuition will increase by 9.3% In the past ten years the UC price tag has doubled. The UC regents defent their position by asserting that the UC system tuition remains lower than most other state universities. They assert that the increase will be offset by financial aid which will be paid for by freezing the salaries of top executives and cutting freshman enrollment by 6%.

Susan MarrsDirector of College CounselingSeven Hills School

Pros and cons of attending college in state and close to home…

Pluses: You’ll probably know more people right away than if you went far away; you can get home fast if there’s an emergency (or a party); and if you end up living and working in the same state, you’ll graduate with lots of contacts. Minuses: You may never stretch yourself socially if you rely primarily on your high school friendships; you may, by default rather than by choice, limit your professional options to employers that recruit locally; you may regret trading familiarity for adventure.

Jolyn BrandOwner & CEOBrand College Consulting

Closer is Safer, but Further is Independence…

The benefits to attending an in-state school are the reduced costs, not only in tuition but in trips home, and storage or moving your things. Another benefit is being close to home, which will be convenient for weekend trips home, if you get sick, or if there is an emergency. The benefits to going out of state are more independence and being able to meet more diverse people, and not just rely on the same kids you went to elementary school with. Some disadvantages with a school far away include a tougher transition to college life, being homesick, being lonely while you adjust and make new friends.

Maureen LawlerCollege CounselorBishop Kelley High

Staying close to home isn’t so bad!…

There are several benefits to attending an in state institution. Those benefits include being close to home, reduced transportation costs since sharing rides is possible. You can go home for the holidays, you can take your laundry home, and you can enjoy mom’s good home cooking. You will have friends around so you will be in a comfortable surrounding. With benefits there are drawbacks. An in state institution may not provide much diversity since most are from your state. It may also be a continuation of high school because you are surrounded by your friends. Always weigh your options.

Donnamarie HehnDirector of College GuidanceCanterbury School of Florida

Is the best school for you in your backyard?…

Too often, students define the college experience as an escape from the familiar and overlook the potentially best school for them because it is located in their home state. There is merit in moving away from home: independence, different cultural experiences, new friends, full immersion in college life. However, all of these can be achieved while still living in-state: live on campus, join campus activities, attend cultural events on campus. No matter where you attend college, you will need to push yourself beyond your comfort zone and be open to new experiences to maximize your university experience.

Marie BullockIndependent CounselorWashington Lee High School

To close can be a real disadvantage to your college experience…

Going to a state school can have some professional advantages. While at a state school you will be able to do volunteer work and internships with locals who can help you build contacts for the future. You will be able to make connections across your state in the friends that you meet and in the campus organizations that you connect with. These contacts can offer opportunities for your future career choice. Some state schools are located far away from your hometown, but most likely not as far away as compared to going out-of-state. You will have to make sure that your state school (or any school you chose) is not a “commuter campus”. You want to find out if the campus is one that has a full range of choices for weekend activities and cultural offerings. These are things that will help you grow and develop into the independent adult you want to become.

Joan CaseyPresidentEducational Advocates College Consulting Corp.

Leaving Home: Sunshine and reputation versus networking and familiarity…

An out-of-state option may offer benefits such as a stronger academic reputation, a location with year-round moderate temperatures, access to a vibrant college town or outdoor activity such as skiing. Alternatively, as an out-of-state student, one needs to evaluate how it will feel to be one of the few non-natives on campus. Will a Red Sox fan be happy in Yankee territory? Students traveling far from home may find few on campus who share their religion or culture. If the student plans to return home, he may lose career-networking opportunities with home state alumni. Either option can be the right choice depending on the student’s goals and priorities.

Rebecca JosephExecutive Director & Foundergetmetocollege.org

Should I stay or should I go now…If I go……

Geographic, financial, and familial boundaries often determine where students attend college. In-state costs of public universities are often ½ to ¾ of out-of-state public or private colleges. However, many public universities have hiked costs in this economy, so some out-of-state and private colleges are powerful choices. Did you know many states participate in consortiums of colleges that reduce out-of-state costs (e.g. the Western Undergraduate Exchange)? Yet choosing a college should center on fit–academic, social, size, spirit, extracurricular. And sometimes out-of-state private and public colleges offer merit scholarships that make them financially possible. So discuss these possibilities early and often.

Joyce Vining MorganFounder and college counselorEducational Transitions

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

For some careers, in-state colleges give its students better connections with the people with whom they will work in that state. Think politicians – they have better cred with an education in their state. And there’s the personal question – out-of-state is 49 options: you could be very far from home. Studying far away in a different region of the country gives you a chance to see the culture of that region: a New England Yankee in Alabama or the Big Easy, a Kansan in Connecticut. You get the idea! It’s a whole second education, for the price of the first.

Joyce Vining MorganFounder and college counselorEducational Transitions

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

For some careers, in-state colleges give its students better connections with the people with whom they will work in that state. Think politicians – they have better cred with an education in their state. And there’s the personal question – out-of-state is 49 options: you could be very far from home. Studying far away in a different region of the country gives you a chance to see the culture of that region: a New England Yankee in Alabama or the Big Easy, a Kansan in Connecticut. You get the idea! It’s a whole second education, for the price of the first.

Tony BankstonDean of AdmissionsIllinois Wesleyan University

Close to Home or Far Away, Fit Is Still the Most Important

There are certainly benefits and drawbacks when it comes to your colleges distance from home. One immediate benefit is the opportunity to experience a different part of the country or the world. While “different” doesn’t always equate to “better,” college is one of the few opportunities in your life where you can suddenly just head off to another location for four years. It can also allow you to establish your contacts in another community or location. If you are from the Midwest but dream of living and working in New York, attending a college in the New York area will allow you to start building friendships and professional contacts. Keep in mind that even if you choose to attend a college closer to home, you can still accomplish these things through study abroad and travel internships, but it would be for a limited time versus a full four year experience. The greatest drawback to going further from home is being away from family and friends. Students need to realize that you just won’t be able to come home whenever you want to. Technology like cell phones and Skype have helped to keep students in touch with those back home, but you have to be comfortable with not being able to be there in person for certain things. I also recommend that prospective students make a visit by themselves to their distant college. How did you like the drive or dealing with the airport? If you have a bad reaction with the experience, it may be an aggravation that grows during your time at that particular college. In the end, you are most likely to enjoy your college experience and be successful if you have chosen a college that best fits your overall educational needs. Whether it’s in your backyard or halfway around the world, the fit is still very important. So don’t be to hasty in ruling out a college just because it’s too close or too far. If it’s the right college, investigate a little further to see how you might be able to deal with your particular drawbacks to the distance from home, either too near or too far.

Tony BankstonDean of AdmissionsIllinois Wesleyan University

Close to Home or Far Away, Fit Is Still the Most Important

There are certainly benefits and drawbacks when it comes to your colleges distance from home. One immediate benefit is the opportunity to experience a different part of the country or the world. While “different” doesn’t always equate to “better,” college is one of the few opportunities in your life where you can suddenly just head off to another location for four years. It can also allow you to establish your contacts in another community or location. If you are from the Midwest but dream of living and working in New York, attending a college in the New York area will allow you to start building friendships and professional contacts. Keep in mind that even if you choose to attend a college closer to home, you can still accomplish these things through study abroad and travel internships, but it would be for a limited time versus a full four year experience. The greatest drawback to going further from home is being away from family and friends. Students need to realize that you just won’t be able to come home whenever you want to. Technology like cell phones and Skype have helped to keep students in touch with those back home, but you have to be comfortable with not being able to be there in person for certain things. I also recommend that prospective students make a visit by themselves to their distant college. How did you like the drive or dealing with the airport? If you have a bad reaction with the experience, it may be an aggravation that grows during your time at that particular college. In the end, you are most likely to enjoy your college experience and be successful if you have chosen a college that best fits your overall educational needs. Whether it’s in your backyard or halfway around the world, the fit is still very important. So don’t be to hasty in ruling out a college just because it’s too close or too far. If it’s the right college, investigate a little further to see how you might be able to deal with your particular drawbacks to the distance from home, either too near or too far.

Barbara Jones

In-state vs.out-of-state benefits and drawbacks.

In state benefits include those scholarships that are exclusive to in state students. There tends to be a waiting line for out of state schools for even students with excellent credentials. Many students find it easier to be admitted to in-state schools for their undergraduate work and to the out of state schools for graduate work.

Tony BankstonDean of AdmissionsIllinois Wesleyan University

Close to Home or Far Away, Fit Is Still the Most Important

There are certainly benefits and drawbacks when it comes to your colleges distance from home. One immediate benefit is the opportunity to experience a different part of the country or the world. While “different” doesn’t always equate to “better,” college is one of the few opportunities in your life where you can suddenly just head off to another location for four years. It can also allow you to establish your contacts in another community or location. If you are from the Midwest but dream of living and working in New York, attending a college in the New York area will allow you to start building friendships and professional contacts. Keep in mind that even if you choose to attend a college closer to home, you can still accomplish these things through study abroad and travel internships, but it would be for a limited time versus a full four year experience. The greatest drawback to going further from home is being away from family and friends. Students need to realize that you just won’t be able to come home whenever you want to. Technology like cell phones and Skype have helped to keep students in touch with those back home, but you have to be comfortable with not being able to be there in person for certain things. I also recommend that prospective students make a visit by themselves to their distant college. How did you like the drive or dealing with the airport? If you have a bad reaction with the experience, it may be an aggravation that grows during your time at that particular college. In the end, you are most likely to enjoy your college experience and be successful if you have chosen a college that best fits your overall educational needs. Whether it’s in your backyard or halfway around the world, the fit is still very important. So don’t be to hasty in ruling out a college just because it’s too close or too far. If it’s the right college, investigate a little further to see how you might be able to deal with your particular drawbacks to the distance from home, either too near or too far.

Tony BankstonDean of AdmissionsIllinois Wesleyan University

Close to Home or Far Away, Fit Is Still the Most Important

There are certainly benefits and drawbacks when it comes to your colleges distance from home. One immediate benefit is the opportunity to experience a different part of the country or the world. While “different” doesn’t always equate to “better,” college is one of the few opportunities in your life where you can suddenly just head off to another location for four years. It can also allow you to establish your contacts in another community or location. If you are from the Midwest but dream of living and working in New York, attending a college in the New York area will allow you to start building friendships and professional contacts. Keep in mind that even if you choose to attend a college closer to home, you can still accomplish these things through study abroad and travel internships, but it would be for a limited time versus a full four year experience. The greatest drawback to going further from home is being away from family and friends. Students need to realize that you just won’t be able to come home whenever you want to. Technology like cell phones and Skype have helped to keep students in touch with those back home, but you have to be comfortable with not being able to be there in person for certain things. I also recommend that prospective students make a visit by themselves to their distant college. How did you like the drive or dealing with the airport? If you have a bad reaction with the experience, it may be an aggravation that grows during your time at that particular college. In the end, you are most likely to enjoy your college experience and be successful if you have chosen a college that best fits your overall educational needs. Whether it’s in your backyard or halfway around the world, the fit is still very important. So don’t be to hasty in ruling out a college just because it’s too close or too far. If it’s the right college, investigate a little further to see how you might be able to deal with your particular drawbacks to the distance from home, either too near or too far.

Tony BankstonDean of AdmissionsIllinois Wesleyan University

Close to Home or Far Away, Fit Is Still the Most Important

There are certainly benefits and drawbacks when it comes to your colleges distance from home. One immediate benefit is the opportunity to experience a different part of the country or the world. While “different” doesn’t always equate to “better,” college is one of the few opportunities in your life where you can suddenly just head off to another location for four years. It can also allow you to establish your contacts in another community or location. If you are from the Midwest but dream of living and working in New York, attending a college in the New York area will allow you to start building friendships and professional contacts. Keep in mind that even if you choose to attend a college closer to home, you can still accomplish these things through study abroad and travel internships, but it would be for a limited time versus a full four year experience. The greatest drawback to going further from home is being away from family and friends. Students need to realize that you just won’t be able to come home whenever you want to. Technology like cell phones and Skype have helped to keep students in touch with those back home, but you have to be comfortable with not being able to be there in person for certain things. I also recommend that prospective students make a visit by themselves to their distant college. How did you like the drive or dealing with the airport? If you have a bad reaction with the experience, it may be an aggravation that grows during your time at that particular college. In the end, you are most likely to enjoy your college experience and be successful if you have chosen a college that best fits your overall educational needs. Whether it’s in your backyard or halfway around the world, the fit is still very important. So don’t be to hasty in ruling out a college just because it’s too close or too far. If it’s the right college, investigate a little further to see how you might be able to deal with your particular drawbacks to the distance from home, either too near or too far.

Katherine PriceSenior AssociateGreat College Advice

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

One of the biggest factors students consider when looking at colleges is how far they will be from home. For some students, it is really important to be within driving distance of home, but for others, being a good plane ride away may be the best option. Consider what you want to get out of your college experience and learn about yourself over the next four years. Is that opportunity available down the street from your house or will you need to venture a little further out into the world? 1. Is it time for a change? Sure you may feel homesick if you decide to go to a school that is far from home, but most students say that homesickness eventually goes away. Nothing can replace waking up with your cat or dog, a home-cooked meal from mom, or hanging out with all of your high school friends, but being away at school gives you the chance to create new memories and become more independent. I always tell my students that home is never the same after high school ends. Your friends may move away and you certainly will not have the same routine. Being away from home gives you the chance to really learn about yourself, without being influenced by the comforts that have always been around you. It can be a tough journey, but worth it in the end. Keep in mind that this decision is not permanent. You can always go back after graduation! 2. Increasing admissibility? One of the downsides of being a non-resident at a state school is that you will have to pay out-of-state tuition. Well, in this economy, that makes out-of-state students very desireable. Last year, Boston.com reported that UMass Amerhst plans to “aggressively recruit” out-of-state students. They also plan on increasing scholarship opportunities and other financial incentives. Inside Higher Ed also reported that similar ideas are being tossed around at UC Berkeley, UCSD, Rutgers University and University of Colorado. While this may be a new trend for some state schools, private schools have been seeking students outside of their normal geographic regions for years. This “geographic diversity” can be a bonus in the admissions process. 3. Is it really more expensive? As I mentioned above, out-of-state tuition at public school can be pricey, but as with anything in the college admission process, it is important to do your homework. We have previously reported on the importance of comparison shopping when it comes to paying tuition at state schools. In some instances it can actually be cheaper than paying tuition in your home state! Also, some private colleges do take into consideration your distance from home when determining financial aid packages. As a result, financial aid packages can include travel funds. Travel scholarships may also be available through the admissions office if you are in need of financial assistance in order to visit a school that is far from home. 4. Finding the right fit. Reality is that the schools in your state may not offer what you are looking for. They may not have the right major or access to career resources you feel that you need. In these circumstances, an out-of-state school may provide the right fit for the college experience you are envisioning. (Look at our website for more information on this: http://greatcollegeadvice.com/college-shopping-tips-when-out-of-state-is-cheaper-than-in-state-tuition/) 5. Experiencing a new part of the country. Fact of the matter is that it is a big world out there. One of the greatest things about the United States is that there is so much to see and experience. You have the opportunity to live in a completely different environment and you don’t even have to leave the country! So jump in with both feet and really begin to think about how going way to college can change your life! Katherine Price www.greatcollegeadvice.com

Francine SchwartzFounder/ PresidentPathfinder Counseling LLC

College – Choices Near and Far

Going to school in state generally means you will be living closer to home. It will be easier to come home for weekends and holidays to see your family and friends who may also be close to home. There is a sense of familiarity being in your home state which will help ease the transition to college. If you plan to continue to live in your state after college obtaining certain certifications such as for teaching may be less complicated. Drawbacks include possibly not having as much diversity as you would venturing farther from home. Also it may be harder to become independent if you have the comfort of home to fall back on.

Francine SchwartzFounder/ PresidentPathfinder Counseling LLC

College – Choices Near and Far

Going to school in state generally means you will be living closer to home. It will be easier to come home for weekends and holidays to see your family and friends who may also be close to home. There is a sense of familiarity being in your home state which will help ease the transition to college. If you plan to continue to live in your state after college obtaining certain certifications such as for teaching may be less complicated. Drawbacks include possibly not having as much diversity as you would venturing farther from home. Also it may be harder to become independent if you have the comfort of home to fall back on. Francine Schwartz, M.A., LPC, NCC Founder and President Pathfinder Counseling LLC

Luci Paz

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

I strongly suggest going to school out of state. It is agreat opportunity to grow in self-awareness, becomming an individual not an extension of your family. Also it helps you become more responsible making decisions for yourself. I would recommend staying in the dorms not gettong an apartment as a freshma. You don’t need to concern yourself with utility bills and groceries as you start your college cereer.

MacKenzie LeFort

In State VS. Out of State

Besides Tuition there really isn’t anything different. You are the same student. There is no benefits or disadvantages. The only maybe possible benefit is that you may be able to claim more on your taxes. However that is dependent on your/parent financial situation. If you have any other questions feel free to email [email protected]

Tam Warner MintonConsultantCollege Adventures

In state or out of state

Every student is different. Some will thrive away from home and on their own, some need to stay a little closer to home. Whether you go near or far you need to make the commitment to stay on campus on weekends and immerse yourself in your new life. I don’t really think there are benefits and drawbacks generally, only specifically. For example, when my daughter started looking at colleges she wanted to stay in town, but we felt that she would grow more as a person if she went away. She attended college in a distant state, did two study abroads, and pursued graduate studies in a different city. Now she is back home and working on her career. She benefited from going away, seeing new places, experiencing different cultures, and living elsewhere. Not all students should go out of state, but I think many should.

Erin AveryCertified Educational PlannerAvery Educational Resources, LLC

Public v. Private? By and Large

I interpret this question as a debate between public versus private education, because clearly, a student from NJ can attend UMD, be out of state but still be attending a public institution. Public institutions by and large (emphasis on the large) have larger student populations (some exceptions include SUNY Geneseo and The College of William and Mary). Larger can seem enticing to high school students who assume (often inaccurately) that college has to be larger than their high school or it is not college. The larger the student population, the larger the number of classes taught not by the scholarly professors, but their teaching assistants. Students choose public universities for the often large array of majors available in contrast to smaller private colleges. Finally, many of my students desire anonymity: they like the 500 student lecture format. However, another large percentage of my clients have enjoyed the close relationships they have developed with their high school teachers and desire that quality of relationship in college. Private colleges frequently report higher student engagement in student learning often resulting in higher percentages of graduates being accepted to graduate school after graduatation.

Archana Sudame

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

In State: less cost of travel, close proximity to family if needed, and more chances that your high school friends will be there with you. Drawbacks: most states have financial problems and this is affecting the quality of student life at these in-state places: lower financial aid package, availability of desirable majors or classes, and facilities.

Helen Cella

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

Student body, school location

Nicholas Umphrey

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

One clear benefit is that the out of state school may offer a program that none of your in-state schools do. For years, Maine has not had a Pharmacy program. So students would go to University of Connecticut or University of Rhode Island. There is also the life experience of being away from home which some kids are ready for while others are not. A drawback is that students often pay twice for one major that they would have in their own state. And homesickness.

Melissa GolliharCounselor

Benefits and drawbacks of attending an in state school.

The benefits of attending an in state school aside from tuition are the fact that your family is close in case of any emergencies. In state, you are usually familiar with the community and cultural norms. In state requirements for student enrollment are usually less restrictive than out of state requirements. The drawbacks are that the student may be missing out on a growing experience by living in a different state. The student may not experience true independence if parents live in close proximity to the university.

James LundgrenPartnerCollege Planning Solutions

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

I always like for my students and parents to accept the strong possibility that the student may live near the college they attend for a couple of years after graduation. If we used my Career to Major to College philosophy; the college has been successful in not only teaching the student what they needed to learn, but assisted them into internships leading to their being offered a position prior to graduating. It will be easier for them to successfully assimilate back home with both their degree and a little practical “real world” experience.

Benjamin CaldarelliPartnerPrinceton College Consulting, LLC

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

Quite simply going further away from home can be both a benefit or a drawback. Being further away will make it harder to travel home which can be a positive, students will be forced to experience life at college fully and hopefully grow and mature. It can be a drawback however if a student wishes to visit home more often, or has trouble adjusting. Experiencing a lesser known place and meeting new people is almost always a good thing. However, going to college in state, even if it is not that far away in distance, will be quite a new place and experience. Lastly, some states just have better quality schools than others.

Pamela Hampton-GarlandOwnerScholar Bound

Instate vs. Out of state Tuition Not Factored

Let’s look at a few options: IN OUT Friends Making New Connections Family Closer Growing Up with more independence Ability to visit local hot spots Finding new spots for entertainment Built in Personal Care Provider Finding a new reliable source for (Hair, Nails, Barber, Tailor, etc.)

Pamela Hampton-GarlandOwnerScholar Bound

Instate vs. Out of state Tuition Not Factored

Let’s look at a few options: IN OUT Friends Making New Connections Family Closer Growing Up with more independence Ability to visit local hot spots Finding new spots for entertainment Built in Personal Care Provider Finding a new reliable source for (Hair, Nails, Barber, Tailor, etc.) personal care needs limited travel cost to visit home may not be able to visit most holidays and breaks moving in may be less taxing transporting or storing goods at the end and beginning easier to get a truck for a 5 hr. of semesters may prove to be a hassle than a 10 hr. jaunt There are other concerns that may be important but these are a few of the generalized ones; don’t forget about faith and worship which may also need consideration.

Corey FischerPresidentCollegeClarity

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

This is a tough question to answer because generalizing is always dangerous, but the response will be pretty long if I give all the scenarios. When you go out-of state you expose yourself to a wider range of thoughts and cultures. The further you go and the more you get out of your comfort zone the more you will stretch yourself as an individual and learn and grow. Most students stay within 300 miles of their home. If you are willing to look at the outer reaches of this or beyond you may be more attractive to a college (geographic diversity) and they may be a little more lenient in the admission process. You need to know yourself. Some students love the idea of doing something different and going someplace where they don’t know anyone. Other students find those ideas frightening. If you need to get home frequently, it would be wise to stay within a reasonable proximity.

王文君 June ScortinoPresidentIVY Counselors Network

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

close to home is always better to keep your part time jobs for example, but will not serve the purpose of keeping old friends.

王文君 June ScortinoPresidentIVY Counselors Network

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

close to home is always better to keep your part time jobs but will not serve the purpose of keeping old friends.

Chuck SlatePresidentCollege Advisors,LLC

TUITION ASIDE…..

In-State -vs-Out of State Tuition aside, I try to get the parents to think outside the box–outside the box of the state they live in. Afterall, your automobile doesn’t know what state it’s in, why should you care either?? Sit down with the whole family and do this little exercise. You’ll need a map/atlas of the United States and a math compass. (1) Take a math compass, and stick the point into your city on the map of the United States. Now draw a concentric circle. How big of circle? That’s where the family discussion begins. How many miles away is Mom and Dad comfortable with? How far away is Kelly or Kyle really willing to live? It really has nothing to do with states. If your circle is a 6 hour driving circle from your home it will most likely include schools from several states. This exercise is subject to change. I once had a student insist she wanted to go to an exclusive School of the Arts which was over 11 hours from home. Half way to the visit she made Mom and Dad turn around and go home. The most equitable and rational approach a family can take is to consider ALL APPROPRIATE SCHOOLS within a certain RADIUS.

Trevor CreedenDirector of College and Career CounselingDelaware County Christian School

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

A big benefit that you sometimes can benefit from state scholarship and grant opportunites like the South Carolina Palmetto Fellows, Life and Hope Scholarships and Georgia’s Hope Scholarship. So whatever state you live in make sure you do your research to see if your state offers any scholarship or grant opportunities. Another benefit is distance from home but this may depend on where you live. More than likely you are going to live closer to in-state institutions than out-of-state. Some students would like to just be closer to home so they can come home on weekends and still attend their sibling’s sporting events and or be near their parents. Another benefit is that depending on your major, if you attend an in-state school, you may be able to get a job in-state after graduation and they will pay back your loan’s for you. This is something I know happens for nurses and teachers so it’s worth looking into. One drawback I can think of by going to an in-state school vs. and out-of-state school is that you may be compromising going to a college that fits you better and has a better fit for the major you want just to be closer to home.

. .

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

A couple of things here, although the question is very subjective and driven by the individual: 1. Close proximity to family At one point or another during your college career, you are likely going to feel somewhat homesick and although I don’t recommend doing this all the time, you are going to want to go home and see your family and friends. Going to college in state will enable you to do so a few times per term without having to break the bank in terms of travel costs and time. 2. State pride One of the big things we are focused on here in Ohio is keeping our talented students in the state of Ohio. As such, if you are passionate about the state you live in, go to college in that state! It’s great to provide your talents to the state you are proud of while you are in college and beyond. 3. Scholarships There are quite a few scholarships out there that are for in state students. For instance, the Ohio Here To Stay scholarship (which my company sponsors) is for current high school juniors who attend an Ohio high school and commit to attending a college in the state of Ohio upon graduating. To learn more about this particular scholarship competition, visit: http://www.chapmancac.com/ohioheretostay.html

Joseph RomanoCollege CounselorBellarmine College Preparatory

Value Added out-of-state

Students gain new outlooks, become exposed to cultures different from their own, and gain perspective by attending college outside of their own state

Kat Kadian-BaumeyerVocational Guidance Counselor

In-State or Out-of-State … How to decide?

Besides the tuition break, a student must decide on a few things: Do I like being away from family and friends during breaks and holidays? Do I mind traveling long distances to see friends and family? Do I think I can handle working and living in a strange place? How much will an airline ticket cost during the December break? Can I afford it? Can my family afford it? Do I make friends easily? Will I miss home? Do I enjoy freedom and independence? Will I abuse the freedom andindependence? Am I responsible and mature enough to handle being on my own? What have I done recently to demonstrate this? Take a flight alone? Sleep in a hotel room alone? Take a long drive alone? Can I balance a checkbook? Can I live within a budget? Once you answer these simple questions, you will be able to determine for yourself … the benefits and drawbakcs of each.

Mark GiesmannCounselorCherry Creek High School

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

Pay close attention to the in-state and out-of-state percentages. Experiencing a new surrounding is an exciting part of the college process but there is no sense in travelling across the country to be surrounded by a bunch of students all from the same area. Make sure the school you choose is attracting students from all over if diversity is important to you.

Donovan BlakeLead ConsultantGriffin Blake Educational Consulting

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

If you want to be near your family and old friends, a school in-state is a great option. This could also work well for the student who wants the best of both worlds. You could be independent at the college and a short drive to get back home. An out-of-state school is best for students who are really ready to be independent. This option can be viewed as an adventure. You will get to explore a new city, see new places, and meet new friends. You may not be able to go home as often as other students, but it can sharpen your independent living skills.

Karen O’Neill, MSEdCounselorKSO College Counselling

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

The first year of college is all about transitions. New food. A roommate who, on the first day of school is likely to be a perfect stranger. Professors who have different expectations of you than that from your high school teachers. In high school, you were in school from 9 to 3. In college, your class time is much less. You have a lot of unscheduled time to manage. You have to make more decisions for yourself than ever before. So- take the time to make an honest appraisal of your current lifestyle. Do you need a lot of down time? How much time do you spend with your family? If you go to school in state, it is relatively easy for you to get home for a quick and inexpensive break in you are craving your own bed, a home cooked meal, and time with siblings and parents. In state schools, or schools with a lot of instate students may (and I repeat MAY) have a lot of students that go home on weekends frequently. Which means some campuses may be very quiet on the weekends. When you visit schools, be sure to find out if this is the case and then determine how you feel about that. Visit the school during the week and then again, on a weekend. Out of state schools – even though all colleges are actively recruiting a more diverse student population, going to school out of state offers you the opportunity to explore a new region and its micro-culture. Internships and community service programs also deepen your experience, help you establish career networks and contacts, and help you understand if you want to re-locate to that region after you graduate! One last note – in this economy, state (public) schools often have higher enrollment. Best to check on how easy it is to get into the courses you want. Find out about this.

adam baerWriter and Editor for Top National Magazines, Websites, and Newspapers

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

Proximity to your home is an advantage for some, a disadvantage to others, obviously. Getting out of your state if you can afford it, and you don’t need to stay close for health or personal reasons, often helps you broaden your horizons. But this is not always the case.

Timothy LLaw ClerkDuke University School of Law

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

One of the biggest benefits of going to school out-of-state is broadening your global network. If you grew up in a smaller city and have had the same friends since 2nd grade, chances are your local college will be packed with the same friends. By going out of state, you broaden your network and have the opportunity to expose yourself to friends, jobs and opportunities you might not have had otherwise. That being said, also consider where you want to work after graduation. If you’re looking at a competitive market that likes its locals, make sure you’re one of them.

Jessica BrondoFounder and CEOThe Edge in College Prep

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

– Going to school far away certainly incurs many more expenses. Travel home is costlier in terms of time and money, and time zone differences might make communicating harder too. However, a school may well be worth the distance, and if so, going far shouldn’t deter from going to the school you love. Distance can also be a good thing for students who want to get away from their house and try something completely new. – Being close to home is cheaper in terms of visiting home. However, students may be at risk of surprise parents visits if they are too close (and if their parents are like that), but also they are less likely to meet new/different people, as most students tend to go to schools that are relatively close to their homes. Far away schools expose you to a more diverse friend group (there really is a difference between East and West coast, and the north and the South!) and can let you make new social connections. Going to your state school with all your friends means it’s easy to not make any new ones and doesn’t force you to develop and put yourself out there.

Joseph FrickCollege Guidance Counselor

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

It depends on what state you live in and the quality of the schools you have access to, first and foremost. If your state doesn’t have high quality institutions or what you want to study, obviously it makes sense to see what else is out there. Other than that, there are two main benefits to studying out of state: geographical proximity to what interests you in terms of career and generally challenging yourself/expanding your horizons. In terms of geographical proximity, some schools have better access to certain professors, internship opportunities, and so forth due to their location (e.g., schools in Virginia, Maryland, and Washington, DC in terms of political science, economics, and international affairs or schools in the New York City region in terms of the arts and media). In challenging yourself/expanding your horizons, going away for school represents the best chance–possibly in your life!–to live in a different place, meet different people, and experience new things. Don’t be afraid to move outside of your comfort zone! You’ll appreciate it in the end.

Ken PhamTutor/StudentColumbia Basin College

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

In-State schools are very cheap for in-state students. Out of state schools would charge almost double the tuition or more. Most prestigious liberal art colleges and Ivy Leagues don’t do that tho. In-State schools would be a save choice if you’re in a community college of that state because you can transfer a lot of credits. Most out-of state schools accept around 64 credits maximum.

Mary Hilles

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

Many states offer incentives to local students if they attend a school in their home state. Florida, for instance, offers the Florida Bright Futures Scholarship if students attend college in the state. Many local scholarships are also awarded to students if they choose a college in their home state. Check scholarship criteria before applying and make sure you can use the funds outside of your home state.

Mary Hilles

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

Many states offer incentives to local students if they attend a school in their home state. Florida, for instance, offers the Florida Bright Futures Scholarship if students attend college in the state. Many local scholarships are also awarded to students if they choose a college in their home state. Check scholarship criteria before applying and make sure you can use the funds outside of your home state.

Todd WeaverSenior AdvisorStrategies for College, Inc.

Alumni Network

Money aside, a benefit of attending school in-state vs. out-of-state could be that your alumni network may be more populous and thus, will provide more opportunity for connections for jobs, careers, life, happiness, etc. if the student wanted to settle in the same location after graduation.

Nancy MilneOwnerMilne Collegiate Consulting

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

Benefits to attending school in-state would include: may be closer to home, logistically easier to get home, not as expensive to get home. You become the local expert for the out-of-staters. You may feel more comfortable with the diversity factor being what you’ve grown up with. Benefits to attending school out-of-state: exposure to a different place. Opportunity to “start fresh” without high school classmates in tow. Chance to experience some cultural diversity. Drawbacks to attending school in-state: you may just feel like college is a very close extension of high school. Proximity to home may make it too easy to leave campus too often. Drawbacks to attending school out-of-state: limited visits back home due to distance, extra effort required to acclimate to new surroundings.

Tony TsoHeadmasterTerasmanna Oikademy

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

First of all, in-state tuition advantage only applies to state-tax-funded schools, not private schools. Furthermore, given higher educational institutions’ obsession with diversity both in race and demographics, in some cases out-of-state schools may be more eager to give scholarships that can off-set tuition. Given price is a function of supply and demand, out-of-state tuition in Montana may be cheaper than in-state tuition in Virginia. So you should never look at the published tuition prices just like you never bother with MSR price on anything you buy. It doesn’t matter because nobody ever pays retail. It’s what you must pay out of pocket after financial aide that matters. Net-out-of-pocket cost aside, in-state vs. out-of-state is a meaningless distinction. A more meaningful distinction is how far is the school from home. This has to do with the cost/effort of going home for holidays, birthdays, etc.(or laundry, mom’s cooking or girl friend) and opportunity to grow into maturity and acquire independence. For many young people, getting far enough from mom and dad is necessary to come into their own but connectivity via cell phone and internet has somewhat negated the benefit of distance. Some kids want to be as far away as possible, yet they depend on their parents for all of their living costs. The independence they perceive is purely fictional. For those raised to be on their own in all aspects of life, a local community college within commute distance is no hindrance. Parents and the student should discuss the implications of distance/travel for personal growth/responsibility before making a decision.

Tanjanesia Willoughby

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

In some states, i.e. Pennsylvania, there is state aid available to in-state residents. Once, students decide to go out of state, if grant eligible, they can lose the additional aid. Some states, for instance Louisiana, have in state scholarships (i.e.TOPS) available to its high school residents that have maintained a certain grade point average and/or ACT/SAT score. State financial aid office provide financial assistance as an incentive to remain in state to support state and private institutions of higher education within that state. It is encouraged to explore higher education institutions within his/her state that may offer the majors that students have an interest in, it’s academic preparedness in that major, retention and graduation rates, and career placement in a specific field. Sometimes, students may find a gem in their own backyard.

Willard DixDirector of ProgrammingChicago Scholars

You’re In the Money (or Not)

Tuition has nothing to do with it, unless you’re considering attending a state school in someone else’s state. Those schools charge outsiders extra because they aren’t paying state taxes (primarily), so that’s why you pay a premium. However, private colleges and universities charge everyone the same whether they’re from Minneapolis or Mars (not factoring in financial aid). That being said, consider that college is four years to explore academic, environmental, and many other factors that are less easy to explore once you need to find a job. Going out of state challenges you to live independently, try a snowy or rural or hot or urban environment that you’re not used to, find out about regional habits and accents (yes, they still exist!), and so on. Staying nearby can be important if you need to be near family or if you simply want to stay in your comfort zone, but college is always a new environment, so I say, live it up and embrace the challenges!

Woodrow DunnAcademic CounselorFreedom High School

Title your answer…Out of State In State

Are you an independent person? Are you flexible? Have you been exposed to different regions of the country and/or cultures? Do you have an extremely close -knit family? Are you in a close relationship? Do you respond well under pressure? These are all important considerations, if you decide to leave home and study in another state or region of the country.

Lynda McGeeCollege CounselorDowntown Magnets High School

Learning Is Not Confined To The Classroom

As someone who started as a commuter at a local state college, and then transferred 2400 miles away, I feel especially qualified for this question. The benefits of “going away” to college is that it forces you out of your comfort zone. You will need to find friends, perhaps adjust to weather changes, and learn to live without your parents right there to fix things for you. You will also experience a taste of freedom that isn’t possible when you attend college close to home. You will leave college with friends from all over, whereas at a local school, most of your contacts will be residents of your state. The drawbacks are that going home will be limited, and you will probably be spending Thanksgiving with a new friend’s family if winter break is just 3 weeks away. But this is how you make deep friendships, and the pluses far outweigh the minuses.

Sandy AustinProfessional School CounselorGreen Mountain High School

In-State versus Out-of-State Schools: That is the Question

Several factors need to be taken into consideration regarding in-state versus out-of-state institutions. Out-of-State Benefits — Since you are away from home, you are forced to grow up quicker. — You can find out who you really are without the influences of home squeezing you into a certain mold. — You can see other cultures and meet others and expand your experience. Out-of-State Drawbacks — You can’t go home for the smaller one or two-day holidays or weekends. — The financial cost of going home – if you have to fly, take the train, etc. – can be prohibitive. — If you want your career to end up in your home state, this may put you at a disadvantage. — You may not be prepared for the inclement weather in the other state. In-State Benefits — Sometimes you are more familiar with the schools so you’ll be able to make a more informed college decision. — You may be able to stay at home while going to college to save money – if you prefer this. — You may be able to go home for weekends and holidays. — Your mom may be able to do your wash on the weekends. — After graduation, if you want to work in your home state this will probably be of help. In-State Drawbacks — Your options for careers more suited for other areas of the country (for example, if you want to go into marine biology and your home is in Oklahoma, you need to go to a college in close proximity to the ocean, etc.) will be limited if you stay in state. — If you want your career to be in another area of the country, this may hinder you.

Sandy Austin

In-State vs. Out-of-State – That is the Question

Several factors need to be taken into consideration regarding in-state versus out-of-state institutions. Out-of-State Benefits — Since you are away from home, you are forced to grow up quicker. — You can find out who you really are without the influences of home squeezing you into a certain mold. — You can see other cultures and meet others and expand your experience. Out-of-State Drawbacks — You can’t go home for the smaller one or two-day holidays or weekends. — The financial cost of going home – if you have to fly, take the train, etc. – can be prohibitive. — If you want your career to end up in your home state, this may put you at a disadvantage. — You may not be prepared for the inclement weather in the other state. In-State Benefits — Sometimes you are more familiar with the schools so you’ll be able to make a more informed college decision. — You may be able to stay at home while going to college to save money – if you prefer this. — You may be able to go home for weekends and holidays. — Your parent may be volunteer to do your wash on the weekends. — After graduation, if you want to work in your home state this will probably be of help. In-State Drawbacks — Your options for careers more suited for other areas of the country (for example, if you want to go into marine biology and your home is in Oklahoma, you need to go to a college in close proximity to the ocean, etc.) will be limited if you stay in state. — If you want your career to be in another area of the country, this may hinder you.

Laurie Hall

To be or not to be. . .

Close to home that is. Many students find comfort in knowing that they can easily get home on a weekend for a good night sleep or to do some laundry, others feel just the opposite they see college as a time to adventure away from home. Knowing yourself is the most important and there is no one right answer. To each his/her own.

Ronald Harris

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

Pros of attending in state • Lower tuition cost. • More opportunities for in-state scholarships • Closer to family members. • Easier to travel home for holidays and breaks. Pros of attending out of state • The availability of specialized degree programs. • Reputation of the school, and the chance to network beyond your state. Cons of attending in state • Too close to home. • Not experiencing different cultures. Cons of attending out of state • Higher tuition • Less scholarship offers • Being home sick • Cost with traveling for holidays and breaks.

Ronald Harris

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

Pros of attending in state • Lower tuition cost. • More opportunities for in-state scholarships • Closer to family members. • Easier to travel home for holidays and breaks. Pros of attending out of state • The availability of specialized degree programs. • Reputation of the school, and the chance to network beyond your state. Cons of attending in state • Too close to home. • Not experiencing different cultures. Cons of attending out of state • Higher tuition • Less scholarship offers • Being home sick • Cost with traveling for holidays and breaks.

Ronald Harris

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

Deciding on a college program to attend is difficult, especially when you’re deciding whether to leave your state. There are many different factors to consider when determining whether you want to go to school in state or out of state. Here are some pros and cons to each side. Pros of attending in state • Lower tuition cost. • More opportunities for in-state scholarships • Closer to family members. • Easier to travel home for holidays and breaks. Pros of attending out of state • The availability of specialized degree programs. • Reputation of the school, and the chance to network beyond your state. Cons of attending in state • Too close to home. • Not experiencing different cultures. Cons of attending out of state • Higher tuition • Less scholarship offers • Being home sick • Cost with traveling for holidays and breaks.

Janet Elfers

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

Let’s assume this question relates to public institutions in or out of your state, because if you’re attending a private institution, the tuition will not be different for residents. The benefits of going to a public school ouside your own state? To experience a different social or cultural environment, to enjoy a different climate, to become a fan of a favorite sports team, or because a particular major seems better than those in-state. The drawbacks of going out of state? Large public universities are very similar, and may not be worth the additional costs or additional loans. You might find yourself to be a rarity when most of the students are from their own state (although this could also be a plus if you like to feel special). Going to school far away may seem like an adventure; your high school classmates might be impressed with your courage. Compare colleges carefully before you get too wrapped up in the novelty and excitement of a different state school.

Jennifer GustafsonPrivate CounselorJenni Gustafson

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

The benefits of going to an in-state school are as follows: 1. Most colleges give preference to state residents. 2. If a network of friends is important to you, it is more likely that you will have a few friends or, at least, acquaintances, that will be attending the in-state school with you. 3. Frequent visits home, due to geographical proximity. 4. If you plan on living in your home-state, it will be easier to find a job post-graduation (network opportunities). The benefits of going to an out-of-state school are as follows: 1. The experience of living in a different state, and experiencing it as a full-time student, vs. a tourist. 2. Immersing yourself in a new culture. 3. A “Fresh Start” – you likely won’t know anyone, so you can view it as an opportunity to re-design yourself.

Dominique Ford

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

The benefits and drawbacks of going to school in-state mostly have to do with your comfort level. Ask yourself these questions: How far away am I comfortable moving away from my family? What kind of support system will I use as I progress through my education? Are my friends going to the same school? How often will I want to return home? The benefits and drawbacks of going to school out-of-state depend on your ability to adapt. Ask yourself these questions: How do I acclimate to changes in environment? How self-disciplined am I in regard to staying focused? Can I make new friends easily? Do I want to participate in organizations on campus? Finding the answers to these questions will not only allow you to examine your reasons for choosing a specific school, but it will undoubtedly bring about additional questions that will aid your decision-making process.

Rohit GoyalIvy League CounselorHarvard University

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

If you keep the tuition aside then I find no drawbacks except that you have to live away from family. While benefits are much more. After spending over 16-17 years its time to learn more about the country and world. Living outside home makes you independent and responsible.You tend to learn lot of things which you cannot expect to learn at your home. After you passout, you return as SMART person.

John Happs

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

The benefit is not about in-state vs. out-of-state. It is about fit. Find the right school and the location will also be right.

Shelley KrauseCo-Director of College CounselingRutgers Preparatory School

Look before you leap….to a different state!…

While it seems exciting to meet new people and discover a new part of the country, consider all factors when making that decision. For example, the tuition and fees for out- of-state students may mirror the cost of attendance at a private college, the majority of the students might be from area high schools, the classes might be very large, and post graduate employment opportunities may not be in your area. If cost is a consideration, you may be best served at your own public universities. If cost is not a consideration, consider a full range of college options, from in-state to out-of-state, and from public to private.

Angela ConleyCollege Admission ExpertVentureForth

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

As a public college graduate the benefits of my greatly reduced tuition because of my class rank was not as important then, as was the fact that a quarter of my graduating class was also slated to attend my new alma mater. On the other hand, that was among the most challenging aspect of matriculating at my state’s flagship university; it was way too easy to hold fast to friendships longstanding because of our shared high school experience. While that was something of a drawback, the benefit was many of my “friend’s friends” knew which were the more challenging courses and faculty. In a setting with thousands of course offerings, it was the early version of “rate my professor.” The other enormous benefit was the opportunity to explore graduate programs with less concern about indebtedness because I had so little debt on graduation.

Patty Finer

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

For years families in California have opted for colleges within the University of California system. The school has 9 undergraduate and 10 graduate campuses all with share one common thread. Unfortunately for California Families, even though this year there is a new criteria of California students, there IS a reason to think outside the state: Not all students can get into Stanford, Cal Tech or USC, nor do families want to spend that kind of money. In addition, to the tuition would increases that seem to come on a constant basis sometimes as much as twice a year..the number of available spots is shrinking. In the past ten years the UC price tag has doubled, and freshman enrollment has been cut by 6%. The drawback of looking to an out of state school is that you will pay the out of state tuition, and then if your student wants to transfer back to California which hold the highest standards on many levels and has many of its schools within the top 100 of colleges and universities across the county, the units are not accepted by California universities and colleges… a student must start over again.losing all of their work credit up to date.

Kris HintzFounderPosition U 4 College LLC

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

If we are talking only about public universities, the only real benefit of in-state vs out-of-state is paying less tuition. But sometimes a student who needs to attend a public institution is better off at an out-of-state school, if that school is the better choice for the specific program the student is interested in. Or, perhaps the student wants a certain kind of school atmosphere that is not available in his or her in-state university. For example, maybe a student from Pennsylvania wants a small campus; Penn State University Park, the flagship campus of that state’s university system, may be too big. The student might select the equally competitive, but smaller, SUNY Geneseo, one of the most selective SUNY campuses, which only has around five thousand students.

Eric Beers, Ph.D.College and Career CounselorAir Academy High School

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

I think one huge benefit of going out-of-state is the new perspective and experiences you will draw from. It is great to see how a new culture, society, and region looks at issues, problem solves, and their customs and way-of-life. Too many students do not look outside their comfort “box.” Learning to work and relate to different kinds of people is such an important skill. Another big benefit of going out-of-state is that it forces students to kind of grow up and gain their independence more. Mom and Dad are not just right next door to help them with any problem. It makes students be more outgoing, solve their own problems and find their own resources. A lot of times, children of real helicopter parents, just call home, and mom or dad come up and help them with their problem. Living away from home forces students to reach out to other resources. One of the benefits of going close to home is that your security of having parents, family, friends, former teachers, etc. near you, is nice for any extra help you may need. Going in state means you already know the whether, the pace of life, the recreational activities, and the political climate; it’s less risky. I guess you have to way how much “risk” is good, and how much “risk” will make you grow as a person.

Joshua EarsleyStudent Assistance CoordinatorReach Out

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

The first thing that comes to mind is the way going to school out-of state increases your sense of independence and character. It’s really easy to go to mom and dad when you’re stuck in a jam. Especially in college. When you’re away from home without much access in getting back, you will begin to develop a stronger foundation of coping skills which will help you deal with all kinds of different situations and drama during your college career and for the rest of your life. When parents are always available, it’s easy to go to them for help. And for many teenagers, it’s hard to break that habit because they’ve been accustomed to it their entire lives. I’ve been through this. And at the time I was homesick and wished I was eating my mom’s home cooked meatloaf or partying with my friends. In hindsight, I’m glad I stuck with it. My life now is guided by my motivation, self-concept and goals and the only thing that can stop me is me. At 32 years old I still have friends that live with there parents with no plans of leaving. They all went to local community colleges and eventually dropped out. This is a rather significant benefit in my opinion.

Emily Bloom

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

If you are seeking to widen your horizons and meet people from a variety of backgrounds, attending your state U may not allow you to do so as most other students seeking a more affordable education are going to be from your home state. Also not every state school offers every program. If you are interested in engineering, your state U may not have an engineering school. If you are interested in a joint degree program, completing your undergraduate and graduate schools in a compressed number of years, that may not be an option.

Emily Bloom

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

If you are seeking to widen your horizons and meet people from a variety of backgrounds, attending your state U may not allow you to do so as most other students seeking a more affordable education are going to be from your home state. Also not every state school offers every program. If you are interested in engineering, your state U may not have an engineering school. If you are interested in a joint degree program, completing your undergraduate and graduate schools in a compressed number of years, that may not be an option.

Elton Brooke

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

Going to school in-state may cost you less in the long run especially if you depend on in-state scholarship funds. Travel will typically cost you less when you make those trips home during holidays and semester breaks. On the down side, going to school in-state may limit your college choice. Finding the right college fit may mean that your best school is in another state. Unless you are offered comparable scholarship money to attend the out-of-state school, you may have to eliminate it from your college list. Going to college in another state may mean higher travel expenses. Explore your opportunities before limiting your choice to in-state schools. Look at the whole picture before making your selection.

Renee Boone

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

Attending college in-state may keep you inside your comfort zone. If you are familiar with location and culture, you may find the transition to college less stressful than it might be if you are a stranger in a strange land. However, part of the college experience includes learning how to adjust to new situations. If you attend out of state, you are more likely to encounter students whose geographic and background diversity challenge what you know and push you to consider perspectives that are new to you. Broadening your experience, by attending college out of state, may help you build a solid foundation for later years when you are called upon to work in unfamiliar territory. There are, of course, benefits to going to a college closer to or further away from home. It may be easier for family and old friends to see and accept the new you when you return after having been away for a while than it is for them to recognize your subtle growth when they see you more regularly. Many students find that their skills in independent living and problem-solving are increased when they attend colleges away from home; laundry notwithstanding, as you make daily decisions on your own without the benefit of familiarity, you may find yourself rapidly growing in confidence and self-esteem.

Benjamin Waldmann

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

Familiarity staying at an in-state school will have it’s benefits however if your a student from rural Georgia and you stay in-state to attend a school in downtown Atlanta then you may feel less familiar than moving across the country to study in Oregon. The pace of life and alternation’s in your daily routine’s are more significant to your familiarity than anything else. Sometime’s staying in-state will help if you plan on staying in-state after school as companies may have better familiarity with your education if it is local. Also if you decide to transfer, the process may be a little more efficient if your in-state especially with transferring credit’s although this is not always the case. The obvious convenience of being a little closer to family and friends may also help or not depending on the student and how close they wish to be to they’re home environment. This aside there are many benefits of going to school out of state such as tackling added responsibility, building a bigger base of friends (if you choose to), independence, better chance of joining clubs/sports teams etc… The career you decide to go into after college will probably require you to have strong interpersonal skills and the ability to liaise with different types of people from different backgrounds. By going out of your comfort zone for school you a lot better inclined to take on such beneficial personality traits. The good news is whether you go to a college 5 minutes from your house or 5 hours away by plane, YOU have the ability to make the decisions at college and i would very much recommend going out of your way to meet different types of people and take advantage of clubs/sports or any out of class activities which will enable you to build many attractable personality traits which every employer will find attractive.

Felice KobrickOwner, College Consultant,Kobrick College Consulting, LLC

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

There are so many benefits and drawbacks to understand before you choose an in-state or out-of-state college. One of the most important–the time and expense of travel. How will you get back and forth from home to school? Car? Bus? Train? Plane? Even a school within your own state can necessitate flying back and forth. Look at the options very carefully and factor in the expenses as well as the distance and mode of travel.

Reecy ArestyCollege Admissions/Financial Aid Expert & AuthorPayless For College, Inc.

Tuition aside, what benefits and drawbacks exist by going to school in-state vs. out-of-state?

If the college has the right program, it doesn’t matter where it’s located – period! That’s the primary reason for getting an education.

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