What does the evaluation process look like?

College Admissions

Our counselors answered:

What does the evaluation process look like?

Janet Rapelye

What does the evaluation process look like?

Here is my video response to the question.

Bill Pruden
Head of Upper School, College Counselor Ravenscroft School

What does the evaluation process look like?

The evaluation process is different from school to school, in part because the process as well as the class that results reflects the differing institutional needs of each school. Quite frankly, the less selective the school, the less extensive will be the review they undertake. There simply are not the same choices or the same distinctions being made. In contrast, at truly selective schools the process involves multiple layers of review and a greater number of factors to be considered. For every additional essay that was required, there is more opportunity for distinctions to be made. The greater the number of standardized test that are required, the more places that differences can be discerned. All of this is a piece of a process that is dependent on all of the desired pieces of the community puzzle being filled.

Reecy Aresty
College Admissions/Financial Aid Expert & Author Payless For College, Inc.

What does the evaluation process look like?

It goes something like this: The transcript is reviewed 1st, and if it passes the litmus test, the application will be read; next comes essay review, and lastly LOR's & the interview (there better have been one) are factored in.

Heather Tomasello
Writing Coach The EssayLady, LLC

What does the evaluation process look like?

This varies from university to university, but most make this information readily available on their website. A key rubric is the freshman class profile. What is the average (or median, depending upon which stat the school makes available) incoming freshman high school GPA, and SAT or ACT scores for last year? How do you compare to that profile? You should also feel free to call the admisisons office and ask: 1. How many applications do you expect to receive, and how many students will be offered admission? 2. How much weight is given to the essay as part of the whole application? 3. How much weight is given to grades, test scores, and the resume? 4. How many people evaluate each application? What kind of rubrics are used? Admissions officers should have no problem answering these questions for you. It always shocks me as I work with students, how little they take advantage of this resource.