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Rochester Institute of Technology

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Describe the students at your school.

They are interesting people.

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hard studying students

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Artists and Nerds

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Eager to learn

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cliquey

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I came from a rather sheltered section of Long Island, New York. Coming to RIT opened my eyes to a lot of different cultures considering we have students from all over the world! I'm not a religious person, but there are groups you can be a part of, and there's a chapel that accepts all religious sectors that you can attend. I find that the school is very accepting of all students no matter their gender, sex, race, ethnic or cultural backgrounds, or religion. There are kids that can be grouped between the popular masses depending on their majors: the engineers, the business students, the science and mathematics students, and the arts and photographic arts students. I was in the Naval ROTC program, even though it's held over at the University of Rochester, and I was a Fine Art Photography major at the same time during my freshman year. I felt that I couldn't fit in with either of the two groups of people because I was being judged because of my "artsy" major for someone who wanted to be in the military, and I was typically stereotyped as being a "hardcore conservative" among the photo students, and neither of the allegations were true. You can feel out of place, but then again that happens everywhere. You do see students befriending people who are of the same cultural background, but I find that is also a comfort zone for students who aren't from the United States, and it might help them transition to being in a new environment alongside someone who is experiencing the exact same thing. I know from personal experience that different types of students interact. I just helped a friend dye her hair blue a few weeks ago, yet I am one of the most conservatively dressed people I know. I live in a house with two people who are in the military but I also hang out with self-proclaimed socialists and hippies. Although I am not of religious beliefs, my best friend attends church every Sunday and we don't judge one another. RIT has really been a place where I can fit in, with everyone, by being myself. It has been that simple. The four tables of students in the dining hall I see include a table full of girls and boys from the hockey teams. They are all wearing some sort of RIT hockey pride, where it's a sweatshirt, or pair of pants with the tiger paws down the side. They are eating rather healthy food and sharing lots of laughs. I also see a table full of boys with somewhere unkempt hair and rather interesting facial hair. There are beards, and moustaches I have never seen the likes of, although they are not my personal typical crowd I find myself in, they are very enthusiastic about the latest advance in a new nintendo game that was just released. I see another table full of deaf students. They sign at what feels like 100 mph to me, but I can't turn away because they have the most natural and best reactions to one anothers' stories that I have ever seen. The last table I see is full of photography students. They are sharing their latest projects with one another and nodding at each others' criticisms, accepting the friendly banter along with the constructive advice. Most RIT students I meet are from New York. That happens with most states, the biggest population is usually born or living in that current state. I have seen all different financial backgrounds. I have seen students not pay a dime whether they are on scholarship for an ROTC reason, or because they have a great passion and not enough money to attend the school. A friend of mine worked three jobs as best as he could, with a full course load of 18 credits, while his mother worked two jobs back home across the country, so that he could graduate with the finest degree from the school he loved. There are political groups on campus. Whether you support them or not is your choice, but I feel that everyone should remain respectful. There is a socialist group, but there are also the Army, Air Force, Navy, and Marine cadets on campus that feel offended by their banners and messages at times. Being called "killers" is not something that is taken lightly. There can be harsh words spoken and I'm sure from both sides. I do not mean in any way to offend any socialist whatsoever. I know from experience the beliefs that can be judged from either side, but at least RIT accepts and stands by the freedom of speech. I find that the school is hard to judge politically. It is easy to pick out those who share their opinions openly and freely, but I have learned to stop judging books by their covers. Although I participated in ROTC, I was and still am an independent. And being a photography major doesn't make you a democrat. You have to march to the beat of your own drum, whether you're on the left, right, or middle, that is your decision. You don't have to share your beliefs with everyone you meet. I have found my place in the middle, and that's where I choose to stay. Students share what they plan to earn, or hope to earn, one day. I like to listen to students with plans, who are taking their futures seriously and want to discuss the possibilities of success (financially) that they can and will achieve someday.

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Frats are loud and annoying. Gay/lesbians are very vocal, but not so annoying. Not so much controversy on the religious front, actually. There are a lot of racial/geographic type oriented groups, and they mostly hold fashion shows or dances or stuff like that. Hard to say, actually. Even the most socially inept gremlin will find another equally socially inept troll to hang out with and trade magic cards. Oh, judgmental people need not apply. Even our jocks are dorks. Students wear whatever they want. What kind of question is that? Different students do interact. There are huge culture differences from school to school, but generally there is plenty of interaction. It’s been so long since I’ve paid much attention to the dining halls, but let me take a stab at the question: Table 1- girlfriends forever – two buddy-buddy-share-all-our-secrets girls chit-chatting at a table (one is probably much uglier than the other). Nothing out of the ordinary here. Table 2 – random person with a laptop and/or newspaper. Catching up on work, or writing emails, and eating. Quite acceptable. Table 3 – a group or organization. Maybe it’s a load of animators discussing their group project, or sorority girls, or the tennis team. Table 4 – a bunch of professors. They do dine together, and gossip no doubt. Most students are from New York state. No surprise there. Financial backgrounds: lower middle-class to mid-upper class. Students are politically aware, for the most part. In general, students are moderate, believe it or not (with liberal tendencies, of course – it’s college after all). There are College Republicans and College Democrats. The Repubs have been more easy-going in nature, as I recall, and generally have a better sense of humor. The Dems have always been a bit more rabid. This is probably because the Republicans have been around longer than the Democrats, who (after a first failed attempts) finally developed much later. They’re bitterness is nothing compared to the RIT Socialists, who are a rude, annoying, conspiracy-theory believing, shove-it-down-your-throat bunch of bums. What? Unless you’re one of them, you’d agree. Earn? Not really. We prefer to discuss how much money we blow on booze.

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The people at RIT are just your atypical bunch, yeah sure there are the groups of once high school jocks and preppy bitches, but for the most part it's sad to say, but it's a school for the average nerd/dork/geek/ or whatever. Most the people here got picked on and have a variety of interest. I mean come on how many schools say their largest club is the Animie Club. Being with Deaf students is an experience too. I mean you get used to hearing noises that sound like a seal barking, or the pure passionate moans of sex a few floors below you. Most can't hear at all so why should they care, it catches you off guard at first, and their giggles from all the hearing students, but there's really no difference other than where your "voice" comes from. You don't have to learn sign but knowing some really does help. I mean, at the cafeteria I learned to sign cheese because I always ask for a slice of cheese for my Chicken sandwich, so most of it's just from . I know plenty of people though that don't use any and get along just fine. Expect to see a lot of people from the state of New York, and if you're from a state west of New York (Mid West) like me, everyone has this stigmatism of hillbillies until you get to a major city and then it breaks up and once out of it it starts up again. Nothing horrible just comical, at how New Yorkers know nothing about geography.

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RIT has a pretty diverse campus compared to most, in my opinion. We have a large international student population and a pretty large Muslim group. There are a lot of Asian students (Chinese, Korean, and Japanese) as well. RIT doesn't have a huge population of Hispanics or Blacks to my reckoning. There's a large, open LGBT group at RIT and everyone's very accepting and open. As for socio-economic diversity... it can range. A large majority of kids here are working their way through college and others are riding cushy on their wealthy parents. Most students tend to be pretty casual in dress code to class. It's not uncommon to see the weirder kids at RIT wearing odd costumes such as trench coat guy, shoeless guy, anime cat ear girl chick, and pirate hat wearing dude. As for political affiliation the great majority of RIT students are liberal lefties, but we do have many moderates as well. I've yet to meet a crazy conservative, but that might just be because I'm a computing major and most of my friends are engineers. Most students are going to be quite well off after graduating. Computing and engineer students make a hefty sum right out of college and, even in this bad economy, are having not too harsh a time finding job offers.

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I'm the president of the Hillel, the jewish club on campus. We've yet to encounter direct anti-Semitism, and are currently planning programs with groups of other faiths. Campus Crusade for Christ and the Inter-varsity Christian Fellowship are really eager to have joint programs with us in the coming weeks. The GBLT club is fairly large and they have a lot of campus events. The notoriously hated group is the socialists. Even people who align themselves as socialists politically hate them. I've witnessed them steal money (anti socialist idea, isn't it?) The distribute fliers saying how Israelis are evil, and scream across campus. Infamous nut jobs. Most students are from the North East, though there is a large international and national population. People come from anywhere and everywhere. People range is economic status. One friend is the daughter of an immigrant from mexico where the source of money is a mother who makes five dollars an hour and live in a trailer. Another friend is the son of a prominent NYC lawyer and doctor with a house on Park Ave, NYC and a summer house in the Hamptons. Its a wide range here.

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