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Rochester Institute of Technology

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What are the academics like at your school?

Prof/ Names: Yes they know your name specially if you are a minority with a very strange name like myself lol. Every prof. I've ever had knew my name even in the large 100 student lectures.. why i dont kno... im not one of those people that go and tlk to the prof after class except for those few times I needed help. IF you are in a small class they will def kno your name especially if you stand out somewhow (and i dont just mean race!!!) The BEST classes will have to be the small liberal arts ones, BEautiful teachers I love them. This is probably bias because I'm better at such things but still. They are usually smaller, and I feel like I actually learn things from these teachers and the students that participate (like creative nonfiction, intro to poetry, latin america literature. The BEST class I ever took in RIT is Public SPeaking with Reeves O'Connor. I loved it. EVEryone should take this class. You learn so much about things you never knew in your life from your fellow peers and the speeches they give. I enjoyed this class, and I was sad when it was over (everyone in the class felt this way!) My least favorite classes were the sciences (Chem and Bio class in particular) Over a hundred students... Only 3exams that determine whether you fail or not...ONce again this is bias because Im not a science person eventhough it's my major. Even those who loved were bored though... Everyone studies a different amount depending on the kind of student they are and depending on what class you are taking. The people I know don't study too much though lol (myself included... but hey im too smart for such things). Yeah people participate in most of the classes I've taken as long as they know what the teacher is talking about. I would say kind of.. Intellectual conversation.... yeah kind of. Thats all I have to say about that. I know my friends and i do atimes... Matter fact yes RIT students do have intellectual conversations... I wouldnt say students are competitive. I mean we all want to succeed! This is not H.S where everyone's asking what did you get while the whole class is listening. I think if anything the competition might be more among friends that are in the same class. In my circle we tend to help each other more than anything, and I believe that is representative of other people too.. maybe. I definitely don't feel an atmosphere of competitiveness though maybe I'm just naive, but I highly doubt it. WEll the major thing is a problem/ big secret that I will reveal right now... I was an Ultrasound student so I was in college of science. If you dont love science get out of it quickly!!! It's a pretty cool major though for those that can actually do well in the sciences. I loveedd my advisor (Hamad Ghazle, very popular dude). he was very helpful, great guy overall. I'm in the Exploration program right now and they are pretty good too. I actually learned a lot about myself and what I'd be good in which is something I was unable to do by myself so it definitely was not a waste of my time (I completed general required courses). Im going into business (human resources management). I went to the College of Business office... the advisor i met with was not friendly at all, she was a little to business like for my taste... I mean im not a computer or robot it seemed as if she was jus tryna move on to the next task unlike my other advisors that actaully care. You also dont have a particular adivsor, you just go there and whoever is on duty gets you (how rudee). I like being able to make m own decisions, but she was making it for me when it came to choosing my classes. She barely gave me any eye contact, and I wasn't even given the chance to ask my questions. SO what I'm saying is I DONT like the business department. I've heard of people that spend time with their prof, but not me. If I see a prof I like on my way somewhere, I might talk to them for a few minutes or something like that. There was this one really cool prof. who invited the whole class over for dinner at the end of the quarter (liberal arts once again lol) at her apartement. It was a greatttt experience. I was reluctant at first because I didnt want to be bored, but we all had a great time and the food was goooood!!! RIT's academic requirements are pretty decent I guess. Nothing ridiculous really. SOme classes are excruciatingly difficult (popular one being BIology, chem, UNiversity physics among others) but you just have to do what u have to do!! The thing that makes it hard is the fact that you're learning an enormous amount of work in 10 weeks ... so everything is like thrown at you and you barely have enough time to keep it in ( i dont really like that but it also has it positives). EDucation here is geared towards getting a job, but there are also general education requirements that are just for learning sake. The coops are what really get you the job though.

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Yeah they do. My Film Arts elective was incredible. I learned a great deal about the art of film (imagine that) and the class was incredibly interesting. Normally this wouldn't be a big deal, but I learned more from this one elective than I did from a year and half of classes related to my majors. Also, the professor's lectures were logical, ordered, structured, and appropriate to the audience, and you could tell he actually gave a fuck about the class, which is more than I could say for my other teachers. (And although my major is listed as Psychology, the shitty teachers I reference are from my time as a Networking Major.) My least favorite class was OS Scripting because it was a bunch of fucking bullshit that I never would have used for any practical purpose and the teacher was an asshole. It seems like most of us don't study at all, but I'm probably just more inclined to make friends with lazy scumbags rather than studious individuals. We have many intellectual conversations covering a broad range of topics, which is something I quite enjoy about this school. I don't know many competitive people. It seems most of us are either too jaded to care or didn't care in the first place. Most unique class, again, was Film Arts. Watching and talking about movies six hours a week with an extremely intelligent and well organized professor, you really can't possibly beat that. Can't comment on Psychology as I just switched into it very recently. The Networking department seemed to think that they didn't really have to teach, as anyone who would be in that major loves computer stuff so much that they'll just go out and learn it on their own anyways, so what's the point in teaching it? I think the major was designed specifically for kids with a passion for computer technology, which I just didn't have, so it didn't work out for me. But apparently it works great for other people, so if that's their method of weeding out all the people who don't belong, then I guess they're doing their job. (I don't mean that to sound sarcastic, that's just honestly how it seems. I don't fault them for it or hold a grudge, but I do think it's an accurate appraisal of the situation.) I rarely spend time with professors outside of class, but when I have, it has been good. Three of my professors have taken me and other students out to dinner, and a group of faculty took us to an internet cafe to kill each other in computer games, which is always fun. Academic requirements are pretty lenient, which is good since it seems like it doesn't take much to fuck your grades up pretty bad. Especially at a quarter-system school where one bad test can have devastating results. RIT doesn't punish you stuff like that unless you screw up repeatedly. Getting a job! Screw the learning, go get a career and send us donations.

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Professors know my name, it may take them a week or 3, but they get it. This is fine. My favorite class, right now, is New Media Team Project II because I get to implement my skills with video on a school project where my work will be shown to the masses constantly. My least favorite class, right now, is Newswriting, because the professor does not explain herself very well, and I don't feel like I'm learning anything. Students, myself, usually study 5-10 hours a week. Class participation is common. RIT students are capable of having intellectual conversations out of class, and does happen. Some students are competitive, which is good as long as it is a fun competition. The most unique class I've taken has been Theatre Arts(Fine Arts). My school/department is CIAS, and my major is New Media Publishing. This is a combination of print, web, and design. Students get a chance to design web sites, get them to work, and produce projects that they can use for their portfolio. Print students get to use actual presses, and have the chance to go on an ocean liner to do printing that is used the next day. The design work that students do have to do with both web and print. Some projects that are made are actual books that are produced for a group or organization off campus. I do spend time with professors outside of the classroom. I agree with RIT's academic requirements, but some I am not sure about. Data Analysis II should not be required for New Media students. RIT is geared towards both getting a job, and for learning sake. You need to learn certain skills, and then are shown how to implement them in real projects.

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Depending on what classes you're enrolled in, there's either a good chance the professor knows every person in the class, or a chance that you're just another face in the crowd. Freshman lectures tend to be impersonal, but once you get into your "core" classes that pertain to your major, professors get to know you much better. In a seventy person marketing class this past fall, my professor actually took the time to learn everyone's name - impressive. There are professors that make you want to go to class and those that make you want to stay as far away as possible. Students are competitive in most cases, but it makes it interesting. I'm in the Multidisciplinary program, which combines classes from a variety of chosen majors, so I'm not exclusively involved in one department, but I still find it easy to get to know the professors in each department and get help when I need it. For the most part, everyone is very approachable. Academic requirements are usually pretty fair - the liberal arts credits are easy to fill up, especially if you come in with AP credits, and the math and sciences aren't excruciating. The beautiful thing about the RIT curriculum is how easy it makes it to find a job after graduating. The job fairs and co-op advisors really help you to find co-ops and internships in your respective fields, and help you to gain the experience that employers look for after graduation. Of course, it still takes a lot of effort on our part as the student, but it's worth the work.

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Do professors know your name? Yes Tell us about your favorite class. My favorite class was a creative writing class. All the students were very talkative and fun and everybody was eager to share stories. Least favorite? An abnormal phycology class. Way to much work and stupid/quiet people in the class. Later that teacher was killed by a snowplow so lets not speak ill of the dead. How often do students study? Too much or at least they do don't come out of there rooms enough. Is class participation common? No fucking way. Do RIT students have intellectual conversations outside of class? About RPGs and First Person Shooters. Are students competitive? With video games What's the most unique class you've taken? Editing the literary magazine. Tell us about your major / department. I was a fine art photography major. My department was good and had a lot of nice teachers but the photo department as a whole is very business like and seemingly anti-art. Do you spend time with professors outside of class? No How do you feel about RIT 's academic requirements? They are fine. I just don't like the quarter system. Is the education at RIT geared toward getting a job, or learning for its own sake? It is definitely geared to getting a job but my department (fine art photography) is not really geared to anything. It is very laze-fair.

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I think the variety of courses offered at RIT is what I love the most about the school. Most of the classes are small, roughly around 20 kids, unless it's a class that everyone in your major has to take, in that case you will probably have a large lecture, and then a small lab class if it has a lab. Class participation is very common in every class that i've had, and students study VERY hard. Because we are on the quarter system things move much faster than semesters. I'm not sure about other majors, but I know that in mine the students are very competitive, but not in a way that hinders others. Everybody helps eachother out WHENEVER we ask for help, but subconsciously we all know we're going to be competing for the same jobs when we graduate so we constantly compare ourselves to eachother. I don't spend much time with my professors outside of class, but if I needed to I know that they would be available for me. Our academic requirements are pretty simple and straight forward, and I think that they suit each major well. Lastly, my college in particular is geared towards getting us good jobs when we graduate. We have constant opportunities to meet Alumni that come speak with us, heads of companies, representatives, famous photographers, meet and greet with really important people.

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The classes here are fairly small for the most part. Most professors make an effort to know their students, especially if you ask questions and let them know that you are there. Most students study mainly for exams, but not much in between them. Even as an engineering major, I didn't study much for the majority of my classes. RIT students try to leave school out of their social lives as much as possible. As far as intellectual conversations outside of class, they happen, but only in typical discourse, it's not usually a point to make conversation of projects that are going on. There are a very select number of professors that hang out with students outside of class, typically at a bar at the end of the day for a beer or two, but that's about it. The education at RIT isn't geared for getting a job or learning for its own sake, it's just there. It's up to the students to decide what to do with it. The co-op program is there to make students get into the industry and see if they like what they are studying. I think most students use what they learn at RIT just to get a job, but some of them really enjoy what they are learning and thrive on discovering new knowledge.

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You have to be smart to go here. RIT puts a lot of focus on their academic success. I have taken so many classes because I love to learn. My favorite classes have included Symbol and Icon class, Wines of the World, Massage Therapy, and Metals. I'm a graphic design student, so my freshman year I had to take foundation classes, which were a pain at the time because we put in tremendous amounts of hours on projects, but looking back in it, it was worth it. My second year, we learned the fundamentals of graphic design, and this year, we art applying them to portfolio worthy pieces. Every year I get quicker with my skills and create more conceptually stronger designs. When I was interning this summer, my boss would always ask why I worked so quickly. That's what I'm used to at RIT. I don't think that my friend studying graphic design at another school has the same learning experience as I do. We have great professors with tremendous dedication, up-to-date facilities with the biggest computers I have seen, a fantastic library, and other fabulous resources.

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The academics here at RIT are exceptional. Every professor I have had here so far knows my name and some of the classes I have had are pretty big. Studying is something that you need to do here if you want to do well. Most professors encourage debate throughout class to get students involved. Sometimes the workload can be overwhelming, but it prepares us for the work we will need to do after graduation. My major is New Media Interactive Development in the Interactive Games & Media department. It is unlike anything I thought I would be doing at this point in my life. In this major, students use Adobe products to get work done, whether it be Adobe Photoshop or Adobe Flash. When I was young and was asked what I wanted to do when I grow up, I never thought designing websites and making Flash games and programs would be an option. At RIT, it is. The best part is, I know I will have work after I graduate from RIT because some programs at RIT require co-op, so I will have the experience I need to get a good job after graduation.

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The smaller departments will have more personalization than the larger departments. A lot of professors will take the time to know their students' names, especially if they have more than one class with that student. Most of the time a student needs to make an effort to get recognized in his or her department. Answering questions in class or turning in unique work will sometimes get one noticed. I am in the School of Film and Animation in the College of Imaging Arts and Sciences. There are not a lot of students in our degree, so the professors know most of us by name. Most of the classes are small and hands-on, so the professors will recognize students by their work as well. Rarely do I see professors outside of class, but most of them are adjunct, so you rarely see them. Most have office hours where you can pop in and just say "hi" or ask a question about an assignment (even if it's for another class).

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