Rutgers University-New Brunswick Top Questions

What are the academics like at your school?

William

My major is professional physics at Rutgers. It has many professors who graduated from elite universities and top notch researchers. Rutgers offers more than $700 million in research funds, and many research opportunities are available to students. Rutgers also require a core curriculum for arts & science students so we can explore the many different tastes of the world and history.

Lauren

Courses are challenging, transferring into the SEBS Landscape Architect program this past fall has had its late nights. Looking back in just 6 months I have developed relationships with professors and students, skills that seemed impossible and an entire new language. Overall the challenges have been met because I have also been given tools and guidance in order to succeed.

Neha

Very Diverse

Daniel

The academics are generally extremely interesting, yet intensive. As an english major, the majority of my classes have less then 30 people in the class, allowing all of my professors to know me by name, which allows for a personal relationship, and advice during office hours. The students aren't competitive with each other at all, we just attempt to help each other learn new things by asking questions and pointing out things that someone else might not notice. There is a variety and range of classes in the english department that i've taken ranging from Black Writers in the 1960's to creative writing to a class based on Charles Dickens and George Eliot. I haven't enjoyed all of the required classes i've had to take, specifically the classes in which the readings are in middle english. I did have a class last semester, medieval drama which I was skeptical about, but ended up with a great professor, Sarah Novacich who made the class interesting and even fun.

Ryan

As I have said before the academics at Rutgers is outstanding. Unfortunately, due to our label as a state school, our academic level is underestimated by many prospective students and current freshman. The harsh reality is that many freshman focus too much on the social aspect of college and forget that professors aren't going to be able to memorize your name when you're just 1 out of 300 students in a lecture hall. You need to make a name for yourself and connect with the professors any way you can. By doing that and taking advantage of study groups and networking with such a large class size, you'll be able to excel in the work heavy courses. There is definitely a sense of competitiveness in most of the introductory science and math courses as the university is siad to use these classes to "weed out" the unmotivated kids. In my Introduction to Sociology course, the professor told the class about an interesting label for our university. Rutgers is a "Research I" university which means that all members of staff are actively performing their own research in their respective fields. I tok advantage of this by doing a year of research in the Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center on campus under the School of Psychology graduate students. This was an amazing experience that not only looks fantastic on a resume for post undergraduate studies, but lets your immerse yourself into the field of your choice and see what goes on behind the scenes. The Rutgers environment is definitely geared towards the career world with many emails weekly detailing seminars and places to connect with employment opportunities. Class participation is always present, but in my opinion promotes much more intellectual discussions in the smaller classes.

Kate

I have been in a few different types of classes at Rutgers. There are big lectures, small recitations, and in between classes of maybe 20 students. No matter the size of the class, if you participate in class or see your professor at office hours, he or she will know your name. At this school, it is all about personal determination to make yourself known. Professors and TAs are there to help you, but as with any college, no matter what the class size, it is your responsibility to ask questions and voice your opinions. Class participation is common and often factored into final grades. The most unique class I have taken at Rutgers was a philosophy class called "Eating Right: The Ethics of Food Choices and Food Policy" taught by professor Andy Egan. The class consisted of two weekly lectures of about 200 students, and one weekly recitation led by a TA. The lectures were fascinating and often featured guest speakers. We read recently published books by prominent and controversial authors. The conversations held in my recitation were engaging. Rutgers School of Arts and Sciences offers "Signature Courses" each semester that are designed by Rutgers professors to provoke the curiosity and interest of Rutgers students, while filling requirements too. The School of Arts and Sciences has a foundational core curriculum that all students must complete in addition to at least one major and one minor. These requirements will provide graduates with a liberal arts base and a diverse body of knowledge, and keeps them busy at the same time. Students are at an advantage if they know what they wish to major in early, but for those who are unsure, the liberal arts requirements are a great place to start the first few semesters. It is no lie that taking a class for a requirement might spur a passion or interest. I took Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies my first semester of freshman year to fulfill a requirement, and the class was so inspiring that I continued to take WGS classes, and I am working toward a WGS minor in addition to my English major.

Eli

Class sizes are large, especially for introductory-level classes, but that is to be expected. As one goes farther along one's major, one will see familiar faces and shrinking class sizes. If one participates and goes to a professor's office hours, they will know who you are. Studying seems to be contingent on what classes one takes. For instance, a roommate of mine does biology/chemistry, and he studies so often that seeing him becomes a rare occurrence. On the other hand, majors such as mine (political science) require that I read and understand concepts, along with utilizing my critical thinking abilities. Class participation is also contingent on the class. If a professor encourages participation, then it is more likely to happen. If a professor simply lectures for an hour and twenty minutes, then students are less likely to participate. Intellectual conversations is dependent on who is talking. If the people discussing aren't in the same field of study, then typically conversations won't be deeply intellectual, unless there is an interest in one's field of study. My most unique class was probably my political science seminar this past semester, European Union Law & Politics. Instead of a lecture, we had what could be described as round-table discussions about the formation of the EU, its legal foundations and its current predicaments. I liked that it encouraged participation from every student, and that it was interesting. At Rutgers, unfortunately there is no international relations department, so all classes that would otherwise be dedicated to international relations are fitted under political science. The major itself has many interesting classes, and if I had more time, I'd honestly take more of them. I personally don't spend time with professors outside of class, but that's mostly because I don't do research with them. The school's academic requirements are decently high, though Rutgers has a very high acceptance rate. What is more important to look at is the amount of students who continue on to their second and third years at Rutgers. The education (at least in political science) is geared towards giving information on the field of politics and international relations historically, theoretically, and pragmatically.

Max

The academics at Rutgers are unique. As a freshman, most classes are in giant lecture halls that hold about five hundred students at a time. These giant lectures are mainly for introductory courses. I would be lying if I said that students weren't just a number in these classes, however, if students want to talk to their professors or get involved, it is greatly welcomed. Professors always stay after class to answer questions students may have, or even just to chat about related topics. As you walk through campus, you will undoubtedly hear students discussing or debating about current events or topics discussed in their courses. As students progress through semesters, they will notice that their classes shrink drastically in size, dropping from four or five hundred to under thirty. This is because as students get farther into their majors, classes become more specific and individualized. For example, as an English major, instead of Introduction to Creative Writing, I have moved on to classes dedicated to single authors, such as Henry James, in a class of twelve students. My favorite class was a course called, Creative Non-fiction. In this course I practiced writing non-fiction articles and stories on topics of my choice, an idea in which I am extremely interested. I make use of office hours with professors; it is at these times where I can meet with a professor one-on-one and discuss my assignments, issues in the course, or even material outside of the course that is related to what we are discussing in class. As for the academic requirements, each school at Rutgers has different graduation requirements. Students are set on a path to graduate within four years, and this goal is very do-able. The average semester includes five courses, or a total of roughly fifteen credits. Internships are a requirement for most majors, so while most of your college career you are focusing on education, the later years focus heavily on getting a job in the real world. There is a very healthy balance between education and experience.

Karan

Most of the professors know my name. My favorite class through out the 3 years i have been here was Social Informatics. The professor always had good topics to discuss and the projects were fun and interactive. My least favorite class right now is Networking and Internet Technology. Students that are in my class always tend to study when necessary. Class Participation is always common, especially in my major. Our discussions about the impact of technology and social media on the society are always thought provoking and intellectual. We sometimes leave the class discussing about the same thing, but we quickly switch over to recent events, parties, and talks of movies. Students are fairly competitive. It mainly depends on the class. The most unique class i have taken is Social Informatics. It was the one class i always looked forward to go to. I am an Information Technology major. The ITI major places emphasis on the evaluation, implementation, use, and management of information technologies for a wide range of organizations and corporations, as well as the social and organizational aspects of information and communication technologies. I don't usually speak to the professors outside of class unless it's a question about an upcoming test or a project. The school's academic requirements are not easy and not too difficult. They keep the students busy and striving to excel. I think the education at the school is geared at getting a job, and learning for it's own sake. Learning and having a thought of your own will better help you in finding a job. It set you apart from the others

LauraMallalieu

Academics at Rutgers are almost as varied as the students. Rutgers offers over 100 undergraduate degree programs, and is a great school for a variety of different majors. I personally, am coming to Rutgers as valedictorian of my high school to become a Philosophy major. Rutgers is consistently one of the top 2 or 3 Philosophy programs in the nation, along with NYU and Princeton. Students in Rutgers are generally a pretty good mix between those that are committed and those who are just there for the ride. The best classes are those in your major at a higher level. That's where deeper discussion emerges. Unfortunately, there are a lot of large lecture classes where it may be difficult to pay attention, but those classes are generally 101 level, and as you advance, things only get better. The majority of my classes are about 20-25 people large, with engaging professors that make the material interesting.

Max

The academics at Rutgers are unique. As a freshman, most classes are in giant lecture halls that hold about five hundred students at a time. These giant lectures are mainly for introductory courses. I would be lying if I said that students weren't just a number in these classes, however, if students want to talk to their professors or get involved, it is greatly welcomed. Professors always stay after class to answer questions students may have, or even just to chat about related topics. As you walk through campus, you will undoubtedly hear students discussing or debating about current events or topics discussed in their courses. As you progress through semesters, students will notice that their classes shrink drastically in size, dropping from four or five hundred to under thirty. This is because as students get farther into their majors, classes become more specific and individualized. For example, as an English major, instead of Introduction to Creative Writing, I have moved on to classes dedicated to single authors, such as Henry James, in a class of twelve students. My favorite class was a course called, Creative Non-fiction. In this course I practiced writing non-fiction articles and stories on topics of my choice, and idea in which I am extremely interested. I make use of office hours with professors; it is at these times where I can meet with a professor one-on-one and discuss my assignments, issues in the course, or even material outside of the course that is related to what we are discussing in class. As for the academic requirements, each school at Rutgers has different graduation requirements. Students are set on a path to graduate within four years, and this goal is very do-able. The average semester includes five courses, or a total of roughly fifteen credits. Internships are a requirement for most majors, so while most of your college career you are focusing on education, the later years focus heavily on getting a job in the real world. There is a very healthy balance between education and experience.

Shelby

The academics at Rutgers, from what I've experienced, have been very good. The professors are always willing to make time for you, especially if you're struggling, and the grades are very fair. I am double majoring in English and Psychology and I find these to be two vastly different experiences. English classes are generally small with high student participation, whereas Psychology classes tend to be large lectures. However, every psychology class I've taken has actively encouraged student participation and questioning of the validity of experiments. I find this to be beneficial because it encourages students to question experimental results, which is the basis for progress in scientific fields. Rutgers also offers a great deal of unique classes that often fulfill requirements for graduation. There are also many resources, including deans, that are available for help in deciding what to major in, what to take, and to help you find out if you are on the right track, academically.

James

As George Washington once said, "I cannot tell a lie", I too must not lie when I say that the academic aspect of Rutgers is challenging. It is challenging, but it is worth it; students here will use self discovery of information, allowing them to take so much out of thier studies. Students here either study numerous hours on end or very few; the students that study very few hours a week find that their system just does not work. Diligence in one's studies is crucial and, yes, there is time for casual relaxation, but when it is time to buckle down and do work, it is time. The educational goal here can be career spacific, such as an engineer major, which will prepare a student for getting a job. There are also courses that are geared to learning in its own respect, such as a global diversity class; students may not be directly prepared for a job through courses such as these, however, they will take so much from the courses into the workfield with them.

Mara

The academics at Rutgers are great. There are so many options in majors and minors that there is something for everyone. I spent most of my first year and half taking so many different "Intro" classes until I finally found what interested me. I decided on joining the Rutgers School of Communication and Information (SCI) to be a Journalism and Media Studies major. I absolutely love it. It is amazing to have a smaller community within Rutgers. The SCI administration is extremely helpful in planning schedules and giving advice on what classes to take. The classes are small and the professors really know what they are doing. SCI also has a great internship program that I am currently participating in and they send daily e-mails on internship and job listings in the area. I also really enjoy the media classes because we focus on current issues and learn skills applicable to any job. My minor is English, another great academic community at Rutgers. I like the requirement of a minor because I am able to learn a great deal in more than just one subject. I have friends in so many different academic areas of Rutgers its hard to believe we all go to the same school! But, that is part of the reason I love it so much.

Mara

The academics at Rutgers are great. There are so many options in majors and minors that there is something for everyone. I spent most of my first year and half taking so many different "Intro" classes until I finally found what interested me. I decided on joining the Rutgers School of Communication and Information (SCI) to be a Journalism and Media Studies major. I absolutely love it. It is amazing to have a smaller community within Rutgers. The SCI administration is extremely helpful in planning schedules and giving advice on what classes to take. The classes are small and the professors really know what they are doing. SCI also has a great internship program that I am currently participating in and they send daily e-mails on internship and job listings in the area. I also really enjoy the media classes because we focus on current issues and learn skills applicable to any job. My minor is English, another great academic community at Rutgers. I like the requirement of a minor because I am able to learn a great deal in more than just one subject. I have friends in so many different academic areas of Rutgers its hard to believe we all go to the same school! But, that is part of the reason I love it so much.

Jennifer

As far as I know, majority of Rutgers professors have a fairly strict attendance policy; if you miss a certain amount of classes per semester, you automatically fail. Now, for certain classes, I think this is fair but for others, I think the professors needs to give a bit more leeway; if you are attending a college/university, you are old enough to decide if you want to go to class and it shouldn't take an attendance policy to make you want to go to class. I also think it's hard for professors to get to know everyone because some classes are just too big (we're talking 300-400+ students in some classes). I am an English major so for the most part, my classes are relatively small and because I tend to be more outspoken, my teachers get to know me. I also take advantage of office hours because I like to know how I'm progressing and I like to know that I'm getting a lot out of the class (most of the English teachers are very helpful during office hours and are very open to setting up a meeting time if you can't meet during their given office hours). My only complaint is what the English teachers are preparing us for. I think most of the English classes I've taken have been more geared towards learning material, rather than what English is really for and that is analysis. I have only come across one English professor who taught us to be more open-minded and expand our thinking when reading a text and being able to apply it to other things (we weren't just learning about 18th century authors and the books they wrote). Overall, I think the school's academic requirements are fair; My complaint, although many might not agree, is that I felt like I had too many general requirements to fulfill. I entered college knowing what I wanted to do and I spent a good amount of time taking classes I was completely bored and uninterested in and failed many (obviously others factors played into this but I probably would have had a better time if I got to study what I was interested in). There is no option, however, for someone like me, who wants to be an English major, to go directly into an English program; I had to go through all the math (even after placing into a college level math course) and science courses still. I understand why colleges do this; they want to give students who don't know what they want to do in the future an opportunity to explores their options and take courses in different areas to see what interests them. Direct programs at Rutgers generally help students in only a few areas, such as pharmacy or nursing. It would be nice if Rutgers expanded this options to others who don't feel a need or want to take courses that will never help them in their future career.

Neha

Rutgers is a huge school the largest class I had, had about 300 kids in it. In a case like this teachers do not know your name you are simply a number. It is your TA that has a more personal relationship with you-they give you grades, they answer your questions, and they write you your recommendation letters. The smallest class I did have was like 7 kids, but this was like a Freshman Interest Group (FIGS) - it's just a easier way for freshman to meet each other and discuss topics that pertain to that class, meeting people who might be majoring in the same thing as you. My least favorite class was Planet Earth, at Rutgers if you are apart of the SAS program (School of Arts and Sciences) you have to completely 2 science requirements. They say Planet Earth is one of the easiest science courses here but honestly, I was struggling to even pass. It depends, if youre in a program, kids have to maintain a certain GPA to stay in the program and other kids just do what they want when they want - depends on one's own study ethics. If you're passionate about something, at Rutgers you will find someone who believes in the same thing too - just join a group or go to the Club Fair and see what the school has to offer. Students are competitive but it just matters what department, Science is more competitive than communications. The most unique class I have taken was a Public Service class in which you mentor New Brunswick High School students. Working with them closely academically and helping them graduate high school and move forward to college (Rutgers University) My major is Political Science, and I have had many TA's - but there was one professor who taught so well, that I am now a research assistant for a database he's working on. There are so many opportunities, student's just have to go to office hours and really have a strong interest in it because Professors are helpful in any aspect and are willing to talk and compromise about a grade, recommendation letter or even research assistant. the Requirements for classes vary it depends which program you're in or what school you're in but the deans are no help - I have heard from many people that the deans are not helpful and put your down if you are not Einstein. I've heard from various people that there's only a couple of good deans who really want to help. There are many internship, co-op, leadership programs that can further your career interests. There is also the career services which is just based on the transition from college to post-college (JOBS)

Leena

Sometimes people equate "state school" with "sub-par education". Not at Rutgers! We have some of the best academic programs in the state, and even the country. Our Philosophy department is always heralded as being one of the best. The Business and Pharmacy schools are also renowned. And Rutgers is known to have one of the greatest English departments in the state. We also have some awesome professors. I've enjoyed the majority of my professors so far at Rutgers. Most of them take the time to learn your name, and some even request mandatory office hours meetings in the beginning of term in order to get to know the students even further. I'm and English major, and so far I've been pretty impressed with my department. The other kids in my classes are great too. It's easy for us to get into passionate debates about books we're reading, or to really push the envelope of analyzing the text. The most unique class I've ever taken at Rutgers was one called The Apocalypse in Film and Literature. The class was discussion based, which means we had no papers, midterms, or finals, only short quizzes at the beginning of class to make sure we were completing the reading. We concentrated on the various ways the "apocalypse" could happen and how they are portrayed in class. An interesting tactic the professor used to get us to participate was making us all stand up, and only allowing us to sit down once we contributed something to the discussion. One thing to know about Rutgers is that they do have general requirements. As a student in the School of Arts and Sciences, I'm required to complete two science courses, two math courses, and a variety of humanities courses. I'm also required to complete a minor (mine is American Studies). Even though it's a state school, the education at Rutgers is still amazing. We're well known for our academics, and you will definitely be challenged to learn as a student here.

Jerry

The academic experience definitely depends on what classes you take. The entry and beginning level courses are usually packed regardless of major, but can definitely shrink in size at the higher levels. My Industrial Engineering graduating class was approximately 30 students where everyone knew each other. Classes (even non-engineering) are generally rigorous and require more than a half-hearted approach. Libraries and student centers will be filled by students studying even outside of midterms and finals. Student competition is fairly low, but again could definitely depend on your major. I found professors generally accessible, though there are always those certain ones who are hard to find or unhelpful either intentionally or not. I think this should be expected in a school of this size. For each poor professor there is a good one, and finding out which is which will not be hard. Career Services does a tremendous job in helping students find internships, co-ops, and full-time jobs. There are many workshops, seminars and networking opportunites for all majors. These events are organized at all levels: Career Services, your individual school, your major, your department, and student organizations. Like extracurriculars, you get whatever you put into it, but the opportunities are there. Many study abroad opportunities to many different places. There are even programs offered by individual departments in addition to the overall Rutgers Study Abroad program. Some courses and the Industrial and Systems Engineering curriculum in general leave a lot to be desired. It's in that transition phase from teaching older traditional concepts that pertained to manufacturing and machining to newer, more modern topics such as supply chain, computer simulation, Six Sigma and modelling. Most if not all students prefer the newer concepts and don't see the broad usefulness of the older ones, myself included. However, it is a very strong academic experience which teaches work ethic, time management, and professionalism along with the book material.

Ryan

First and second year classes are huge regardless of major. More difficult majors will whittle down to maybe 15 person class sizes by senior year. The math department is fantastic with a few exceptions but the economics department is pretty awful despite having such a high enrollment. Professors in the math department are very helpful outside of the classroom and the students are eager to work with each other. Rutgers really offers a world class education at a bargain price but just as anywhere else you really have to work for it.

Charlotte

Classes range from insanely large at the lower levels (400 student+ classes at the 100 level) to the very intimate (My Wallace Stevens seminar had 6 students in it. It was wonderful). Class participation is required in higher level classes, and is lively. In the big, lecture classes, there's usually none. And there's everything in between. Conversations from class often spill out, and students work together when studying and argue over books in the bars. The teachers run the gamut, too, and it really depends what department you're interested in. It's the kind of school where, if you want to really work hard, you will get a great education, and if you want to squeak by you can do that too. No one's really going to MAKE you do anything. Classes 300 level and above are very challenging. As an English major routinely taking 5-6 classes per semester, I was writing at least 4 papers per week, and finals were mind boggling. For such a large school, Rutgers is unusually academically rigorous at the upper levels.

Betsy

Students aren't as competitive as they would be at Ivy League schools but this doesn't mean that the subjects aren't difficult to master. One subject in particular gives even the smartest students trouble. This subject is none other than Expository Writing 101. The writing program at Rutgers is demanding and I'm grateful for this since self-expression through writing is integral to any and every career path one chooses.

Alex

professors do not know my name. i tend to stay in the back and go on my laptop and write this survey haha. my favorite classes are the ones that are so easy i dont have to go to them. my least favorites are ones with teachers who do not know how to teach well. students study all the time. class participation is i guess alright. its is not like high school where you can kinda fool around, sometimes you do, but not really. alot of intellectual conversations go on, especially with the realli smart kids. you hear them talking about sciences, politics, or anything uncommon while ur eating or on the buses or whatever. students are not competitive, atleast not that i know of. im sure if you are applying for a school with a major then maybe, but for the most part i dont know. i havnt takin any crazy classes and my major is communications. i dont spend any time with my professors and the academic requirements are managable. education is geared toward whatever you want to major in. your major determines if its more for a job or ur own sake.

ryan

Most of my professors do not know my name which actually doesnt bother me. I know that they recognize me from participating a lot in class and thats all that i ask for. Academics are very competitive here. I just recently was admitted into the business school, and only 400 students are admitted per year out of the 40,000+ students that go here. Now everyone that didnt get in has to change their major and figure out what they want to do. also the pressure is on me for the next to years not to slip below a 3.4 gpa or else i get the boot. The education here is for getting a job, beacuse Rutgers offers so many programs to help get jobs and train you to get jobs, mock interviews, teaches us how to write resumes, how to approach employers at career fairs.

Akira

I have one professor slash Dean that I took two classes with because she is an amazing orator and because she is well, nice. She teaches two courses on community issues and got me to thinking about how I was impacting my own community. After taking her advice to study abroad, I came back with what I thought was a greater understanding of my culture and I decided to establish a group in my Rutgers community. When I decided to create it I wanted her to become the advisor because I felt that she would give well, for lack of a better term, great advice. She kindly and willfully declined on the first try and I was very dissapointed and through various actions let her know so but, as a student I should have known that the title of Dean does not come from passiveness when challenged. So for months she showed me just how my immature actions were not going to get me what I wanted and actually expressing myself effectively will. It wasnt the most traditional way of teaching but it was the most effective for someone as strong willed aka stubborn as I am. So therefore, by her efforts, I have found that Rutgers has a very eclectic way of teaching, for instance it involves studying and applying not just directly but indirectly as well, and that is why it works!!!

Kevin

The professors definitely do not know your name. On being a math major/taking math classes at rutgers: The Grad Students/Assistant Professors are amazing. The tenured professors (for the most part) don't give a shit about you. I've had tests that literally set you up for failure. Students study a lot. In terms of intellectual conversations, in the math program, not really. The philosophy program (that's my minor) however...the students participate A LOT (especially the upper level courses) and you will always end up in some sort of intelectual conversation after class. I have yet to take a class that was career-oriented in any shape or form.

Taylor

The only professor to know my name was also the only name of a professor that I remember; Professor Norman Markowitz. He taught a class on the 1960's when i was a Sophmore. Since then I wish I had lived in the 1960's

Tim

Academics, like all schools, are good... and you'll only get out what you put into it. In other words, there are great majors with great course offerings taught by awesome professors, but none of that will matter to someone who doesn't go to class/read or puts no effort in.

Amy

There isn't enough time, during a student's four years at Rutgers, to take classes they're simply interested in. There's no time to dabble. Every class you take must be specifically geared toward you're core or major requirements. If by chance Freshmen year you take a course that does not count for either, you'll likely have to take a summer class to graduate on time. Rutgers is an excellent education, especially for the cost of undergraduate tuition. Many in state students won't have nearly as much debt to deal with after they graduate then students from other universities that may not even be as prestigious as Rutgers. The University education is affordable. The textbooks are not. Many students pay for their textbooks out of their own pocket. If a student is taking 5 classes, it's likely their textbook total will amount to almost $400! This is incredible. Sometimes books can go up to $100 just for one class. I feel that professors need to be much more sensitive to cost when they select the required readings for their classes. Students should try to find out what textbooks they'll need before the semester starts, and try websites like Half.com, Facebook Marketplace, etc. These places may offer the books at a fraction of the Rutgers/NJ Bookstore costs.

Taylor

It's hard to not just be another face in the crowd. Most professors know my name because I am a class officer. I often try to make it a point to meet professors, but some of them seem uninterested. In my years at Rutgers, it's clear to me that some professors are here to teach, while others are here for research. I find that some (certainly not all) of the professors here for research seem uninterested in teaching. Some lecturers just seem like they can't wait for class to end and leave students utterly confused because they don't care enough. Howeve, Rutgers has done a pretty good job at avoiding this problem through constant re-evaluations. As far as the academic requirements, I often hear of people who have to stay extra time because they forgot about a class. But administration has taken this to heart in attempts to destroy the prevalence of the "RU Screw". As an orientation leader for the past year, I learned about how the administration has improve access to the deans by putting them in the student centers, hired more staff to help with any psychological problems, and in general, made the happenings at a large institution more transparent. They even introduced a program, degree navigator, which can now make sure students will graduate on time by telling them their remaining requirements. While there is room for improvement, I have already seen better things developing in my 3 years. However, if you are not motivated enough to take an interest in your college work and where you will take it, I would not recommend Rutgers because it is very easy to get lost.

Sam

Most classes at Rutgers are huge. I still have lecture halls full of hundreds of people for my Psych classes, but that's partly because it's such a popular major. As such, getting to know professors is hard. Most have office hours and will meet with you, but you have to assert yourself or else you'll go unnoticed. Rutgers is like a micro-system of the real world, so we have everything here. Academics range from lazy frat boys who never study to premed students who live in the library. We're a research university, and if you're looking for a challenging school, you won't be lacking competition. Again, if you're motivated, you can do anything here.

Dale

Rutgers is huge. There are great professors and not so great professors, so your experience in the classes will vary not so much on the subject material, but rather the professor themselves. Talk to students, and use websites like this one, to find the right professor for you.

Patrick

The thing about Rutgers is that professors don't have to know your name if you don't want them to, but at the same time they are for the most part very approachable and willing to help if you need it. My favorite class was probably Molecular Biology/Biochemistry, where I had a very passionate and dedicated professor who made daily connections to every day life from the world of biochemistry. My least favorite class was by far Calculus I, because I unfortunately got a very bad professor (which is a bit uncommon, I must say; I've generally liked all my other professors) Student studying time really depends on what major you take; science majors tend to do a lot more studying than liberal arts majors. Class participation is very important for many professors, despite the sometimes large class sizes. Rutgers students overall are very intelligent and down-to-earth people; they're smart but not intellectually "snooty" or "snobbish" Students within science programs are generally the most competitive. The most unique class I've taken is my psychology class, which is more of a therapy session than a class. My major, Cell Biology and Neuroscience, has many dedicated and well-trained scientists, all of whom currently conduct research within the field, enabling them to be extremely knowledgeable and make connections within the classroom. Rutgers academic requirements are manageable, but must not be taken lightly; many students do not graduate on time because they make poor decisions in what classes to take and/or have to re-take classes because they failed them. Learning is both for its own sake and job seeking; there is a nice balance at Rutgers.

Jordan

Here at Rutgers, it can be hard for a professor to know your name. Most introductory classes are lecture halls, so you may find it impossible to be recognized by aprofessor. However, once you've gotten into your major, the classes shrink and become far more intimate than those of your freshmen year. My favorite class here at Rutgers was my News Writing and Reporting class. My professor was so much, always had something interesting to say, and I always left the class feeling like I really learned something. I think students use study time as a social hour. Quite often you'll find students sitting in the student center, libraries, or lounges "studying" but socializing as well. Sometimes studying gets done, sometimes none gets done at all. Most are usually cramming but it's all a part of the fun of college life and having a jam packed schedule. Being that the population is so vast, there are so many different types of students. I don't think Rutgers carries an unintelligent population. The student body is diverse, eclectic, and well-rounded.

Kyle

The first couple years, most people just get thrown into huge introductory lecture classes that range from 75-300 people. No, the professor usually doesn't get to know your name and no, its not totally necessary to go to class. Depending on what major you're in, most courses for upperclassmen are a lot smaller, which is nice if you're actually trying to interact with your professor. Apparently, we have an awesome philosophy program here--"awesome" meaning "best in the nation." Other than that, the medical and pharmacy programs are pretty renowned but they're also turbo-competitive and they tend to, uh, suck out your soul. I've seen it happen. Those students seem to work non-stop, but other majors (like mine, journalism...pfft) can be much more laid back. There are definitely a few interesting (read: batshit insane) professors here, but it's good to mix it up a little.

Daniel

Without attending office hours there is no chance a professor will remember your name, which makes acquiring letters of recommendation a tricky task. Most classes are based on a curve which designates a certain percentage of students to receive A's down to F's, which makes classes very competitive. Of course I can only speak for the science classes. This is no community college. The chemistry department is known for having a tremendous fail rate. From my experience, the professors are extremely knowledgeable on their respective areas of study and are willing to hold office hours for students who are feeling unsure. If you are having doubts about your ability to keep pace in such a competitive atmosphere it is vital that you attend office hours weekly. It has saved my grade more than a couple times. For biology you are required to complete an internship before graduation. This turned out to be one of the greatest things I did at Rutgers since it provided me with some extra resume material.

David

Academics at Rutgers differs by major. Within my major (Journalism and Media Studies) the professors are great. Everyone knows everyone's name. The classes are interesting and you learn a lot. I have taken classes outside of my major and it just is not the same. I am not going to name names, but man, there are some bad professors out there. My favorite class I have ever taken is Science and Health Journalism. I am not a huge fan of those topics, but the professor was excellent. We didn't learn anything about science or health. We learned how to write. It just so happened science and health were the topics. The professor, Bruce Reynolds, didn't read out of a book. He didn't have reading assignments that students would forget as soon as the exam was over. He taught us about what it is like to be in a newsroom, and that is something I will use forever. He was more of a manager than a professor. Yes, he was teaching us. But if you had a question about something he didn't answer it like a professor, he answered like a boss. He told you the right way to do things, not the way the book says. The most unique class I have ever taken I am currently enrolled in. The Comic. Attendance is not mandatory, but I wouldn't miss it for anything. Every class is a laugh riot. The first assignment was to write three jokes. The professor spent the next three classes reading the jokes people wrote down. The class itself is not really a useful class, but it is one of the my favorites. In the journalism department most of the faculty and staff have worked in the field. They make classes interesting and use real world experience to help you. The professors are easily approachable and make themselves readily available to students. The internship program is second-to-none. I get emails almost everyday about available internships and landed one last semester with MSG Network in New York City.

Andrea

My professors usually know my name because I am very talkative in class. I love all of the classes I'm taking at the moment, but my favorite would be "Patterns in Civilization: Love in Japan in Europe." We read ancient love stories and write journal entries about our own love lives. It is the most unique course I've taken. I don't think class participation is as common as it could be, even though we are graded on it. In my Eagleton class, students are jumping to speak and in other classes the teacher has to call on students for them to speak up. I find that students frequently have intellectual conversations outside of class. That's the only reason why I am still in a boring internship at the Attorney General's office. My co-workers are enjoyable company.

Carson

If the class is larger than 50 people then no, probably not. Professors don't know who I am. However, if they're smaller, they have to take attendance. Supposidly. My favorite class has been Media. My least favorite has been News Reporting. It all blatantly depends on the professor. Science majors live to study. I, however, live to live. Class participation is a bigger deal in the smaller classes. We went through this already. Once, I did actually overhear two students having the most intellectual conversation ever. And I mean, ever. Sober, mind you. In the competitive fields, yes. Biology and lab and such tend to make students a little intense. I have yet to take something unique. I belong to the School of Communication. I'm a Journalism major and I'd prefer not to spend time with professors outside of class unless if that guarantees an A. I suppose I feel fine about Rutger's academic requirements strictly because of the fact that I've never examined another school's academic requirements. We focus a little more on jobs, I feel, but that also depends on the major. Philosophy majors probably care about learning a little more than Engineering majors who are bound to make money.

Andy

When you first arrive to RU as a freshman, professors most certainly do not know your name. This is because the chance of you being in a class with 400 other names is more than likely. Introduction courses are frequently held in massive lecture halls with many many other students. I personally never found this to be either a particularly good or bad thing but it does tend to discourage some students from speaking up or asking questions amongst so many peers. As classes get more specific to one's major they get much smaller, more interesting, and more engaging.

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