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Seattle University

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What are the academics like at your school?

The greatest thing about the academics at Seattle U is that the class sizes are small, so you'll usually have a class with no more than 30 students (there are rare exceptions, like science labs, but you'll usually have around 20-30 students per class), which makes it much easier to approach your professor - and classmates - for help. The teachers (for the most part) really seem to know what there doing, and even if I don't particularly like a class - or a teacher - it's all laid out there for you, so you'll know how much is expected of you and when everything is. Also, the professors are all really nice people at heart and many of them will gladly give their own time to their students. While for the most part Seattle's academics are good, there are negatives. One big one is the school's focus away from them. With a new initiative to go division one, their shifting their focus away from academics (which is how it has always been) and more towards sports, which comes with budget cuts. The department hit the hardest has been the Modern Language department, which is nearly non-existent now. As someone who wants to pursue languages as a career, there isn't much to offer academically (although there are many resources throughout the city, as it is one of the most multicultural in America), with only 2 languages being able to study for 4 years while the rest are left at only two. This is true for the rest of the academic departments: their focuses are very narrow. Another negative (but a lot of students and faculty see it as a positive) is the CORE courses you have to take. CORE courses are courses from a variety of disciplines that are supposed to make you a well rounded student. For Arts and Sciences students (which is the biggest school on campus), you will spend half of your academic career on CORE courses alone, which can really hamper students who would rather double major or focus entirely on what THEY want to student, no study what the University wants them to.

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The class sizes are small and students get to know their professors well. It's a great educational experience as they are available to help you improve your academic skills on a personal basis. Some of the teachers are great--if you meet their challenge, they will raise you to the next level in your studies. Some are not so great--check ratemyprofessor.com to see. Great teachers are available. The courses can be either easy or rigorous depending on the instructor and the course itself. Some teachers lecture, some do seminar format, and the worst leave you hanging. Once again, the school is small enough to where you can find out what to take and who to take it from by talking to fellow students. If you find the right crowd, you can explore your intellectual interests outside of class. If you find the wrong crowd, you may be stuck reading shitty poetry in yuppie cafes with psuedo-intellectuals who rebelled from the mainstream after the mainstream gave them "B"s. The psychology department is one of the most unique in the country and I'm very happy to get to be a part of it. So far, the chemistry portion of the pre-med track has not been as good as my AP high school class. Depending on your major (practical v. artsy), getting a job won't be too difficult.

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Class sizes are relatively small at SU and so it is not unusual for professors to get to know their students' names by the end of the quarter. My favorite class at Seattle U was a Renaissance philosophy and theology course that was supplemented by three weeks spent in Italy during the summer. Another favorite class was called Intro to E-commerce and Information Systems. It taught me html coding and web authoring as well as the importance of technology in the business world. Underclassmen as well as Nursing students and Engineering/Science students study more than other students. But as you get older, students often get internships and work experience so studying happens in a very different way. The education at Seattle is geared toward educating the whole person. The core classes cover a range of classes from math and science to philosophy and theology. But as a business student, I feel that my education has helped me learn how to prepare for getting a job and starting a successful career. Because Seattle U. is a Jesuit University, many of the professors are priests. So you will often see students sitting or walking with priests and talking about class over lunch.

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SU is a smaller sized school and class sizes are very intimate. This is very dependant onyour major. For example my communications major has 45 students in it. I know all of my teachers by their first name. They offer great one on one help and also stimulate great active learning among peer groups. The best thing abotu the professors at SU is often you can forge a good relationship with many of them that can help you out in the long run, for example using them as a refference or even networking. Many prof's have great professional experience and share it with students. Getting good grades at SU is really not all that hard, I felt at times like i did more work in High School. Nice thing about knowing all of your Prof's is that you can easily ask for extesions on work. Most gradign is pretty subjective from my experience and teachers have been rather generous as long as you put your best foot forward. While most of SU is focused around a well rounded education, many new majors are sprouting up which emphasize work experience and include mandatory internships to prepare grads for the work right out of school.

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The academics are great. Small class sizes makes it really easy to get to know your teacher and the teachers are always available for office hours. The classes are all themed which makes class discussions really interesting. For example, I took a writing course that was themed "Terrorism: The Balance Between Freedom and Security." This class really opened my eyes to current events and with the election right around the corner really got me involved with politics. Even though it was a writing course, I learned so much about the world and learned a lot about writing whilst writing about interesting topics. For my final paper I wrote a letter to the next President of the United States arguing why they should shut down Guantanamo Bay and through extensive research and proper argumentation, I felt like it was a valid argument. The teachers also like to spend time outside of class to see a movie or a play to experience the topic in the real world. The teachers are dedicated to educating the whole person and so they really incorporate all subjects into each class so that you're constantly being challenged, which is good.

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Seattle's biggest perk is the academics in my mind. It has the best creative writing bachelor's program that I've come across in all of my college searching and comparison. It is also rather small, which gives you a much easier time getting around it, and fosters a sense of community. You can get to know people easily because of this situation, and the small class sizes, typically less than 30 people, and usually only around 20. The professors will actually know your name and expect you to participate in classes. Participation is almost always 10% of the grade or more. With these small classes, you really can talk to people and study outside class. In the dorms you're usually grouped with other people at your class level, so you can often have class together and then work together on school, and have discussions. Some professors are more open than others to outside discussion, but in general, you can have really good relationships with professors. Granted, not every professor is alike. You won't like all of them and they won't all be friends with you. But many will.

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Seattle U is mostly about academics. The class sizes are small, so you get to know your teacher well, and they get to know you. Also, because we're so small, there is plenty of oppertunity to talk with professors about the class. In the discussion classes (theology, philosophy, english, history, etc...) there is plenty of discussion and oppertunity for discussion. The amount of homework given is usually pretty comparable to credits earned and level of class. For the 100 levels, there's about an hour for each hour of class, if not less. For 300-400 levels, it's at least 2 hours homework per one hour of class. But even if it's hard to accomplish all the homework, the teachers are usually very understanding and willing to help to get you back on track, or even a bit ahead. There are plenty of help facilities around campus, like a math center, a writing center, and tutors. I feel like at the moment I'm working to get a background in education, but also to start building a foundation for future careers.

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My first year at Seattle Unviersity and every quarter I have been asked by my parents and other students at other schools, how big are your classes? Seattle U is a small school and none of my classes have been over 32 per class. Most of my classes have been 25 to 20 students per class because there is a expectation of class participation. We are on the Quarter system, which is like running a marathon for 11 weeks. Studying is part of college, but really depends on the classes and major your in. The most unique thing about Seattle U's academics is the Core and the requirements of the Core. Every student has to take english, math, art, and philosophy. Philosophy is not a subject that many have encountered before, but it is a learning experience and whether you love it or hate it, make sure you get a very good professor because that is the key in whether you love the subject or not.

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All my professors knew my name this last year. i didn't have a favorite class this year, I was taking all core reqs or general biology or general chemistry; not much fun there. But now that I'm done with the general classes I can get onto the ones I actually want to take like Anatomy. Students study all the time and if they're not, chances are they should be. All I did freshman year was study, with a little procrastination and a little partying thrown in there. Class participation is usually required, teachers grade on it. But it's no different than high school. Some students have intellectual conversations, again same as high school. The science dept is really tough, the classes can be pretty difficult, but everybody wants to help you and see you do well. Education at Seattle U will get you a job right out of college and you will have a great deal of knowledge.

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Overall, most students are pretty intelligent and really want to be here. People study hard during the week, but still know how to have fun, especially on weekends. I think all my professors have learned my name. The largest class I've had is Econ with 35, and the smallest was improvisation with 10. That was a unique class. Since it was so small, we really bonded. We learned all kinds of improv techniques, from theatre improv to dance and "contact" improv, which involved lots of movement, so it was a good break from lecture classes. We also went to performances outside of class, and our professor came with us. My philosophy class also took a couple of optional class trips outside of class. I feel like people are smart but not cocky. Even the athletes have some of the highest GPA averages out of other area colleges.

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