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Seattle University

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What are the academics like at your school?

I don't think I've personally been in a class with more than 25 students, most of my classes average around 20. The teachers know your name and pay attention to how your doing in respect to the material. My favorite classes have been my Humanities classes. One thing I love about them is that instead of reading out of one textbook we work out of 5-8 different books (some fiction, some art, some historical non-fiction). I've heard that this is a common practice outside of the Humanities program as well. The majority of the students here love sharing what they've learned in class with other students, especially from other majors. Besides lunch-table discussions of this nature, Residence Halls and student organizations such as SEAC host discussions on everything from sexuality to current events throughout the year. Seattle University is definately a liberal arts university in that it encourages students to learn for its own sake and to gain some sort of knowledge or insight into a wide range of subjects, not just those which pertain to one's major. The University designed its core to ensure that students have this experience. Nevertheless, from what I've heard the school actively involves itself in aiding students in finding and obtaining apprenticeships, work-study positions, etc.

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One of the best things about SU is the small class size, although that's growing year by year which is unfortunate. You will most likely be familiar with every tenured professor in your department, and for the Comm dept, you'll probably take a class taught by your advisor. If you like your advisor/professors, it's a pretty sweet arrangement. Otherwise, sorry. The best class I ever took at SU was Human Rights Leadership with Therese Caouette. She is so involved in human rights issues and it really comes out in class material. Whenever possible, take classes for adjunct professors--they'll most likely be more connected to the "real world." I was in the new Strategic Communications major at SU, which was an interesting experience. The curriculum hadn't really been set so the classes I took were scattered, but the ones I have taken were really useful and beneficial. Utilize your professors when looking for a job--they have large and extremely useful networks!

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Class sizes are generally small and pretty intimate. Students however, do a lot of their intellectual discussion outside the classroom. As a Psychology student, I've been fairly pleased with the quality of the classes in my major and the importance placed on qualitative rather than quantitative study. It's also important to note that all learning on campus generally has a social justice tie to it. Since we are a university that prides itself on diversity, social justice and empowering leaders for a just and humane world, many of the conversations in the classrooms and even in the residence halls are infused with these notions. Students aren't too competitive, generally academic success is defined by the individual rather than a general standard. Professors genuinely take an interest in their students and their academic success and learning is both geared to practical job-seeking and learning for enrichment purposes.

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They are fairly challenging. We have great professors who will not only met with students to address any class issues but are also excited to talk to students about future opportunities, majors, current events and life in general. Seattle U has an amazing faculty network of support. Last Quarter I took a really interesting course on Human Rights Leadership. The professor was awesome and extremely knowledge about the greater field of development. I have also really enjoyed getting to know professors in the Social Work Department, although I have only taken one course in my major. Seattle U puts a big empathize on the Core. The educational philosophy is on the “whole person” and is a pretty good mix of liberal and professional education.

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Professors know your name most of the time and are very willing to help. This means you should probably come to class. This also means that a lot of classes grade based on class participation. You'll be taking a lot of core classes no matter what your major. You'll be in 3 years of philosophy, along with religion, sociology, english, etc. If you get good teachers you'll get a lot out of these classes. If you don't care, then you can find some really easy teachers and just get through them.

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The academics at seattleu are really great. class sizes are often small so you get more of a one on one with the professor. class participation is often required in the class but the classes are very easy to participate in. the professors are very approachable. they have office hours but will often make time to meet with you if there is a problem.

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Seattle University is a very competitive college and for my major, it is very competitive. However, there are great teachers and advisers who go beyond their duty to ensure that all students who need help are got it. Class participation is commonly encouraged and my favorite part is lab where I can put into application what I read in books.

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All the humanities classes are really interesting, Professors like Curtis and Madsen are institutions, known for a combination of shocking pop culture references and tough but fair grading. Students are not competitive, they're really helpful and laidback. Class participation varies

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Very challenging, but professors will definitely help you out if you have any questions.

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Perfect class sizes, some wonderful professors.

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