All Questions for

Texas Tech University

« See more reviews of Texas Tech University

What are the academics like at your school?

Texas Tech has a solid academic program. Just like any university unless you want to be known your professors will not know who you are. In the lower division courses the majority of my professors only knew me because I spoke up in class and stayed actively involved in various discusion. In my major courses all my professors know me by first name, last name, major and even future career goals. The professors are always willing to speak to you and get to know you on a more personal bases. There have been several times in which I randomly walk into a professors office and talk about life. They're humans and they love working wiht you. Texas Tech has an amazing career center that can help you find anything from internships in west Texas to six figure jobs in New York. Many colleges have developed their own career center so there are twice as many opportunities for students to find a good job and/or internship. Career fairs seem to be occuring every month. You will find workshops on resume writing, etiquite dinners, mock interviews, and so much more almost every week. The mock interview program at Tech is incredible. When students have an interview they can contact the Career Center and inform them of the company they will interview with and for what position. The career center will then emulate the company and perform a mock interview with the student. They will then advise the students on answers, clothing attire, expressions and so forth. College of Mass Communications is the youngest college on campus but it is the fastest growing and one of the top programs in the nation. My public relations department chair is one of the best PR practitioners in the nation today. The majority of the people in the college have real world experience and have either owned a PR firm, owned a newspaper agency, worked in some of the most complex situations. The college has four computer labs with brand new computers for students to learn and study in. Major classes can be as small as 10 students to a professor. There is incredible research occurring in the basement of the college at all times and you can always find a professor sitting around waiting to have someone to chat with. This is one of the best colleges at Tech and without a doubt the best professors in the Texas Tech University system. The only flaw of Texas Tech academics is it's lack of classes in Asian studies. They offer slim to no opportunities to study abroad in Asia. The minor: Asian Studies is lacking. There are approximately 20 classes offered in the minor but only about six classes are offered each semester. Usually of the six 3/4 are scheduled at the same time making it impossible for students to take a well rounded amount of classes. The university seems to not want to make the expansion towards bringing in more diverse courses and offer more opportunities to study abroad in Asian countries. The irony of it is that we have the Viet Nam Center which is growing to be the largest center on the Viet Nam wars in the world. We have also signed contracts with Vietnamese universities for students to attend Tech graduate schools. We give opportunities to foreigners but seem hesitate to give similar opportunities to our students. There are also some advisers who seem to forget that their jobs are to help the students receive a diverse and intellectual education. Some advisers forget that students pay their salary and they should work with the students to find the best route towards graduation and a strong academic career for the future.

was this helpful? loading... loading...

Academics at Texas Tech through my experience thus far has been very rewarding. There are many classes at Tech that have a lot of students in them which makes it hard for professors to really get to know you. But do not be mistaken by this, it is not how all classes are neither does it take away from the overall knowledge you can gain from that class. I just recently have been able to experience smaller classes at Tech where the professors do know your name and are more hands-on making it a much more enjoyable experience. My favorite and the most unique class I've taken thus far was actually one of these small classes that I was able to experience just this year. It was an English course that taught about the history of books and how they came to be the way they are today. It was nice because not only did my professor know me, but she was also very hands on in helping me develop into a better writer. When thinking about what my least favorite class I would have to choose my Biology course which was one of my larger classes. What made this course my least favorite was not only the class size itself, but also the fact that science is not my strong suit. Classes at Texas Tech are made even better because of the majority of students that are committed to doing well and studying. The commitment to success that many students have provides for intelligent conversations outside of the classroom between majors and non-majors as well as competitiveness between the two. I myself am an English major and am proud to say it because I believe the staff that Tech has provided me thus far has helped me in developing as a writer and critical thinker. Outside of the classroom like many other students I know, I love talking to my mechanical engineering friends about what's going on in their classes as well as mine and competing with them when it comes to making good grades. This makes for large amounts of in class discussions which makes for the learning experience to be that much better. Texas Tech's professors always have their doors open to any students with issues or problems ready to help. At Tech I am never afraid to contact or see my professor about any issue I might have. When thinking about the overall academic requirements of the school I would say that it is just right for any major and will lend a hand to making that student as successful as they want to be in the future. The education is both geared to not only to helping a student get a job for the future but so that the student may come out having learned something for the sake of learning.

was this helpful? loading... loading...

The core curriculum classes that everyone has to take are usually very large and done in lecture halls. It is difficult to get to know your professors because there are so many students in a single class that they don’t have enough time to get to know each student personally. In classes that are lecture style, I usually make an effort to visit my professors during their office hours because they like to see that you are taking an incentive to ask questions and it can benefit you in the end if they can associate a face with a name. However, when you get to more upper level classes, the number of students in each class gets smaller and you have some of the same professors for several classes. You really get to know them and they are more than willing to help you if you have any questions or problems in their classes. I am a senior public relations major and have noticed that most of my classes last year and this year have all been in the same 3 buildings taught by professors I’ve had before, which makes it easier for me to know what to expect from the professor. Texas Tech’s education is geared at both getting a job and learning for its own sake. There is an array of elective classes that students can take just because they are interested in the subject. Each major has some open spots that students can choose to fill with classes they’re interested in rather than classes that strictly involve their major. For example, I took a psychology class that ended up being one of the most interesting courses I’ve ever taken and it had nothing to do with public relations. There is also a very helpful career center and advisors located in each college that help students get an idea of what type of career they may be interested in pursing. I took my resume to the career center and told her a few things I want in a future career. She edited my resume so that it was perfect to send off, and started sending me e-mails every week or so of lists of companies that were hiring (both full-time positions and internships) that had some of the qualities I was looking for. Tech’s academic requirements aren’t too challenging but studying is a must, especially when you get into the upper level courses more specific to your major. The general courses that everyone has to take were not too hard and students that have already taken the class are more than happy to tell others which professors are the hardest and which are the easiest.

was this helpful? loading... loading...

I appreciate the way classes are set up at Texas Tech because, for most classes, you have the option of registering for either small, intimate classes or large lecture-style classes. This makes it possible to form your class schedule around your learning style and your academic interests. For example, I chose classes of 30 or less people for my English classes because I knew I would benefit from class discussions and having a professor who knew me personally, but chose lecture classes of 200 or more people for classes such as history and political science, where I was only interested in passing the class to fulfill my core requirements. My favorite classes at Tech have all been my American Sign Language classes. I have had three different teachers in three semesters, and every one has taken the time to get to know me as an individual rather than as just another student. I feel this has been especially beneficial because it is much easier to pick up on a foreign language when you feel comfortable with the person you are attempting to converse with. My least favorite class was probably political science. I am not a fan of politics in general, and the fact that this was a class of 250 students where the professor still insisted on a seating chart and taking attendance every day made me feel like I was attending a giant kindergarden class. Luckily, most professors I have had treat the students as competent adults interested in learning rather than small children who need to be babysat and guided step-by-step through the year. Student participation and competitiveness has definitely depended on the class. My major is communication studies with an emphasis on interpersonal communication, I am an English minor, and, were I not graduating a year early, would also be an American Sign Language minor. In the two and a half years I have been here, I have found that in core classes such as history and lower level math classes, it is clear the students are interested only in passing and moving onto classes they are more interested in. However, in all of my major/minor-specific classes the students have been very engaged, ready to learn, and come to class prepared. The professors in these classes especially take an interest in not only teaching the curriculum, but in really passing along knowledge and skills necessary for the students to succeed in their future careers.

was this helpful? loading... loading...

Like at any school, there are professors who know what they are doing and professors who do not have a clue. I have noticed that the older ones are better, because they have the experience under their belts. The professor will more likely come to know your name in a smaller class setting. That is kind of common sense. It does feel good when he/she does know your name though. It makes me feel like I'm not just a number. Especially because at orientation, freshman are given "R#'s" that is basically your identification until you graduate. So it can make one feel small, but with the genuine kindness of the professors, it's easy to feel like #1! I do believe that the professors and what they teach provoke thought for students, because no matter where I go, I hear conversations that refer to a class discussion. It's good to know that I'm not the only one that gets into the details in class and talks about them. And it's really cool knowing that college is not required, like high school is, so everyone at college wants to be there. They have a passion that they want to fulfill and learning happens to be part of that path. Plus, what's not to love about picking your own classes?! For example, I am an English major (if you couldn't tell by my special attention to grammar and whatnot). There are a couple specialties I couldn't chosen under the English major and I chose Creative Writing. In order to get my required hours under this degree, there are many many different English classes to pick from, according to my desires. That is just in English! I also have my requirements for sciences, technology, visual and performing arts, personal fitness and wellness, and history. In my opinion, some of the requirements are pointless. For instance, the electives I will have to take. After writing down my undergraduate plan for classes with all my required ones, I still lack eleven hours to fill just to meet my 120 hours degree requirement. Those eleven hours will have to be filled with electives, which are classes that just take up my time for no reason because I am technically finished with my requirements!! That's something I do not agree with. Academics are overall great. I really enjoy my classes, professors, and classmates.

was this helpful? loading... loading...

I have a few professors that know my name because I have introduced myself and attended theit office hours. My favorite class is anything in psychology or yoga, while my least favorite class was english. Core classes in english consist of contually writing papers, somtimes 4 a week. Studying is a hard subject because on average, most students study for 30 minutes to an hour. In the case of my immediate friends, we study hours at a time to achieve our high GPA's. You are who you hang around, just remember that. In class, many professors require participation and as much as that may not sound interesting, you tend to retain the information better. Some students have intellectual conversations outside of class about anything and everything. There are also many independent coffee shops that create the perfect atmosphere for these kind of conversations. I have not met many students that are ademically competitive, but sports wise, YES! I have taken Sexual Behavior psychology and that was the most unique class I have ever been in. I enjoyed the material, even though reading the material made me feel like I was doing something wrong. My major is psychology and it is the best department on campus. The undergrad advisor is wonderful and helpful. i rarely spend time with professors outside of class unless I am in their office hours. The academic requirements for Tech are usually 2.5 and although that is low for my standards, it is a attainable goal for most. I do not focus on the minimum and instead look towards getting the maximum grade possible for my imput in classes. Eductaion at Tech is geared more towards learning rather than getting a job. The getting a job aspect is near graduation when we attend career fairs, but before considering the job, we need to learn about the field of study.

was this helpful? loading... loading...

Academically, Texas Tech is what you make it. My professors certainly know my name, and I have great relations with them because I stay on top of my work and participate in class. Professors really like participation! Certainly, you may have a few Large lecture classes with 400 + students and the professor may not know your name, but in my smaller classes my teachers know me well, and if you attend class and do your assignments they will certainly know you as well. Again, it is important to organize your time and make sure you set a certain amount of time each week to study. Time spent studying varies on the amount of hours you're taking, and you as an individual. Tech does however have a large, and beautiful library as well as online databases, and private tutors should you need further assistance in any class. Honestly, Texas Tech provides all the tools and resources you need that can help you achieve academic excellence. Also, Tech considers their students even after college. For instance, Tech has a career services center which is a free and wonderful resource for finding internships and jobs both during and after your time at Texas Tech. At the career services center, students can talk to advisors who help them on a path towards a career, set up mock interviews, and also help edit their resumes to make themselves marketable. Additionally, Tech provides many job fairs throughout the year where businesses and organizations come to Tech to try and reach out to students for internships as well as jobs. Sure Tech looks good because of its high achieving students, but Texas Tech certainly doesn't do it just for looks. Texas Tech wants to graduate successful young adults so that the may represent the Red Raiders in the real world.

was this helpful? loading... loading...

On average 70% of students who apply to Texas Tech University are granted admittance. We are a very large University and provide opportunities for almost 30,000 students to receive higher education. Although the enrollment process may not be as competitive as it is at other top Universities, the academics are just as challenging and demand the best from every student, professor, and staff member. As a student majoring in English, I was lucky to have small classes with, on average, a 15:1 student to teacher ratio. Every class consisted of a teacher led discussion and since the class sizes were so small, every student had the opportunity to provide their input and actively participate. I developed a strong student teacher relationship with many of my professors and over the course of my academic career they were there to support me and celebrate my successes even though I was no longer a student in their class. Most of my professors, even those that had been teaching at the University for a substantial amount of time, were incredibly invested in their students and often allowed the curriculum to evolve to better satisfy our interests. As students, we were always their main priority and it felt great to always have someone on your side when it came to dealing with administrative issues, scheduling conflicts, or any other problems having to do with the University. My professors were able to inspire and encourage me so that even in this poor economy, I feel confident that I will be able to make my way into the professional world.

was this helpful? loading... loading...

Like I said above, professors at Tech are very likely to know your name if you take the time to actually remember theirs. By taking a couple minutes the first days of class to introduce yourself, most professors will go out of their way to remember it and remember you. My favorite class throughout college was probably Professor Brad Carlson's Marketing Promotions class or one of Dr. Till's (Tillman Wagner) classes. Dr. Till is from Germany and has a hilarious accent....not to mention his humor is hilarious, too. Students generally study a good deal at Tech and especially if it's finals. It's almost sad how much of a social scene the library is. Class participation is also pretty common. It (understandably) get even more common the older you get. You start looking at your GPA and realizing that the classes you actually attending you got A's in...and the one's you didn't...you somehow got C's. The amount of intellect through Tech's student body is also often underestimated. Alot of extremely smart people come to Tech, because their parents, siblings, or friends did or on their own accord. And because of that, there is a lot of intellectual conversation in and out of the classroom. I'm in the business school (Rawl's College of Business) and it's highly competitive. I'm not sure what the minimum GPA is to get into the college, but I know it's not very low. It also has, what I believe, to be some of the most fun, and funniest professors on campus.

was this helpful? loading... loading...

Academics at Tech are DEFINATELY on the uphill swing. Tech gets a bad rep from older parents and grandparents because they remember Tech from when it was still a relatively young school, being built decades after Texas and Texas A&M were. It takes a university time to build well known academic programs, which Tech now successfully has. The architecture school is top in the state and very difficult to be in. I know several people who changed majors because of how time consuming it was. The law school is ranked in the top 10 in the nation for what your getting and the price. The engineering school offers several great degrees, mine being in construction technology. My teachers all know my name and it is easy to meet with a teacher or find people who will help you out if you need it. They are about to break ground on a new business school which will be as nice as any in the state. My roomate came to Tech for the Exercise and Sports Science degree which has become very popular. I also know several people from back home who transfered (or tried to transfer) in from other universities for the nursing school. It's easy to find a good degree and there are plenty of options which I love about a larger school.

was this helpful? loading... loading...