Tulane University of Louisiana Top Questions

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Olivia

I absolutely love Tulane University. The atmosphere is great! There is so much to do on and off of campus. New Orleans is a wonderful city.

Ilana

I think the academics are great, and the location makes sure you never get bored.

Patrick

Awesome - i often find myself thinking i go to the best school in the country for undergrad. really its all because New Orleans is so unique.

Morgan

I absolutely love being at Tulane. I immensely enjoy being in the city of New Orleans and I feel a sense of community and belonging not only to the school but to the city as a whole. I find that Tulane is just the right size. It seems like a fairly small school, but this breeds a sense of community throughout the student body without making students feel restricted in the way they spend their time and in who they spend their time with. There is never a shortage of on campus or off campus events, and the culture in New Orleans is one that enables students to engage in a variety of activities and it ensures a unique experience for everyone willing to open themselves up to new ideas.

Jennifer

The best thing about Tulane for me is the flexibility. Teachers and administrators will work really hard to help you accomplish your goals, even if they're out of the ordinary. With about 7000 undergrads (and growing) it's a good size and most classes are pretty small, allowing you to build relationships with your professors. It's also flexible in the sense that you can be as involved on campus and school-spirited as you like or you can run around exploring the city and both are completely acceptable. I tend to spend my time off campus because New Orleans has a fantastic, youthful energy and great alternative culture. Because the student body is so varied and people are off doing their own thing, sometimes it feels apathetic. For instance there has been a movement going on campus since 2009 to get fair pay for the workers in the dining hall, but the organizers have had a really hard time getting any kind of solidarity from the students. I guess that's what I'd change about Tulane; I like the independence, but sometimes it would be nice if the student body was more cohesive.

Jessie

Tulane's biggest selling point is that its in New Orleans. New Orleans has endless opportunities for people interested in doing service learning, working at an NGO, and making a real difference. But New Orleans also offers a community culture and social life that a lot of other top schools struggle to create. New Orleans is authentic. That being said, Tulane has its issues just like anywhere else. Their job placement department is only there is you search it out (or are in the business school). You get the most out of Tulane if you put a lot it - they aren't going to hold your hand like some smaller private colleges will. And this is the reason many students fail out. No hand holding means no one to catch you when you fall behind from taking a little too much enjoyment from the local culture. The school size is big enough to allow you this space to swim but small enough that if you want extra help, if you want to be involved, you can be. New Orleans is a great college town because Loyola is right next door, Xavier down the street, and University of New Orleans a big presence as well. But, you still get the positive of having a real campus with trees and quads unlike other city colleges like Boston, where I grew up. Although I loved Boston University when I was looking at colleges, the lack of a beautiful green campus was what lost me.

Caitlin

Tulane seems to offer a place for every type of student. Whether or not you're in Greek life or interested in other activities, its possible for everyone to find their "group." New Orleans itself is hands down one of the bigger positives of going to Tulane. Not only are there numerous opportunities to get involved, but New Orleans also offers a great social scene suited to college life. Students can hear live music, eat amazing food, or just go out with their friends any day of the week; it is really incomparable to any other city in the country. One of the downsides to New Orleans is transportation, while the street car seems fun and accessible in theory, it really isn't an efficient way to get around the city. Not everyone has a car, but they are really useful for jobs,volunteering, internships, etc.By sophomore year you will pretty much recognize every person on campus- so if you're looking for a school where it is easy to remain anonymous Tulane isn't for you. Although it is on the smaller side, it is big enough where you won't have to say hello to every person you pass on the way to class. I personally find the size just right because while I do know a good amount of people, I could always branch out and make more friends. Tulane has a well respected reputation, but you will have to explain many times that we do not spend all of our time in the French Quarter. There is such a thing as the "Tulane Bubble" but it mostly applies to underclassmen who take advantage of the campus' vicinity to bars and other entertainment close by. When on campus students are normally studying in the Business School, Library, or PJs Coffee. Tulane offers a lot of perks for their student body, strangely enough it is not out of the ordinary to see a bouncy castle on one of the quads every Friday night. "Fridays on the Quad" were a great series of concerts and free foods offered during the fall semester right on campus and was a great way to start off the weekend, showing that the administration is committed to keeping the student body happy. One of the negatives to Tulane is the lack of school pride- besides homecoming venturing downtown to the Superdome for a football game is nearly unheard of. Hopefully with the new coach and possible on campus stadium, this will change in the coming years. Another issue students have is the difficulty of studying abroad. While a good portion of students are able to and do go abroad, Tulane's program has its limits and often people will have to settle for their second choice location.

Caitlin

Tulane seems to offer a place for every type of student. Whether or not you're in Greek life or interested in other activities, its possible for everyone to find their "group." New Orleans itself is hands down one of the bigger positives of going to Tulane. Not only are there numerous opportunities to get involved, but New Orleans also offers a great social scene suited to college life. Students can hear live music, eat amazing food, or just go out with their friends any day of the week; it is really incomparable to any other city in the country. One of the downsides to New Orleans is transportation, while the street car seems fun and accessible in theory, it really isn't an efficient way to get around the city. Not everyone has a car, but they are really useful for jobs,volunteering, internships, etc.By sophomore year you will pretty much recognize every person on campus- so if you're looking for a school where it is easy to remain anonymous Tulane isn't for you. Although it is on the smaller side, it is big enough where you won't have to say hello to every person you pass on the way to class. I personally find the size just right because while I do know a good amount of people, I could always branch out and make more friends. Tulane has a well respected reputation, but you will have to explain many times that we do not spend all of our time in the French Quarter. There is such a thing as the "Tulane Bubble" but it mostly applies to underclassmen who take advantage of the campus' vicinity to bars and other entertainment close by. When on campus students are normally studying in the Business School, Library, or PJs Coffee. Tulane offers a lot of perks for their student body, strangely enough it is not out of the ordinary to see a bouncy castle on one of the quads every Friday night. "Fridays on the Quad" were a great series of concerts and free foods offered during the fall semester right on campus and was a great way to start off the weekend, showing that the administration is committed to keeping the student body happy. One of the negatives to Tulane is the lack of school pride- besides homecoming venturing downtown to the Superdome for a football game is nearly unheard of. Hopefully with the new coach and possible on campus stadium, this will change in the coming years. Another issue students have is the difficulty of studying abroad. While a good portion of students are able to and do go abroad, Tulane's program has its limits and often people will have to settle for their second choice location.

Janine

Tulane University was unbeknownst to me during the never-ending process of college applications. Quite frankly, I had no idea what I was looking for. But like many of my peers I found it in New Orleans without expecting to. My first impression of the school was derived from the seemingly endless flow of mail being sent to me. What I perceived as desperateness on the part of the administration was actually the strategic way to increase the applicant pool, thus making the university more competitive each year. I did not have to write an essay to apply and the application would be free. I applied without even considering the school or taking my application seriously. Ironically, I was touring the University of Miami when my interest in Tulane was sparked. The elder sibling of a girl taking the Miami tour with me was a freshman at Tulane University. Her enthusiasm for Tulane drowned out the words of the tour guide. I realized that I had to visit. As I wandered around Tulane’s campus just a month later, I fell victim to the familiar embarrassment of being a prospective student with my parents by my side. I couldn’t help but notice that that when students gazed my way and noticed the bright green “Roll Wave” folder I was holding, instead of giving me a vapid stare they smiled. People seemed happy and it was as simple as that. I was leaving the LBC (equivalent to a student union on other campuses), when I thought I heard my name. I wasn’t sure, so I kept walking. But the shout persisted and got clearer. It was the girl from the Miami tour. She recognized me and when I turned around she gave me a hug and took a break from her studies to provide a squeal to the group tour I had just taken. She showed me her favorite study spots, and a room in every freshman dorm. Although she didn’t have to do much talking to sell me on the picture-perfect campus, she did anyway. Her pride for Tulane was undeniable. She told me everything and anything she could think of, and she introduced me to numerous friends that she ran into on campus. The students professed their “love for prospective students” as well as their pride in Tulane and I was overwhelmed by how friendly everyone seemed. Making a decision had never been so easy. When I moved in my freshman year I was pleased to find that I had no reason to be skeptical of the enthusiasm of the students I had met the previous May. The happy students do not just have an odd fetish for prospective students, they genuinely want people to know what it is like to go to Tulane and live in New Orleans. The picture-perfect day I experienced upon visiting was not such an oddity either, and the weather is often sighted as one of the best things about going to Tulane. But, let me note that when it rains, it pours. Everyone has rain boots and an investment in a pair of new Hunters will not be in vain. When people ask me where I go to school I am proud to say Tulane University in New Orleans. This regularly facilitates rich conversation about the opportunities available in such a unique city, the incredible access to music, food, and culture. It is somewhere most people like to come visit or somewhere that many people hold fond memories of. Tulane students are spoiled by the free give-aways that are often doled out on campus. Forget pizza and cookies, the administration provides generous tastes of Jambalaya, crawfish, potatoes and Snowballs, consistent with New Orleans culture. Jazz music often pervades the well-kept central quad.

Alex

Tulane is a small school. The school is growing, but compared to many schools that attract a similar type of student (University of Miami, WashU, Vanderbuilt) it is much smaller. The sports program isn't particularly great and there isn't a lot of spirit for the sports teams. Tulane's nightife is unmatched, and is definitely in one of the greatest college towns. There are a lot bars, restaurants and shopping in walking distance from the school. There are limited majors, but you are not required to apply to switch if you want to change the school your in (you don't need to apply to change into the Business School, Public health school, etc.)

Samantha

My favorite thing about this school is definitely New Orleans, which has a ton of amazing things for college students to enjoy. Everyone knows about the French Quarter and Bourbon Street, but most people don't realize that Maple Street is about one block away from campus, and is filled with bars, restaurants and shops. There are always promotions and events, and it is absolutely impossible to be bored on any given night. Uptown is an awesome place to be, and it's impossible not to fall in love with NOLA culture. There's also a thriving Greek scene, and those parties are always a lot of fun. The campus is beautiful, and the perfect size. It is big enough that you will never meet anyone in your class, but it is small enough that you will always see the people you want to see. One of the best things about Tulane is the weather, which starts out very humid but then hovers around 70 for much of the year. The professors are a mixed bag, with many being very good and others being pretty awful. However, if you use ratemyprofessor and the course evaluations that are posted online, you can avoid some of the bad ones. Students always complain about registration, but I've never actually heard of it impeding anyone's ability to graduate. Our football coach recently resigned (it's common knowledge that he was fired), and students are split on the topic of what we should do next. Some say that this is our chance to finally become a football powerhouse, while others say we should remain focused on academics. There is a lot of school pride but not usually in the context of athletics, although our baseball team is very good. Almost every student I know does community service, mostly of their own volition. We do have service learning courses, which vary between incredible and useless. It's simply luck of the draw.

Clifford

The best thing is probably the other people. Everyone seems eager to meet new faces, and every student also becomes possessed with a pervasive happiness. The things I would change are probably specific to my own experience, but if I had to generalize I would say that the administration seems to go for shiny technologies that are of questionable worth. Also, I have not personally had any problems with the science department, but I have heard from many sources that those teachers tend to delegate far too much to inexperienced teaching assistants. Most people react favorably when I tell them Tulane, or at least they seem aware that it is located in New Orleans, and then they respond positively to the city. There is certainly an uptown Tulane bubble, but downtown is always only a direct streetcar ride away. School pride has increased recently as the basketball team has become the success of our sports program. Controversy arose a couple years ago as to the status of workers in the cafeteria and in other buildings, and took the form of protest-minded students siding with the workers against Sodexo, the company which employs all of the workers. The most frequent student complaints are probably against the quality of food in the dining hall, but as a senior who has had to cook for himself, those students are perhaps in for a surprise when their meals become self-cooked.

Lily

I know that Tulane is the perfect school for me, and I couldn't have picked a better place for undergrad. You get a great education but you have the opportunity to participate in a ton of extracurriculars, as well as get part-time jobs or internships through the university. Oh yeah, and your studies definitely don't interfere with your social life. People tend to look down on Tulane, especially my peers who went to schools in the Northeast. If you want the experience of living and working and one of the greatest cities in the world, New Orleans, Tulane is the perfect choice. One of the major problems with Tulane is also the subject of recent controversy. Clearly New Orleans has a lot of crime, especially post-Katrina, and the area around the university is not the safest. Tulane sends out emails to their students when crimes occur, and these emails are sent as frequently as a couple of times a week. Tulane has a shuttle service known as Safe Ride which picks up students between 8 pm and 6 am if they feel they are in danger, or if they don't want to walk home alone. The service has gotten a lot better in recent months following a major controversy after students were robbed at gunpoint while waiting for Safe Ride. However, Safe Ride's not ideal, nor are most of the other means of public transportation around the university. You may think it's great that you go to school right by the St. Charles Streetcar, but it's the most impractical way to get somewhere fast. It's fine for sightseeing, but if you are going to work or even a concert, you don't want to wait 45 minutes for the rickety, slow trolley to pick you up. The cabs are also terrible in this city. They arrive late, don't come, and pick you up drunk. They best way to stay safe and get around in New Orleans is to get a car, or find someone who has a car to chauffeur you around.

Paige

I think the title says it all...I love my school! The combination of New Orleans, social life, new friends, campus, and academic opportunities really make Tulane unique. I was nervous traveling so far away from home, at least a 5 hour flight, and only knowing one person from home at school. But I easily made friends and immediately felt comfortable in the city. I really enjoy New Orleans and try to take advantage of all the things it offers to me. No school is like Tulane. One night you can be at a frat party, the next at a jazz festival, the next taking the street car to a local Creole restaurant, and lastly watching a parade down the street and grabbing a drink at a bar. Unbelievable. The freedom New Orleans offers is addicting and I hope I never leave.

Zoe

Tulane University has exceeded all my expectations about the college experience. It is one of the most welcoming, spirited and exciting environments a college student could wish for, and I feel so lucky to be a part of it. Going off to college can be a scary or anxious time in a young person’s life, but Tulane’s student population and faculty make it feel like a home away from home. The feeling you get just stepping onto Tulane’s campus is one of warmth and happiness, and it is clear that everyone feels that way. There are always events happening on the quad or in the student center that aim to unify the students as well as the faculty, and are very successful in doing so. The professors are awesome and really take the time to help their students both in and out of class. New Orleans is such an amazing place to live; the rich culture of the city provides an opportunity to absorb knowledge supplementary to our studies and participate in new, fun activities. Community service is a very important part of Tulane’s philosophy and instills in its student a sense of responsibility and desire to help others. The city plays a huge role in the diversity of the student population and is one of Tulane’s defining qualities. I could go on and on about how much I love Tulane University, but there is really no way to put into words how incredibly rewarding attending Tulane is. The best way I can put it is that I feel so fortunate to be at a school where I am truly happy to wake up for class every day, and have made friends and memories that will last a lifetime.

Zoe

Tulane University has exceeded all my expectations about the college experience. It is one of the most welcoming, spirited and exciting environments a college student could wish for, and I feel so lucky to be a part of it. Going off to college can be a scary or anxious time in a young person’s life, but Tulane’s student population and faculty make it feel like a home away from home. The feeling you get just stepping onto Tulane’s campus is one of warmth and happiness, and it is clear that everyone feels that way. There are always events happening on the quad or in the student center that aim to unify the students as well as the faculty, and are very successful in doing so. The professors are awesome and really take the time to help their students both in and out of class. New Orleans is such an amazing place to live; the rich culture of the city provides an opportunity to absorb knowledge supplementary to our studies and participate in new, fun activities. Community service is a very important part of Tulane’s philosophy and instills in its student a sense of responsibility and desire to help others. The city plays a huge role in the diversity of the student population and is one of Tulane’s defining qualities. I could go on and on about how much I love Tulane University, but there is really no way to put into words how incredibly rewarding attending Tulane is. The best way I can put it is that I feel so fortunate to be at a school where I am truly happy to wake up for class every day, and have made friends and memories that will last a lifetime.

Zoe

Tulane University has exceeded all my expectations about the college experience. It is one of the most welcoming, spirited and exciting environments a college student could wish for, and I feel so lucky to be a part of it. Going off to college can be a scary or anxious time in a young person’s life, but Tulane’s student population and faculty make it feel like a home away from home. The feeling you get just stepping onto Tulane’s campus is one of warmth and happiness, and it is clear that everyone feels that way. There are always events happening on the quad or in the student center that aim to unify the students as well as the faculty, and are very successful in doing so. The professors are awesome and really take the time to help their students both in and out of class. New Orleans is such an amazing place to live; the rich culture of the city provides an opportunity to absorb knowledge supplementary to our studies and participate in new, fun activities. Community service is a very important part of Tulane’s philosophy and instills in its student a sense of responsibility and desire to help others. The city plays a huge role in the diversity of the student population and is one of Tulane’s defining qualities. I could go on and on about how much I love Tulane University, but there is really no way to put into words how incredibly rewarding attending Tulane is. The best way I can put it is that I feel so fortunate to be at a school where I am truly happy to wake up for class every day, and have made friends and memories that will last a lifetime.

Marianna

If I could change one thing it would be the visibility/number of sororities and fraternities on campus, and sadly the school is trying to add more. That being said, the beauty of Tulane is that one does not need to be involved in Greek Life to have a social life. The energy of New Orleans can be enjoyed by everyone, and because the bars are open to all not being a member of Greek Life has never hurt me socially. In fact, there are ways to benefit from Greek life while not being involved. (More Greeks=More free booze/parties)

Marianna

If I could change one thing it would be the visibility/number of sororities and fraternities on campus, and sadly the school is trying to add more. That being said, the beauty of Tulane is that one does not need to be involved in Greek Life to have a social life. The energy of New Orleans can be enjoyed by everyone, and because the bars are open to all not being a member of Greek Life has never hurt me socially. In fact, there are ways to benefit from Greek life while not being involved. (More Greeks=More free booze/parties)

Michael

To be completely honest, I am disappointed with my time at Tulane, and almost all of that disappointment arises from the university's administration or policies. The administration presents a facade of a university dedicated to public service and rigorous academics. In doing so, they attract some really creative and intelligent students, but then are unable to follow through on their promises. Students tend to just brush off their poor classes and grow generally apathetic when they find things aren't at all what expected. Also, as far as bureaucracy is concerned, there are absurd amounts of hoops to jump through as far as the simplest tasks are concerned, like registering for classes, studying abroad, or paying your bills. Tulane is behind other schools in many of the simple administrative aspects, including technology, food services, and general organization, but most things get shrugged off using Katrina as an excuse. It's a bit sad, but because the students are fairly cheerful, optimistic kids, you get this phrase a lot with a shrug, "Yea, sure I don't like Tulane, but I love New Orleans." That sentiment seems to be accepted as a sad underlying truth, even with professors, but people just make the most of it with the incredible surroundings and good social life. Students in general are happy, but very little of that has anything to do with Tulane. Things are definitely improving, but at a New Orleans pace. Best thing about the school: it's in New Orleans. Worst thing about the school: the administration. Somewhere in the middle and a bit spotty: academics. Random good thing most applicants should know: they give great financial aid. Random bad thing about the school most applicants should know: student safety at night is a huge issue, with armed robberies and sexual assaults relatively common just off campus.

Michael

To be completely honest, I am disappointed with my time at Tulane, and almost all of that disappointment arises from the university's administration or policies. The administration presents a facade of a university dedicated to public service and rigorous academics. In doing so, they attract some really creative and intelligent students, but then are unable to follow through on their promises. Students tend to just brush off their poor classes and grow generally apathetic when they find things aren't at all what expected. Also, as far as bureaucracy is concerned, there are absurd amounts of hoops to jump through as far as the simplest tasks are concerned, like registering for classes, studying abroad, or paying your bills. Tulane is behind other schools in many of the simple administrative aspects, including technology, food services, and general organization, but most things get shrugged off using Katrina as an excuse. It's a bit sad, but because the students are fairly cheerful, optimistic kids, you get this phrase a lot with a shrug, "Yea, sure I don't like Tulane, but I love New Orleans." That sentiment seems to be accepted as a sad underlying truth, even with professors, but people just make the most of it with the incredible surroundings and good social life. Students in general are happy, but very little of that has anything to do with Tulane. Things are definitely improving, but at a New Orleans pace.

Vivien

Generally, Tulane students are regarded as being party animals who are either native to Louisiana or from the Northeast. Tulane is also considered to have an ethnically diverse student body which a lot of school spirit and affinity for greek life. Additionally, being in New Orleans, students are considered to be humanitarians looking to rebuild the city post-Katrina. Partying is definitely a huge aspect of life at Tulane and in New Orleans! Most of the bars only require an ID of 18+ to enter. This allows freshmen and sophomores a wide range of places to go including The Boot, a bar so close to campus, most students pass it on their way between classes. While nights in New Orleans are filled with infinite numbers of things to do, places to eat and even more places to drink, the students are all miraculously motivated. Lectures are taken seriously and upper classmen in particular mature into thoughtful, intellectual young adults. Underclassmen are another story. Greek life consumes about a third of the incoming freshmen. Within a year or two, many have dropped their sororities and fraternities. We have kids from all over (my class oddly has no one from Vermont) though I would say it seems most students are from Louisiana, Texas, New York, Connecticut, New Jersey, or California. If I had to guess, I'd say 85% of the student body is Caucasian. Community service is a big part of who the students are. We are required to do 2 classes while enrolled that are community service oriented. I had expected to be given a hammer and some nails and literally rebuild homes and schools that had been destroyed or damaged by the hurricane. In reality, most TU students are assigned to tutor students from local schools or lead debate teams for schools in the New Orleans area. Students looking for a real feeling of satisfaction should seek out Habitat for Humanity or any of the numerous programs readily available and eager for help in NOLA.

Rebecca

I think the best thing about Tulane is the opportunity to live in New Orleans, and every student should take advantage of that. New Orleans gets a national reputation as a party city, and there is no denying that part of it, but it's a city with so many great other opportunities too. Tulane Uptown Campus is situated right across from Audubon Park and right on St. Charles Ave. It's an incredibly beautiful and historical part of town. My favorite thing to do freshman year was walk or bike through the park with a friend to get groceries (there is a Whole Foods on the other side) and then stop and have a picnic by one of the many ponds on the way back. Tulane's campus is beautiful, but spending the $1.25 to take a streetcar ride down town, see the antique shops, street artists, and to of course grab some beignets (donut type things) and coffee is probably my favorite thing about this school. In terms of some of the more practical things, the campus is great, very beautiful and everything is easy to get to. One of the major complaints from students is the food, we have a nice area near the bookstore with some good options and two coffee shops, but the cafeteria tends to be pretty bad. But, even with some of the usual complaints, the administration isn't always on top of everything, trying to do unique projects requires lots of paper works, I find that students are usually glad about the choice to come here. My friends and I often talk about how glad we are that we have this great experience while many of our friends at home are talking about going to parties in dorm rooms for Halloween and we went to Frenchman St., which was packed with costumed people for almost a mile. And, when I tell my family or family friends I go to Tulane, they are always interested and proud, citing what a good school it is and in such an interesting town. I think Tulane is a great place, it's wonderful in terms of size because every time I walk to class I see at least a few people I know which is always nice. But I also see a lot of people I don't know, and its fun to have the opportunity to always meet new people.

Chelsea

Tulane University is a great college for business, pre-med and public health, but unfortunately, not so much for liberal arts. While a lot of liberal arts professors are great and the classes offered are interesting, the facilities for business students, for example, far surpass those for liberal arts majors. The campus is fairly nice and the library is decent. The food on campus is pretty awful, and it's really a shame that there is an obligatory meal plan for the first two years when you're in New Orleans. New Orleans is a great city to go to college in. The bars are great and fairly cheap, as is a lot of food. There is always something to do. If you are looking for a university that rallies around its sports teams, Tulane is not the school. I myself, have never been to a single sporting event. Word is that a football stadium is going to be built on campus--we have our games in the Superdome currently--so this may change. The best experience I have gotten from Tulane is being a DJ and staff member of our radio station, WTUL. We broadcast over an FM frequency throughout the city and the audience and DJs are not just limited to Tulane students. WTUL has introduced me to a lot of great music and interesting people.

Michael

The best thing about this school is the different types of people that attend Tulane. Everyday you might meet someone from your hometown, from another state, or from another country. Tulane is the most geographically diverse school in the US. In regards to size, I think Tulane is perfect both in student body population and in geographic size. Half of my classes have 10-15 students in them. The other half that have about 60 students get broken down into groups of 10-15 per professor. People are genuinely impressed when I tell them I attend Tulane. It's academic programs are respected and recognized nation wide. Like architecture students at any school, I spend the majority of my time in the studio working on projects. However, non architecture students spend lots of time in the library; I think Tulane students are big on putting academics at the top of their priorities, but also find plenty of time to have fun downtown, seeing jazz bands, and giving back to the community. New Orleans is a great college town. There is always somewhere to go and something to do. The school can be somewhat separated from the city at times, but generally students really make an effort to make it off campus to go to concerts, bars, restaurants, or to help out around the city through community service. I have no complaints about the administration at Tulane. Any problem that I've ran into be it scheduling classes or advising issues has been resolved. There are certainly times where you will need put forth a good amount of effort to resolve things, but that's life. The staff here cares, and does everything within their power to help you plan out and execute your academic path. For a university that's not so focused on athletics, I think there is a lot of school pride at Tulane. People are proud to say they go here.

Anne

Its a great size, for starters: it's big enough to be a medium-sized college, but it's also not too big like state schools. People love coming to Tulane because it's a great school in a great city sure and there's Mardi Gras, but there are also a lot of unexpected perks: wearing flip-flops and shorts in November, festivals every week-end within 10-20 mins like the strawberry festival, the Jazz festival or the po-boy festival, amazing music everywhere, really friendly people (really), and so much more. There are lots of opportunities for students to get involved around the city, be it interning for a non-profit to save the Gulf of Mexico, working at a PR firm, or interning at a public health clinic that still deals with the aftermaths of Hurricane Katrina. The city loves Tulane and Tulane loves the city. Because we are a top-tier school in a metropolitan city, we always have important people passing through, and being students, we always get in for free or at a steep discount.

Sonya

Tulane offers every student a veritable cornucopia of activities. I manage a radio station here and I love it. There's very strong student organizations for ANY hobby. I mean ANY hobby. Student-faculty ratio is low, the campus is beautiful and safe, the city of New Orleans is amazing..I would not go anywhere else if I could decide again.

Jessica

When I was looking for the right college for me, I was extremely picky. I knew I wanted to be in a city, but still needed a campus. Not only is Tulane in an amazing city, it has a beautiful campus atmosphere. Tulane has been everything I hoped for in a school. I am able to take classes outside of my major, including dance and art. Through the school's community service requirements, I have found a passion for the arts, entertainment, and festivals, which I once interned for and now get paid to work for. The city is easy to maneuver, when one wants to get off campus and out of the college bubble. It is easy to get along with and interact with the locals as well. Tulane and New Orleans have a southern charm while still having a big city mentality.

Nina

I honestly can say that choosing Tulane was the best decision I ever made. I believe the size of the student body is perfect. You will always be meeting new people, while almost always seeing someone you know around campus. Tulane's location is also ideal. In my opinion, New Orleans is one of the best cities in the United States. The city has so much to offer and there is always something to do, whether that be a festival, parade, or just visiting parts of the city. I'd also have to say that Mardi Gras is a big plus, however many people overestimate how family-oriented it really is. It's an extremely fun week filled with festivals, despite many people's misconceptions that it is revolved around Bourbon Street.

Gabriella

Tulane is a wonderful learning environment. The classes are really interesting and the professors actually care about students doing well. Students have access to invaluable resources like the tutoring center and writing center, which helps students stay on board with classes. Professors are accessible and the majority will meet with you outside of class if you ever get confused. New Orleans is an amazing city and students will never be board. The only down side is that Tulane is uptown and students really don't spend a lot of time downtime given potential safety hazards in downtown New Orleans. Tulane offers amazing extra curricular programs and clubs but its the responsibility of the student to get involved and take advantage of all the resources. Students have the opportunity to network with alumni and set up connections that will last once they graduate. The student body is not very diverse but there is a group of people for everyone. I have not seen any cat fights of ill natured girls, but that could just be me. The sky is the limit at Tulane and I can't imagine a better place to spend college. Students understand the balance of party hard and work hard which makes Tulane the perfect combination.

Hunter

I was attracted to Tulane because it has a beautiful campus and maintains its appearance meticulously. And of course, The culture of New Orleans really CANNOT be beat, it is so wonderful and different and authentic. Mardi Gras of course is amazing, but so is just an afternoon stroll in the French Quarter--the culture really is everywhere all the time and I think Tulane does a good job at TRYING to incorporate that aspect of the city. That said, I'm not sure the students really reflect the spirit of New Orleans. Many are from wealthy suburbs of big cities and see the culture of New Orleans as an excuse to get EFFED up 6 nights a week. Tulane's administration, I think like most Universities, does have its fair share of red tape. That said, they do make an effort to make administration accessible. The advising department (at least for undeclared majors) is chaotic and not very helpful.

Samantha

The best thing about Tulane is definitley being in New Orleans and the nightlife associated with that. There is always something going on! One thing I would change is the quality of the food in the dining hall. Tulane is just the right size: big enough that you are always meeting new people but small enough that you recieve a personal education and can always find people you know when you go out. A lot of people have heard of Tulane and associate it with New Orleans. People know its a good school but that students party a lot. On campus I spend a lot of time in the common room of my dorm, in the dining hall and on the various quads around campus (sunbathing happens pretty much year round). Tulane is in uptown and there are a lot of bars and restaurants in the area that cater to college students but we are in a city so the idea of a town that revolves around the University is not really there. New Orleans has an amazing culture to explore. There is a lot of school pride but it is shown differently. Tulanians are proud to go to Tulane but we don't really show our pride through our sports teams (they aren't that great). Mardi Gras is an amazing experience that one doesn't find at most schools: it is a week of parades, beads, partying from the morning into the night in ridiculous outfits. I will always remember the night the Saints won the superbowl, the celebration was incredible and everyone was so exicited it was a once in a lifetime opportunity!

Paul

This is a school going through some really incredible changes at the moment - it is the perfect time to become a part of it! Tulane will become the first university to have a required community service component for EVERY degree conferred. The very thought of the school is often swept away by its host city, which is one of the most incredible communities in the world, and it is panning out to be a major player in the recovery process. As the largest employer in NOLA, it is an integral part of the city. Whereas the school used to have a reputation as a fantastic school with an obnoxious student body, that is no longer the case. Tulane students can expect to become part of something much bigger than themselves. Top-notch academics and the opportunity to live and learn in a city (and a country) that is in transition.

Dan

The biggest recent controversy on campus involved a fraternity (Phi Kappa Alpha or better known as Pike), and the hazing on its freshman pledges. Some of the elder fraternity members poured scalding water mixed with other liquids onto the pledges bodies, and some of them in areas one definitely would not want scalding liquids poured. Some pledges went to the hospital and were treated for second and third degree burns. The frat has lost its charter at Tulane and has been banned from the greek system. Several of the older frat members went to trial to hear their punishment.

Cameron

Tulane is the perfect school in a fabulous city. While the student body isn't so tiny that you know all 200 of your classmates, it is small enough that you will recognize names and faces, especially those that have fairly active social lives. Everyone at Tulane falls in love with New Orleans for its food, music, and amazing atmosphere (the nightlife is a plus, too). Tulane kids love to complain about the administration and the problems at Tulane, while wearing their "I Love Tulane" shirts proudly. School spirit for athletics might be missing, but you can't argue that Tulanians love their school and their adoptive city.

Steven

Tulane is the perfect size in my opinion. It's not a small school, but it's definitely not overpopulated. I think that the campus is the biggest plus about Tulane because everything is easy to get to. New Orleans is a very unique college town, because it's a very culturally rich city. Other cities offer up more opportunities, but New Orleans offers more intimate opportunities because it's a city known for only a couple things. It's a city that can be fun to live in for four years, but not much longer than that. When I tell an old person that I go to Tulane, they always talk about how great of a school it is. I had this one job interview and when I told the interviewee, she talked for 10 minutes about how Tulane is a name that is mentioned up there with Brown, Cornell, Northwestern, etc. I'm not even kidding about that. It definitely made me feel a lot smarter. When I tell other college students that I go to Tulane, a lot of them ask me to repeat the name. No one really knows where Tulane is or how good of a school it is. I would say that if I could change anything about Tulane, I would change the diversity of the student body. Tulane is SOOOOO freakin' white. And it kinda sickens me because there are a lot of racist kids. I feel like every student is the same kid with a different name. The one thing that I hate about Tulane is the administration. I feel like this is a very poorly run school. When I went to visit my sister at her school (Johns Hopkins), the first thing I noticed was how smooth everything was. I really liked how the administration at JHU was very involved with the student body. The problem at Tulane is that the administration doesn't do enough to get involved with students. Ever since my move in day commencement, I never saw Scott Cowen again. I've also never even heard of any of the other people on the administration. If Tulane wants to improve as a school, the people running the school have to do a better job to really understand students. I'll probably look bad for saying this, but I'm so incredibly sick of Tulane using Hurricane Katrina as an excuse for everything. I know that it definitely made a negative impact on Tulane, but three years later the school is still saying that's the reason for why Tulane is slipping. I think that if the school were run better, it wouldn't have to be an excuse for everything. I don't think there is a lot of school pride at Tulane, mainly because it's a school with shitty sports and a lack of real academic prestige. I think that Tulane is a good school, but it really doesn't have a great reputation anymore. I really don't feel proud of being a Tulane student. I heard that back in the day, Tulane was highly regarded as one of the top 30 universities in the U.S. Now, it's a school people don't even know about and it's just barely hanging onto a top 50 ranking on USNews.com. I know that USnews is just a ranking that doesn't really mean anything, but as much as you try not to pay attention to it, every college students looks at those rankings. It's extremely superficial, but it's something that you can't ignore. I think the greek life takes over at Tulane. I would say that the most common conversation topics is about the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity. Girls love them and guys hate them. Girls want to be rufied by them and guys just want to slit their throats. If i ever hear a girl say she wants to get rufied by another Pika brother, I'm just gonna throw the girl up for prostitution.

Alex

When I tell people I go to Tulane University, the first question all of them ask is, "How is New Orleans since Katrina?" Well, it's not perfect, but the city and the school are trying very hard to return from the destruction of the storm. Uptown, around the campus, and downtown, around the French Quarter and more tourist populated areas, are doing well. The return of the streetcar really helped students be able to branch out and explore the city because most students don't have cars. East New Orleans and the Ninth Ward are basically still ghost towns, but the people that live around those areas are still trying to rebuild their homes, if they returned to New Orleans at all. It is one of the draws to the Tulane, as well as the other universities in New Orleans, that students have many opportunities to help with the volunteer and rebuilding efforts that take place in New Orleans quite often through organizations like Habitat for Humanity, and the campus volunteer organization, CACTUS. The administration is not very efficient, no matter what they tell prospective students, and incoming freshmen and their parents. There is little to no interdepartmental communication, making it often difficult for students with more than one major to get in touch with all of their advisors. The administration gives students the run-around, making getting things done in an easy, timely manner really difficult. I often hear students complain about the administration's lack of interest in their opinions; they don't pay attention to what students want, and it sometimes seems that once they have a student's tuition money, they don't care at all about what happens to them. There's a decent amount of school pride, but the student body doesn't exude it where sports are concerned, except baseball, because our team is good. It is also time-consuming to get to football games because they are held a bus ride away at the Super Dome, making students less motivated to go than if they were held in an on-campus arena. However, students and alumni are proud to say they attended Tulane University. Some frequent student complaints that I've heard have to do with housing. All students are supposed to be guaranteed housing, but they are required to live on campus their freshman an sophomore years. I heard a lot of complaining from Junior and Senior students whose scholarships paid for their housing only if they lived on campus because there was no room for them in either of the junior and senior dorms because rising sophomores had taken their rooms because there were so many of them. In addition, renting a place off of campus is expensive and often above a student's budget. The incoming 2008 freshman class is one of the biggest classes in the school's history, so it would appear that housing is just going to become a continual problem.

Katie

The Tulane bubble has been commented on. It does exist and Freshman can have a hard time getting out of it because they aren't allowed cars their first year. The trolley works, so do the cabs. The bubble can be popped, its just takes a 5 min ride and $1.25. It isn't so much school pride as it is city pride. I don't go to Tulane University, I go to Tulane University in New Orleans. You will fall in love with this city, its people, and its history - there is no other like it. When I tell people I go to Tulane, they tend to nod and smile. Some are daring enough to ask if the city is still underwater, my answer never changes, "If it is, at least I can swim." Don't worry living under sea level can have it's own disadvantages - bring some rain boots. Tulane is climbing up the college ranks. The administration is noticing this and making efforts to keep us climbing. We don't always agree, but in the end their decisions seem to work out in our favor. Crawfest happens each April. Some gigantic number of pounds of crawfish are provided free of charge to any and all who come. A great time, one of the best weekends in spring semester.

Kate

The best thing about Tulane is the opportunity to foster and remain very social with other students and that is facilitated by the uniqueness of New Orleans as well as the student body. Students are able to strike a balance by going out and having fun as well as staying in and studying.

Alex

Tulane is a great school, well, unless you're involved. My first year at tulane (I am a transferred student) was not so great. I was not involved nor did I live on campus, so I didn't know anything that was going on. After a semester at Tulane, I realized that there were various groups and events that could help me to get more involved in. There are so many opportunities at Tulane for their students to meet other students from other parts of the world. Another thing that I have noticed about the students at my school is that they have a lot of pride!!! Everyone walks around with green and white on!

Jesse

tulane is in probably the most fun city in the country because of the leinent laws. new orleans is the best place to go to college because walking around with a beer outside is legal, bars dont close, etc.

Julie

- good mid-size school, not to large or too small - Tulane has a good name and a large alumni base, particularly in the south - it's located in Uptown New Orleans - a residential area of the city, meaning we have a campus but are also pretty close to downtown NOLA - it's a nice middle ground - there is a lot of school pride, but not very much is centered around sports - the last biggest controversies were the closing of the engineering school and Newcomb College after Katrina - Tulane is a great school located in the most unique city in America! :)

Al

Many have next to no school pride, many ask "What has the school done to make me have Pride in the school???" Things could get better in many ways just by having people that know how to think in more than one way. There can be many ways to get things done, However, looking at only one thing or one way should not be happening.. That to me is like talking with someone that knows nothing or next to nothing about a topic you need to know about in as many ways as you find be it good, bad or whatever.. The lack of will to inprove and doing as much as could be done to inprove things on a daily base. Many things that are told to people about the school is questionable and misleading from what I have seen. They would say things would be done at a set time and it would not happen at that time. Many say "WHY should I trust that information??" along with " Ya, RIGHT!! when I see it!!"

Bart

In terms of the student body, although many kids are ridiculously smart and rich, everyone is laid back and there is little competition. Everyone knows how to have a good time and gets along well. People do not compete academically. People get their shit done well, and then go out and have a great time.

Jill

THE best city to go to college in hands down. i came home from school winter break my freshman year and while al my highschool friends were unsettled and homesick i couldn't WAIT to get back to new orleans. there is so much to do and see and it is the perfect place to be a young adult. i recommend doing your best to branch out of the tulane scene as well, go to the festivals, maybe a LSU game in baton rouge, eat at the restaurants, this city is amazing and never stops!!

Rachel

The best thing about Tulane is its location. It has a campus but is located in the best city in the world, in the nicest neighborhood of the city. Plus, surrounding Tulane in the Broadway area, students dominate. Broadway is amazing and is such a fun social scene...so I would call it a mini-college town. I will always remember taking a picture on the Tulane sign with 21 friends on the afternoon of our graduation. All our families were there and a photographer who worked for Tulane happened to walk by and took so many professional photographs for us. It was awesome. She even put one on the Tulane website!

Madison

Excellent reputation in and outside of New Orleans. Students have a great relationship with the citizens of New Orleans.

Emmerson

Tulane is a great institution to attend, but like all universities, there are flaws. One of the biggest problems Tulane faces is their disorganization. The Unified graduation ceremony was long, disastrous, and boring. It wasn't structured and most students were not aware of how things would flow. Service at Tulane is slow and the workers in the LBC don't care to speed things up.

Stephanie

Tulane is the perfect size university! All professors are extremely accessible via email or office visit. My personal class sizes have ranged from 8 students to 100 students. I love Tulane and wouldn't change a thing! New Orleans is a very diverse city and attracts an eccletic bunch of intellectuals.

Sarah

Tulane's size is ideal for me, you don't know everyone on campus, which is refreshing, but you can walk across campus and see a few people you know or have seen before. There is very little that I would change about Tulane, except maybe the on-campus food, but this obstacle is easily overcome because the school is in the middle of a culinary capital of the world, its easy to find good food in New Orleans. Tulane has a very good academic reputation, and is recognized around the country. Basically, New Orleans is the greatest city in the world, and anyone who goes down to Tulane soon feels this way too. In my mind, its the best possible place to go to school.