Smithfield, RI
Bryant University


80 Ratings

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Recent Reviews

Jenifer
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

If I could go back in time nad prepare myself for the challenging academics at Bryant University I would. I would warn myself...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

If I could go back in time nad prepare myself for the challenging academics at Bryant University I would. I would warn myself to keep in mind the amount of work heading my way and to brace myself because it is completely different than my experience in high school. I would also tell myself to be more open and and to let my guard down. For the first semester of my freshman year it was diffcult for me to make friends because the transition and the workload overhwlmed me. I stayedto myself and didn't make much friends at all. I would tell myself to let go a bit and to allow myself to balance both a social life and an academic life. Lastly, I would tell myself to save up money for books because they are very expensive. It has alwas been difficult for me at the beginning of each semester because the books are expensive and my financial aid usually does not cover all of the tuition. Saving money through out the year helps me save for the tuition that my aid does not cover and also for the books I need. I just hope I listened!

What's unique about your campus?

The professors are engaging and truly want you to get the best from their lectures.

What do you consider the worst thing about your school? Why?

Some professors truly do not know what they are doing and it does not help the student learn more.

Makena
What is your overall opinion of this school?

Having been homeschooled K-12 and traveled my entire life, it took me a while to adjust to the Bryant “culture,” but as a sen...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Having been homeschooled K-12 and traveled my entire life, it took me a while to adjust to the Bryant “culture,” but as a senior looking back over the past four years, I can honestly say that in my experience the good has far outweighed the challenges. Some things I’ve always loved about Bryant include: the incredibly dedicated & supportive faculty/staff, the gorgeous campus, and the world-class International Business program, to name just a few. There are drawbacks to being a small, residential school – it can feel a little high school-ish and it’s easy to get cabin fever, for example – but all in all, I think it’s an important part of the Bryant experience (by senior year you feel like you know everyone; the sense of community is great). And despite the fact that Smithfield is sort of in the middle of nowhere, it is really easy to get to all of the major cities in the Northeast with public transportation (Providence is 20 minutes away from campus, Boston is 45 minutes away, and NYC is about 3-4 hours away), which is helpful when you need a change of scenery. I’d say that Bryant is fairly well-known in New England, but unless they know someone who went here, no one’s ever heard of it outside of the Northeast (I can’t count the number of times my friends have said, “Oh yeah, you go to school in New York, right?”). That being said, the school’s reputation and recognition is improving all the time, as is school pride. I recently heard and alumnus remark that when he first graduated from Bryant (10-15 years ago), he would mumble when anyone asked him where he went to school, but today he says it loud and proud. That statement really sums up the positive changes the school has made, and continues to make all the time.

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

As a senior looking back over my four years at Bryant, I have to say that - although the college experience has its ups and downs - I have been truly happy with my experience and education overall. I've made life-long friends, learned so many valuable lessons (both inside and outside the classroom), gotten involved in clubs/orgs/interests I would have imagined I would (before coming here), learned a new language, lived/worked/studied in several foreign countries, and so much more. It's difficult to sum up four years in just a few sentences, but I will say that Bryant has been a home to me, and it has provided the opportunities for me to do everything I just mentioned (and more). As is the nature of college - and life in general - it was up to me to reach out and embrace those opportunities. But as someone who was determined to make the most of my four-year undergraduate experience, no matter where I went, I feel truly blessed to have been at Bryant.

What's the Greek scene like?

Bryant has 8 or 10 frats & sororities total, and around 11% of the student body is active in Greek Life. Although only a small percentage of students participate, Greek Life has a very visible presence on campus. Members wear their fraternity/sorority attire proudly and often, and Greek Life hosts a number of events on campus, mostly with the aim of either recruitment or community service. As is true at most schools, the Greeks are known to throw a raging party or two, but they are also very involved in all aspects of campus life, which helps to offset the general stereotypes most people have about Greek life. Also, Bryant does not have Greek-designated housing. Members of the same fraternity or sorority may choose to live in the same suite (during sophomore and junior year) or townhouse (senior year), but since only 5-7 people live in a typical suite/house, Greeks end up living next door to non-Greeks, and most frats and sororities are spread out over several halls and houses. In my opinion, this rule is beneficial to Greek life on campus because it ensures that they have to mingle with other students and can't be completely sectioned off into their own groups/cliques.

What are some hot-button issues on campus?

Different issues take the forefront at different times, but I can't really think of any that I would call "hot-button" issues at the moment. Some common concerns expressed by the student body include: wanting better recycling/sustainability initiatives on campus, wanting better food options and quality, and wanting improvements to our student center. Other than that, there are a number of awareness weeks/months to educate people and/or raise funds for national/global issues. But I wouldn't say any of these are "hot-button" issues per say. Politics isn't a big topic of discussion, nor is religion. I guess the hottest topic on campus is probably anything having to do with career and business, but these don't make for very controversial/divided conversations.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

The winters in Rhode Island are fairly normal for anyone who has grown up in the northeast, but coming from Texas, they definitely took some getting used to. My advice if you're from a warmer climate is to stock up on clothes that you can layer (tanks under long-sleeved shirts under sweaters under jackets, etc.), winter accessories (hats, scarves, gloves, etc.), and invest in a good coat and snow shoes. Oh and rain boots too. Spring - and even fall - can be pretty rainy. That being said, fall and spring are gorgeous on campus and even winter has its unique beauty (think sunny days when everything is covered in fresh powdered snow). Another interesting thing about Bryant is the amount of group work we do in classes. Expect to be assigned group projects pretty much from day one. Around 80-90% of the classes I've taken in my four years have involved some sort of group work. This is meant to help prepare students for real-world work environments in which teamwork is very common. Sometimes group projects can be annoying and tedious, but looking back I can definitely see how they have helped me to grow as a person and learn to work well with all different kinds of people in groups. Other than that, get ready to have a lot of fun and work your butt off for the next 4 years! Every college experience has its ups and downs, and Bryant is no different. But in the end it will all be worth it, and you'll be looking back and wondering where the time has gone. So soak it up and take advantage of as many opportunities as you can.

What's the dating scene like?

The dating scene at Bryant is pretty divided. A large number of students are in serious relationships, whether on- or off-campus. Of course this group shifts throughout the four years, but it is always a pretty significant chunk of the student population. The rest of the student body tends to stick to casual hook-ups or flings. In other words, there's not a lot of actual "dating" (e.g. the guy takes you out to dinner or the movies) taking place at Bryant. The most effort a typical Bryant guy will put into a romantic interest is to invite her to his party next weekend. Maybe it's because I'm a little older than the rest of the students here (I'm 23 and a senior), but that just doesn't really cut it for me, so I stick to off-campus relationships as a general rule. Bryant students are generally fairly attractive and very fit, and the male-to-female ratio is 57-43. So there are plenty of dating options - particularly for women - if you are willing to deal with the pros and cons of dating on campus.

Describe the best and worst parts of the social scene on campus.

One of the best things about the social scene on campus is how close-knit the community is. Over 80% of students live on campus, and you get to know a ton of people through classes, involvements, etc. The downside is that - with just 3,500 students - it can feel a bit like high school at times. A lot of people stick to their own social groups most of the time, and it's hard to avoid running into that friend you're not getting along with on a daily basis, because campus is so small. That being said, I've made a few really close friends in my four years at Bryant, as well as a ton of extended friends in various social groups.

Describe a typical weekend.

The majority of Bryant students tend to have a "work hard, party hard" mentality, so going out on the weekends is the norm. WHERE students go out really varies by preference though. Some people prefer to hang out on campus and chill with their close friends; others like to go to on-campus parties (which can be a lot of fun, but are sort of hit or miss). Still others prefer to go off campus to Providence - or even Boston - to enjoy the restaurants and night life there. Students who prefer not to drink might tag along with their friends to parties anyway (and just not drink), or attend some of the Bryant @ Night events that are held on campus during the weekends (movies, comedians, etc). During weekend-days most students sleep in, do homework, and have meetings for various school projects or involvements. Some students go to sports games or participate in the many fundraising/charitable events that take place on weekends, such as Relay for Life, Special Olympics, etc. Others go home for the weekend, or take trips to Newport, Boston, NYC, or other destinations in the surrounding area. Although Bryant is a residential campus, there is always plenty to do both on campus and within easy driving distance.

Why did you decide to go to this school?

I applied to a number of both business and liberal arts schools in the Northeast. After receiving my acceptance letters, I first narrowed my choices down to the schools where I got the most financial aid and scholarships, which left me with four options. From there, I decided that I was more interested in getting a degree in business, which left me with two schools to choose between (Bryant and one of its main "competitors"). After taking a tour at the other school, and doing an overnight at Bryant (who reimbursed me for the cost of my plane ticket), I knew Bryant was where I wanted to be. The first thing I fell in love with about the school was the strong sense of community. Unlike the other school I visited, students at Bryant seemed really welcoming and close. The other big draw to the school was the International Business program, which I heard from multiple students was "the best" major to be at Bryant. Students talked about the amazing professors, the study abroad and language minor requirements, and the international job opportunities that come from being an "IB" major. As someone who has always dreamed of living and working abroad, there was no question left in my mind. Also, the campus is gorgeous. Since coming to Bryant (I'm now in my senior year), I've found that these are still among my favorite things about the university. I have absolutely loved the International Business program, and I have made some amazing friends from all over the world. I'm excited to graduate, but it's bittersweet to leave this place - and people - that I've come to consider my home.

Describe your favorite campus traditions.

My favorite tradition at Bryant is Festival of Lights. Held at the beginning of December, Festival of Lights is an all-day event. It starts in the morning when the Rotunda - the main room in our classroom building where everyone hangs out between classes - is transformed into a winter wonderland. Tables and chairs are replaced by arts and crafts stations (decorate ginger break, make your own ornaments, etc.), a place to take pictures with Mr. and Mrs. Claus, and more decorations and "snow" than you can imagine. Later that evening, hundreds of students, faculty and staff members reconvene in the Rotunda for the Festival of Lights ceremony, a moving demonstration of short speeches, dance, and prayer in honor of the many religions and faiths practiced at Bryant University. The ceremony culminates with everyone lighting the candles they were handed upon entering the room, and the lights from the hundreds of candles are reflected on the glass dome ceiling (a stunning display that leaves most first-time participants at a loss for words). Then, candles in hand, everyone walks out to the Christmas tree to watch the president light it for the first time. The Festival ends with hot chocolate, cider, and other goodies in the student center. Maybe it's because I'm such a Holiday person, but I really love volunteering for and participating in this event every year. It brings the whole campus together just before the most stressful time of the semester (finals) to have fun and give thanks for our many blessings and faiths.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

Most people would say that the stereotypical Bryant student is upper-middle-class, white, preppy, and from the New England area. While this may be the majority, Bryant has made a strong effort to become more diverse in recent years. International and multicultural students now make up a combined (approximately) 20% percent of the student body, and these numbers increase with every incoming class. In fact, part of the University’s 10-year strategic plan is to double the number of international and multicultural students to 20% each by 2020. More students are coming from non-New England states as well, as Bryant becomes better known throughout the U.S. Personally, I think the most noticeable similarity between most Bryant students is that most of us are strongly career-focused. The University is made up of a College of Liberal Arts and a College of Business, but even the liberal arts students at Bryant were typically drawn here because of the school requirement that all liberal arts majors have to minor in some area of business (and vice-versa). Students are attracted by Bryant's 98% job placement rate and we are not disappointed. From group projects/presentations and case analysis to resume-building workshops and career fairs, Bryant students are prepped for the job (and/or grad school) search from day one.

Tell us about the food and dining options.

I'm just going to post the same answer here that I put for "what students complain about most," because it covers this question as well... For our size, Bryant actually has a good variety of dining options. Salmanson is our cafeteria, and all students get a certain amount of "dining dollars" that they can spend in one of two cafes or the restaurant in our student center (South) each semester. Additionally, Bulldog Bucks can be added to your ID - which work just like regular money - to be used at Dunkin' Donuts, Subway, and the Scoop (an ice cream place/general food store). That being said, one of students biggest complaints is the poor quality of food on campus. This mostly applies to Salmanson, which despite recent upgrades, still fails to offer the top quality that can be found at other schools. It's difficult to articulate what it is about it that's not that great though. There's a pretty good variety and meals are changed up regularly. But something about the food just makes you feel kind of gross if you eat it on a regular basis (and as students are required to have a meal plan until senior year, you end up eating it a lot). Or maybe it's the fact that meal plans are so blatantly overpriced (I just did the math and price-per-meal ranges from $20.24 for a 7 meal/week plan to $9.09 for a 19 meal/week plan). That's completely outrageous, seeing as no one wants to eat in Salmo 19 times a week, and even at that rate, we end up paying more than the cost to just pay in cash to eat in the cafeteria. I know that over-charging for meal plans is a common practice at universities, but we could be eating 4-star meals at 7 meal-plan rate! My advice to the university: at least make the meal plans optional so students can avoid digging themselves even deeper into debt while pursuing an education in these tough economic times.

What's unique about your campus?

I've said this in a number of responses already, but Bryant's campus is truly one of the most beautiful I've ever seen. A wash of color in the spring and fall, lush and green in the summer, and a winter wonderland all winter, we get the best of all four seasons. Campus centers around a lovely pond, complete with a geyser-like fountain and a little bridge over the middle of it. Buildings have lots of windows to let in the natural light, and best of all, nothing is more than a 10-minute walk from anything else! All of our classes are held in a single building, so no freezing-cold walks between classes when the temps fall below freezing either.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

I feel like I've answered this question many times already, so I don't really have much to add. Like most stereotypes, there is some truth to the idea that the majority of Bryant students are from the New England area, fairly preppy, upper-middle-class, and studying business. However, there is also a significant international and multicultural presence on campus, as well as students with very diverse styles, backgrounds and majors (both business and liberal arts). I myself am from Texas, was home-schooled prior to college, have traveled extensively, and took a gap-year to work before coming to Bryant. Stereotypes can only brush the surface. You have to really get to know people before you can put a label on them (and even then, I don't think labels serve much of a purpose). So I guess you'll have to come visit and see for yourself!

When you step off campus what do you see?

Due to its fairly rural location, there isn't much to see directly around the 400-acre Bryant campus, other than the lush foliage typical of Rhode Island. The area behind campus is mostly residential, and Douglas Pike (the road that leads to campus) has a few hotels, a gas station, etc. Other than that, there are a couple of shopping centers within a 10-minute drive of campus, which supply Bryant students with food (grocery stores & restaurants), shopping, and some entertainment options (e.g. movie theaters). In terms of night life, there is a small restaurant/bar right off campus (Parentes), which is popular with students on Tuesday nights. Thursdays are usually at Effins Last Resort, a bar about 10 minutes from campus. Weekends are either spent on campus or going out in Providence, which is a 20-minute drive from campus. Bryant students can also ride the RIPTA (public busses in RI) for free, and many choose to take the RIPTA into Providence and cab back on the weekends for safety & budgeting reasons.

Describe the dorms.

The dorms at Bryant are best described by breaking them up by class. Freshmen live either in dorm rooms or suites (composed of 4 dorm rooms, a common room and a bathroom) in Halls 14 & 15 (dorms) or Hall 16 (suites). All of these halls have a common area where students can socialize, play games, watch TV, etc., a laundry room, and a small kitchen. These halls are some of the older ones on campus, but are still fairly nice and are well maintained by facilities. Sophomores and Juniors live in what is referred to as the "Village," a number of halls that are all suite-style living (composed of 3 dorm rooms, a common room, and a bathroom). They were all built around the same time as Halls 14, 15 and 16. Except for Hall 17, which is commonly referred to among students as the "hotel" hall, because it is that much nicer than the rest of them (suites control their own heating and A/C, toilets flush automatically, there is an elevator in the hall, etc). Since housing is picked by a combination of lotto numbers and # of credits, it's usually the students who are ahead in credits or get very lucky that live in 17. Most seniors live in townhouses, which are basically exactly what they sound like. The townhouses are a little bit further walk from all the main campus buildings (about 10-15 minutes as opposed to 5-10 from the other halls), but most would say the walk is worth it. For one thing, you have a much higher chance of getting a single room in a townhouse. Also, seniors are exempted from the meal-plan requirement, and most are happy to save money by making full use of their kitchens. Finally, the sense of community is even stronger in the townhouses, and seniors regularly have friends over for "family dinners" or to play games, watch movies, or party on the weekends.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

With over 90 clubs and organizations, every Bryant student can find at least one activity/group to be a part of. Some of the more popular organizations include the Student Programming Board (which runs all sorts of fun events on campus), WJMF (our campus radio station), the Linked Through Leadership Program, the International Students Organization, and the Multicultural Student Union. Major-specific or language/culture specific orgs are also very popular with students. I am personally involved in the Linked Through Leadership program (as a Leadership Council member I help plan and coordinate the program's institutes and retreats), the Student Alumni Association, the Archway (our school's newspaper), and Omicron Delta Kappa (a national leadership honors society). I also participate in many of the cultural events and performances on campus, including I2I in the fall (a show that features performances centered around different countries), Extravaganza (a fashion show that serves as the culmination of black history month), and the Vagina Monologues. I was also a Student Senate representative my sophomore year, and took part in the Linked Through Leadership program prior to becoming a Leadership Council member. In addition to clubs and orgs, Bryant hosts dozens of guest speakers and performances each month, which are popular with many students. As a Division 1 school, a good portion of the student population also participates in sports. Bryant has a large number of Varsity, Intramural and Club teams.

Tell us about your professors.

I've said this in a number of my other responses already, but I will repeat it here: professors at Bryant are incredibly dedicated and accessible to their students. Classes typically range from 20-35 students, so the amount of personal attention in class already far exceeds that at other schools. But Bryant professors go way above and beyond that. Every professor is required to hold open office hours for several hours a week, during which students can come talk to them about homework questions, exams, or anything else. Additionally, most professors will make time outside of their office hours if they don't work with a student's schedule. I even know of some professors that have regular breakfast or lunch meetings with students to get to know them better, and help them with anything they might have questions with. Bryant professors are also very involved in other aspects of campus life. They advise organizations, present at meetings (for example, a number of professors lead sessions in the campus Leadership Development programs), spearhead initiatives (such as the diversity initiative and women's resource collaborative), organize speakers and events, provide career advise and recommendations to students, and much more. The incredible faculty at Bryant are one of the top things I - and many other students - love about this school.

Where is the best place to get work done on campus?

For its small size, Bryant offers plenty of places to study. The most popular choices are the library - which has a number of study rooms, a designated quiet area, and plenty of sofas and tables to do work at - and classrooms when there aren't classes going on in them. There are also study rooms on every floor of the freshman halls and Hall 17 (the nicest hall on campus, which houses sophomores and juniors), and a number of little nooks with sofas or tables & chairs all around campus. Personally, I used the study lounge in my freshman hall a lot and since then I've mostly stuck to doing work in my room (I've been blessed with relatively quiet suite-mates). However, I know a lot of other seniors who still go to the library/classrooms/etc. when they need to get a lot of work done.

What are the most popular classes offered?

With the wide range of both business and liberal arts majors and minors available at Bryant, it's impossible to say what the most popular classes are. I am an International Business major with a double-concentration in Marketing and Spanish, and my personal favorites that I've taken so far include: International Business 101, Global Human Resource Management, Spanish, Poetry Writing, and all of my classes I took abroad (Latin American history/politics/culture, etc.). I think it's less about the classes at Bryant and more about the teachers. There are some names that you hear over and over again as great professors, and a lot of students base their class choices off of that, rather than achieving the "ideal" schedule (or a mix of both).

Describe your school to someone who's never heard of it.

Bryant is a small, tight-knit college in Rhode Island. We have a college of business and a college of liberal arts, and students that major in one are required to minor in the other (for example, a Finance major has to minor in a liberal art and a Psychology major has to minor in business). The campus is gorgeous - built on 400 acres in rural RI - and although it is a little remote, it's only a 20-minute drive from Providence, 45 minutes from Boston, and about 4 hours from NYC. It is a very residential community; 80% of students live on campus, and the close community feeling is a big part of what makes Bryant such a special place. We have a reputation for strong academics and recently completed the transition to Division I athletics. The majority of students are from New England and the northeast, but we have a growing international population, and as the school becomes better known, students are also being attracted from states as far away as Texas (where I'm from) and California. There are over 80 clubs and organizations on campus, and most students are involved in at least one. Students are very active as well, those who don't play a varsity/club/intramural sport are active gym-goers (there are also a couple of dance teams and a cheer-leading squad on campus). Winters are long and cold, but fall and spring are breath-taking and (almost) make all those cold months worth it. My favorite things about the school are the International Business program, the beautiful campus, the incredibly dedicated and accessible faculty and staff, and the strong community feel.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

Most people would say that the stereotypical Bryant student is upper-middle-class, white, preppy, and from the New England area. While this may be the majority, Bryant has made a strong effort to become more diverse in recent years. International and multicultural students now make up a combined (approximately) 20% percent of the student body, and these numbers increase with every incoming class. In fact, part of the University’s 10-year strategic plan is to double the number of international and multicultural students to 20% each by 2020. More students are coming from non-New England states as well, as Bryant becomes better known throughout the U.S. Personally, I think the most noticeable similarity between most Bryant students is that most of us are strongly career-focused. The University is made up of a College of Liberal Arts and a College of Business, but even the liberal arts students at Bryant were typically drawn here because of the school requirement that all liberal arts majors have to minor in some area of business (and vice-versa). Students are attracted by Bryant's 98% job placement rate and we are not disappointed. From group projects/presentations and case analysis to resume-building workshops and career fairs, Bryant students are prepped for the job (and/or grad school) search from day one.

Describe the students at your school.

I think I covered most of this in the question on stereotypes, but I’ll just add that in general, students are fairly conservative to middle-of-the-road in their political views (although politics aren’t a huge topic of discussion on campus). There is some cliquey-ness, with student athletes, multicultural/international, and “everyone else” sticking mostly to themselves, but there is also a lot of intermingling among groups, especially in the countless group projects for classes and many of the involvements on campus.

What are the academics like at your school?

Many students (myself included) would cite close relationships with faculty as one of the best things about this school. Whether going over your latest exam, providing you with advice and resources to help you reach your goals (in college and beyond), or simply grabbing coffee and catching up on life, professors are incredibly accessible and dedicated to their students. The large number of core class requirements can make your first couple of years at Bryant feel like a chore, but will serve you well as an upperclassman (applying for jobs or grad school) when you can speak to your strong background in all the core areas of both a business and liberal arts education, no matter your major. I personally wish there were more flexibility and options in the curriculum to take the fun electives I hear about from my friends at other schools, like calligraphy or yoga. That being said, I am really happy with my education overall. I am particularly passionate about the International Business Program at Bryant, which is one of the best in the country. “IB” majors are required to concentrate in a core business area (Finance, Marketing, Accounting, Computer Information Systems, Management, or Entrepreneurship), and either minor or demonstrate fluency in a foreign language (in which case you would minor in some other liberal art). Nearly every class you take is globally-focused – so while your friends are taking Finance, you’ll be taking Global Finance – and everyone studies abroad during the fall of their Junior year. When you return, you go through an intense “Integrated Block” in which you run a simulated business with your team, and your senior year ends with a real-life semester-long consulting project. “IB” students and faculty are among the most tight-knit on campus, so if you come to Bryant (in my admittedly-biased opinion), it is definitely the way to go.

Eric
Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

A small, business school with the feel of family all around you.

Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

A small, business school with the feel of family all around you.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Bryant University is a great school with a high success rate from their graduates. From being here, I have made so many friends and have learned so much about my future, society, and schooling in general. It has been so valuable for me to attend here, because the teachers are so helpful and help everyone because the class sizes do not exceed 35 students. It will be valuable in the near future when I have the great job of and actuary that I've always wanted, and I know I would not have been able to achieve it without the help Bryant University gives me. This college has also striked my interest in new hobbies like playing guitar and piano. Overall, Bryant University is here for me to learn and make dreams become a reality; it's just up to the student to make this all happen.

John
Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

The sschool is a small business college.

Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

The sschool is a small business college.

Describe the students at your school.

My classmates are normal college students, at school for an education.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

What I have taken from my college experience so far has been the opportunity to learn in many different ways. Sure I have learned in the classroom from my professors, but I have learned equally as much outside the classroom. I have met new students, made new friends, and have become a part of the campus community. I have learned a lot about myself. College has been a whole new way of life. There is no one telling you what to do or reminding you to get your work done. It is all on me. College has made me more responsible. I have to manage my time and get my priorities in order. College is an opportunity to learn skills and get training that I will use in the future as I go forward into my career. College also will teach me the life skills that will stay with me and shape who I will become long after I graduate.

Sheri
Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

It's mostly a business school and everyone has to take business classes even if it's not their major. No one can live off ca...

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

It's mostly a business school and everyone has to take business classes even if it's not their major. No one can live off campus unless they commute, but there are no apartments. There are small homes for seniors that are kind of like apartments.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

I love Bryant University and I never imagined myself wanting to stay at school through breaks. The students and teachers make this experience great and I learn a lot from everyone else there. It is a small school so I get individual attention and teachers are willing to sit down with me and explain material I do not understand in the classroom. I have learned the value of hard work and good grades. In high school, I never had to do homework or study much to get good grades, but in college, it is different. It is very challenging and I spend most of my time on school work. It is all worth it in the end because I made the Dean's list and I am proud of the work I do. Not only do I spent time on work, but I also spend time making new friends and enjoying the whole college experience. Having friends down the hallway that I can see at any time makes me have to manage my time and not waste it. It has been very valuable to attend college because I am learning more than I did in high school and becoming independent.

What's the most frustrating thing about your school?

The work is very challenging and people think that our majors are jokes because in any other school, business is not a hard major, but at Bryant, it's the entire school basically so it's not a joke and you actually have to work hard.

Maria
Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

This is a well rounded school that prepares students for any of their current and future aspirations, especially when it come...

Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

This is a well rounded school that prepares students for any of their current and future aspirations, especially when it comes to the area of business by providing them with experiences and helpful staff, a great technological connection with wireless resources throughtout the campus and numerous other sources.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

I have experienced many different situations and moments that have truly helped me in developing my character and shaping me into the person I am today. My experiences have truly been some of the best in my life. I have met some outstanding people that have made me want to push myself and accomplish things I've never thought of accomplishing being a first generation college student after first moving to this country from the Dominican Republic. My professors helpfulness, the great friends Ive met, the valuable resources and tremendous service learning experiences traveling to New Orleans, Dominican Republic and other states across the country with my Rugby team, Have all truly been the building blocks to my development. They have all taught me very different lessons but keeping the same goal and focus in mind of pushing mysef to be the best I can be and in helping other along my journey making it an even more rewarding experience along the way. So, what exactly have I received from my college experience....EVERYTHING! It was a small school in Smithfield, RI but the best 4 years of my life.

What kind of person should attend this school?

A person that is into business and wants to receive a well rounded education with many of the best resources available to them.

James
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

I would not make the same mistakes that I did in spending money. Although I consider myself to be very financially responsible, after my first semester of college I had spent the majority of my savings (which wasn't much) on things that I didn't need to spend money on. My spending was mainly due to having eight roommates who wanted to do something that costs money - - something that I would not normally do. Being in college is about expiriencing life on your own and learning to be independent, as well as financially responsible.

Aieshia
Describe your favorite campus traditions.

We are a mostly a business school, but are now opening up the liberal arts section. It is harder for liberal arts majors to g...

Describe your favorite campus traditions.

We are a mostly a business school, but are now opening up the liberal arts section. It is harder for liberal arts majors to get a job at this time unfortunately. Business majors usually have no problem unless they aren't trying.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

I would tell myself not to underestimate any class, and stick with your syllabus, because it has VERY important information in it! You have to study a lot for exams, and remember you can never study too hard. There is a lot to remember and it doesn't hurt to go over notes after class either. Classes here are ten times as hard as high school classes. Don't party when you should be studying. You will remember a bad grade more than you remember a party you went to. If there's something you don't understand, don't be afraid to ask the teacher, they are there to help. They like to see you taking an interest in your education. There is also the Academic Center for Excellence which helps with papers and had labs for major business classes as well as tutors for one on one help. Your parents are spending a lot of money to ensure you had a stable job, don't waste their funds. Education should be your number one priority in college!

What kind of person should attend this school?

The type of person that should attend Bryant University is someone who is friendly and isn't afraid to try new things. Also someone who can think out the box and is going to add different ideas in various situations. There are many group projects in which you compete with other groups in other sections of this class.

Kelly
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

I would tell myself that college is a very different lifestyle and although you might think your study habits are sufficient ...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

I would tell myself that college is a very different lifestyle and although you might think your study habits are sufficient from highschool there are serious adjustments you will have to make. There is a much greater amount of free time that you will be tempted to waste. The workload is less but the tests are worth a greater amount so it is vital that you prepare well for the tests and not just cram the information in the night before because you WILL NOT get the grades you got in highschool by doing this. The library is a useful place to study and is probably not somewhere you are used to going but it will benifit you even if its only for an hour everyday. The resources that colleges offer are very reliable and should be taken advantage of in order to get the most out of your college experience. Do not think that you can go out to parties when you have class the next day even if all of your work is finished. Your learning after a night of drinking and staying out late is not the same.

What do you consider the worst thing about your school? Why?

The worth thing about Bryant University is that it is very similar to highschool. Since there are only about 3500 students that attend, over a few years you get familiar with everyone who goes there. Everyone knows information about eachother personal life and it is hard to fix a reputation that you might have been given.

What's the most frustrating thing about your school?

The most frustrating thing about Bryant University is the profressors. Many of the professors do not seem qualified to be teaching at the college level or they do not seem motivated to be teaching. This makes it hard for me personally to be motivated about the subject especially when its a subject that is not part of my major that I already have no interest in. Some (not all) of the professors i've had do not relate well to students which makes it hard for many to learn.

alycia
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

If I was to go back in time I would tell myself to chose a career that best fits my personality. I am extremely outgoing and ...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

If I was to go back in time I would tell myself to chose a career that best fits my personality. I am extremely outgoing and enjoy helping others in need suceed. I will take any chance I have to help someone that needs it. I knew in my heart I wanted to be in a job that serviced others however, at a young age I was blinded. I ended up going to school for business because my father was in business and I thought that was the right thing to do. Now at 27, I've left the working world to pursue my dream of becoming a Physical Therapist. I 've been shadowing at a hospital and find helping others very gratifying. The most rewarding part of this career for me would be to know I have helped in making someone's quality of life better.

What's the one thing you wish someone had told you about freshman year?

Before I decided to attend Bryant now looking back I wish I had picked a college or university that had other avenues to pursue. If I had attended a liberal arts college that had other majors other than business I may have picked an undergraduate major that would have been a better fit for me in order to get into the graduate program I'm applying to. I am hoping to get into a Doctor of Physical Therapy program this summer.

What's the most frustrating thing about your school?

The most frustrating part about Bryant University was the cost of tuition. At the age of 18, I wanted to pursue a degree in business and the total cost in order to do this was over 100,000 dollars. I wouldn't change getting a bachelor's degree I just wish wish colleges would be more cost effective. My school was private and did not offer any type of instate tuition which was frustrating as well.

Details

  • Enrollment
  • 3,462
  • Tuition & Fees
  • $40,962
  • Acceptance rate
  • 67%

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