Baltimore, MD
Johns Hopkins University


149 Ratings

On-Campus Housing

Off-Campus Housing

Campus Food

Campus Facilities

Class Size

Activities

Local Services

Academics

You may be eligible! These Lenders offer loans to students who attend Johns Hopkins University

Variable  rate loan

disclosure
*Results provided by SimpleTuition.
SimpleTuition is an independent comparison site and is not affiliated with colleges or universities that may be referenced in these results. Loan offers from participating lenders that appear also have no affiliation with any college or university referenced. Not all lenders participate in our site and lenders that do participate may not offer loans to every school. We remind users that there are many additional borrowing options available - use SimpleTuition as part of your larger quest for college financing. Shop around and make the choice that's best for you and maximize use of grants and federal aid options whenever possible. We may receive transaction or referral fees when a user selects a product from a partner lender or advertiser. Our company mission is based on the premise that choice and transparency are good. There is no additional cost to a user who selects a loan presented by one of our partners.

Recent Reviews

Nicolette
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

To be honest, I would tell myself to take more chances in college. When I was a freshmen, I focused almost all of my time and...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

To be honest, I would tell myself to take more chances in college. When I was a freshmen, I focused almost all of my time and energy on my schoolwork. Although doing well in college academically is definitely important, I found myself at the end of first semester with very few friends, as I had spent most of my time in my room, studying with my roommate. I didn't attend many of the optional orientation events because I'm shy and thought I would be uncomfortable. However, I now wish that I had taken advantage of more of these opportunities, not having realized beforehand how important the social aspect is to the college experience as well. If I could go back in time and talk to myself as a high school senior, I would tell myself to be brave and push myself out of my comfort zone. I would tell myself not to be afraid of being who I really am. I would tell myself to go to every school event, no matter how lame it might sound. Education isn't the only thing that lasts a lifetime; friendship does too.

What's unique about your campus?

The best thing about my school is that it's very well-known and therefore can offer students great opportunities that might not be available at other colleges. I've had the opportunity to hear lectures from an accomplished screenwriter and an astronaut, among others. My astronomy teacher won a Nobel Peace Prize, and our theater department is run by the actor John Astin. The professors are extremely knowledgable in their fields, thereby providing the best education possible.

What kind of person should not attend this school?

You shouldn't attend this school if you are not driven and do not have a desire to learn. The coursework is extremely difficult. The teachers know that the students here are smart and capable, so they don't make anything easy. Most teachers are often more than willing to help students who are struggling. However, if students don't take the work seriously, it is easy to get a bad grade or to fail. The students at Hopkins want to learn. They push themselves to do the best that they can.

Kathryn
What is your overall opinion of this school?

This school has wonderful opportunities for any individual. My favorite thing about Hopkins is that it is very easy to craft ...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

This school has wonderful opportunities for any individual. My favorite thing about Hopkins is that it is very easy to craft your college experience to be whatever you want it to be. The system of distribution requirements makes double, or even triple, majoring miraculously doable, allowing students to pursue diverse interests. Even beyond academics, the student population is so diverse that it is easy to find people to relate to. There aren’t many cliques; even those in different Greek organizations get along well. It also has a small, liberal arts college feel, while still offering valuable opportunities only available at a research institution, like generous research grants. It's also big enough to where students can meet someone new almost every day, but the community still feels tight-knit. While classes can be difficult and stress does accumulate for everyone sometimes, there are still many outlets to have fun that make the college experience at Hopkins very manageable. There are also many ways to relax, like laying on "the beach," a large grassy area at the front of campus on sunny days with friends. Overall, I am extremely satisfied with my experience at Hopkins, both academically and socially.

What's the hardest thing about freshman year?

Time management is very different from high school, and I think that was the hardest part to get used to. In college, you have a lot more free time, but it can be difficult to use it wisely. It takes time to form good time management skills, and I think that's what I struggled with the most my freshman year.

What's the one thing you wish someone had told you about freshman year?

I wish someone had told me to take more advantage of covered grades. At Hopkins, the first semester of grades are covered, so they never show up on your transcript. I ended up working really hard when I didn't need to!

Why did you decide to go to this school?

I wanted to go to a school that had a great international studies program, great study abroad opportunities, and lots of freedom in scheduling (like no core requirements!), so Hopkins was a great fit!

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

Hopkins students are often pegged as being addicted to studying, with no interest in having fun. The reality is that Hopkins students have a sort of "work hard play hard" mentality. While the week can be a lot of work, come the weekend Hopkins students really know how to relax and have a good time! All the things to do around campus make it easy to maintain a balance between work and play that fits each individual. For example, while a student may spend most week nights in the library, on Friday they will probably go to a party or hang out with friends, and have all weekend. Students find many ways to release the stress of the week during the weekend.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

It’s difficult to discern which groups are the most popular on campus, as there are so many extracurricular activities. Lacrosse is definitely the most popular sport, many people attend the games. Other than Lacrosse, there is not too much interest in other sports around campus. Other popular extracurriculars include a multitude of tutoring organizations, Model United Nations, and Spring Fair committee (they help organize the giant festival that happens in April at Hopkins). I am involved in Model UN, a tutoring organization, and an organization that brings speakers to debate American foreign affairs on campus. 25% of students are involved in Greek life, so it is pretty big around campus (I am in a sorority as well). Still, it is not necessary to be in a sorority or fraternity to have fun on campus. Most parties though, at least the ones that freshmen and sophomores frequent are centered around frats (sororities have no houses). There are also a few bars around campus that students go to. Most students go out on Fridays and Saturdays to drink, but sometimes more. From Sunday to Wednesday though, most students stay in and study. Students who don’t want to drink will still be able to find lots of things to do on campus, and won’t feel uncomfortable with the amount of drinking that goes on. The dorms are social, but

Describe the students at your school.

The first thing that comes to mind when asked to describe Hopkins students is their commitment. Most students here are very studious and hardworking, and will put a lot of time into doing well in their classes. Granted, there are still many lazy students. While students are committed to doing well, they still make time to unwind. In my opinion, there are not many cliques. I have been able to drift between many different groups of friends easily. Some people do separate themselves based on race, and the athletes generally stick together, but they still mingle with other groups. There is a gap in the economic status of many students, as most students here either pay for their education with significant aid or straight out of their pockets. As such, it can be uncomfortable for students to talk about money. Generally, I think that Hopkins is fairly diverse and laid back. People do not dress especially well, so there is not pressure to look good all the time either. It’s not uncommon to go to class in sweat pants, although many students will dress nicely anyways. Ultimately, I feel that almost any type of person can find a place at Hopkins where they are comfortable.

What are the academics like at your school?

Starting answering!Hopkins is definitely known for being strong in the natural sciences, but it’s very strong in other areas as well. I am an International Studies, East Asian studies, and Economics triple major, and my experience in humanities and social sciences classes has been very good. The system of distribution requirements in place of core curriculum is also very convenient, as it gives students a great deal of freedom in choosing their courses and makes double, or even triple majoring, very easy. The professors are great, and in most cases very approachable. Professors in my departments are generally committed to the success of their students. One of my professors in particular gives students a lot of help in finding research grants and emails us every time she hears about an internship or research opportunity. Contrary to many rumors about Hopkins, the professors are not solely focused on their graduate students and research, but do care about the success of their undergrads. Classes do expect a lot from their students, but the work load is not too unmanageable. I also feel that the assignments genuinely give me a better understanding of the material in lectures. Still, because of the work load, it is difficult to get through the semester without pulling at least one all-nighter (or many, in my case). Many days students will spend upwards of 6 hours in the library. There are a lot of large lecture classes (100-200 students), but most upper level classes are smaller (around 10 students. I have had good experiences in both kinds of classes. Overall, I feel that while the academics are demanding, most students believe it’s worth coming to Hopkins for.

Alan
What is your overall opinion of this school?

I think this school is a wonderful place. Specifically, Hopkins allows you to pursue academic interests which makes a unique ...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

I think this school is a wonderful place. Specifically, Hopkins allows you to pursue academic interests which makes a unique college experience. As an Applied Mathematics and Physics major, the school's absence of a core has allowed me to focus on my passions. That being said, there are aspects of the school I'd like to change. Specifically, most math and science classes are at 8am and have quite a large lecture size so there seems to be an absence of professor student interaction. I love the fact that going to Hopkins has allowed me to form friendships and close relationships with faculty on this campus.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

The stereotype of Johns Hopkins is that everyone is science driven and the social life is abysmal. However, that is not the case. Specifically, in my time at Hopkins I have met a variety of people whose academic interests vary along with their professional goals. An aspect of Hopkins that I didn't expect was the heavy presence of Greek life. Although a small percentage of the student population is involved in Greek life, most of the people involved on this campus are in Greek life.

Anna
What is your overall opinion of this school?

I love Hopkins, and I can't imagine going elsewhere. The University staff genuinely love helping students, and there's a vari...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

I love Hopkins, and I can't imagine going elsewhere. The University staff genuinely love helping students, and there's a variety of offices and organizations to help get you situated emotionally, professionally, you name it. The academic programs are rigorous, and most people are dismayed by the lack of grade inflation, but I often hear that Hopkins alumni kick butt in grad school due to the work ethic they acquired during their undergraduate years. If you come from a small school, it may seem daunting to attend a 4,500-person university, but by sophomore or junior year, you'll find that you indirectly know just about everyone. The mentality here is work hard, play hard. The library reaches full capacity around finals, but those same library rats are blackout at the frat or at campus bars as soon as they're finished.

What are the academics like at your school?

Academics are rigorous--don't expect grade inflation. Professors and generally available outside of lecture for outside help and enjoy getting to know their students. Since this is a research university, many of the studies you learn about actually came from a lab right here in Baltimore. One of my psych professors showed us a video of a study that she did, with her own child. I really enjoy that there aren't any classes that everyone is required to take--individual majors assign distribution credits. A few fond memories I have are with my fellow Applied Math majors, sitting around a dorm common room, laughing from delirium at 4:00 a.m. trying to figure out how to do homework that's due the next day.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

Everybody thinks that Hopkins is made up of competitive nerds that never crawl out of D-Level in the library. I think there are definitely a few of those, but for the most part, I've never come across too many. In fact, the majority of people I meet are friendly and happy to go out of their way to help out. It's a tough school--it'll be hard to pull through with your sanity, a social life, and good grades without a little camaraderie and late nights working on homework in your dorm common room.

Tina
What is your overall opinion of this school?

You definitely get what you pay for at this school. You get a challenging course load and many opportunities to participate i...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

You definitely get what you pay for at this school. You get a challenging course load and many opportunities to participate in the real world or to do great research. People complain about how hard it is and how much it costs, but in the end, you come out with valuable tools. Not only do you leave this school with a great quality of education, you also leave this school with a sound work ethic and leadership skills that will undoubtedly make you successful wherever you utilize it. Depending on your major, you have the opportunity to either take classes at the grad school, do research on various campuses, or interact with people in Baltimore. Johns Hopkins is a great school and many people know that.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

One stereotype is that there is cut-throat competition at the school. This isn't accurate. Although, there is a little competition, it's certainly not cut-throat. It's very possible to find a person to partner up with for studying or to borrow notes from if you ever miss a class.

Andrea
Describe the students at your school.

Everybody needs to have the top grades and GPAs or else they will not get into the top medical schools, because a huge majori...

Describe the students at your school.

Everybody needs to have the top grades and GPAs or else they will not get into the top medical schools, because a huge majority of the population of undergraduates at Johns Hopkins University are pre-med.

What kind of person should attend this school?

Someone who is very concerned about weeding out the competition in their field of study. Everyone is concerned about doing better than the next person instead of being concerned about how well they can do by themselves without making comparisons.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

If I could go back to being a high school senior, I would give myself advice about focusing more on my own academic abilities, rather than constantly comparing myself to other people. My first semester at Johns Hopkins University consisted of me worrying more about how much I didn’t know, instead of honing onto my already acquired skills to do well. Hopkins students can be very cutthroat when it comes to grades and GPAs, and I thought I wouldn’t have a problem fitting in with being the valedictorian of my high school. But I had a rude awakening when I discovered that I was way behind where I should have been, when compared to many of my classmates. If I could go back in time, I would advise myself to take it all as a challenge, and do all that I could with the study skills that helped me during my high school years. Also I would warn myself to realize the college experience is about one’s own success measured by one’s own capabilities, not by those around you. Personally, it would have made my transition much easier and I would have believed in myself more.

jessie
Describe the students at your school.

My classmates are an ecclectic bunch of quirky, intellectual individuals who thrive on challenge and caffeine and are always ...

Describe the students at your school.

My classmates are an ecclectic bunch of quirky, intellectual individuals who thrive on challenge and caffeine and are always willing to lend a hand.

Describe your favorite campus traditions.

Best known for its academic prestige, Hopkins also supports the number one Biomedical Engineering program in the nation as well as an all round outstanding reputation.

Sara-Lee
What is your overall opinion of this school?

When I first got into Johns Hopkins, I was super excited! I was 18 and finally going to be away from home with some freedom a...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

When I first got into Johns Hopkins, I was super excited! I was 18 and finally going to be away from home with some freedom and a chance to make my own mistakes. Unfortunately, leaving home means not having your family there one hundred percent of the time. I became extremely homesick and hated being in Baltimore. But over the years, I grew up and learned to love Hopkins. Overall, the school is academically challenging but still fun. Although we're all nerds and need to get our homework done before attending that Friday nights frat party, we manage. With Hopkins, location is everything. Being in the city is great because there are lots to do and lots of different forms of cheap/free transportation. Being a medium sized school with about 5,000 enrollees, it is sometimes hard to see new faces but since we're in the center of a college town, meeting new people off campus is super easy. The administration is supportive of all student endeavors and there are staff that can help you with just about everything. I love being at Hopkins and I am definitely going to miss it when I leave. The lacrosse games, the stressful finals, the international students, and the excessive amount of things to do - academic and otherwise - made it all worth it.

Why did you decide to go to this school?

I decided to go to Johns Hopkins because of the generous financial package I received. I applied to a bunch of big named schools and got into almost all of them. Johns Hopkins happened to give me the most money and because my family could not afford to pay $54,000 a year out of pocket, there was no question.

Describe the students at your school.

Students at Johns Hopkins are super competitive and extremely focused on their studies. Hopkins is NOT a party school to say the least. Granted kids still tend to throw parties and venture out to the frats or the local bars every now and then, they still manage to get their 12 hours of studying in beforehand. Students that are more about just getting by and only being social would feel very out of place here. This school is for serious academic students who enjoy intellectual challenges. How students dress varies because there are many different types of students here. But think of normal college campus kids in your head and that is Hopkins.for you. The students come from all over the country and the world and the financial backgrounds of these students also vary. Everyone and their interests and beliefs differ tremendously.

What are the academics like at your school?

Academics are super important at Johns Hopkins. Students take their studies extremely seriously and study all the time. To prove this, JHU is building an extension to the library rather than a student center which we do not have. Students are super competitive and some will even refuse to help another with something as simple as homework. Everyone tries to get ahead. There are a variety of different types of classes. There are big ones and small ones ranging from 8 students all the way to 400. Because of these different sizes, there are lectures, seminars, sections, labs, etc. Some professors are nicer than others. Some take the time to get to know you and others do not. Class participation is important only in some classes but I always make an effort to say something every class. My favorite class has been the Italian Language classes I've taken since Freshman year. They are really small and concentrated and the professors take the time to really get to know you and your strengths and weaknesses when learning the language. The most unique class I have taken, however, was an Intersession class about photography and Baltimore titled "Charm City Through the Lens." It took students out to Baltimore and had them explore the city and express it through photographs. I'm majoring in International Studies and the department has been super helpful in all of my endeavors. They give their honest opinion without a second thought. Besides the fact that the competitiveness can get to you and stress you out, education at Hopkins is super challenging and takes a certain amount of self motivation and determination but is definitely proving to be worth it when venturing into the outside world.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

There are many different stereotypes when it comes to Johns Hopkins University students. They range depending on different variables including major, gender, year, etc. The main stereotype which usually pertains to all students, however, is that everyone is super competitive and that no one looks out for anyone else. For instance, people aren't too keen on studying in groups or helping out with homework. Everyone just looks out for themselves. Some people even say that when in class, some people will not even lend you a pen or a calculator because they want to do whatever they can to stay ahead of you. The truth about this stereotype is similar to many other stereotypes in the world - it depends on the person. Truthfully, I have come across those people that will act as though they haven't completed their homework as yet so they "cannot help you" with yours or they haven't started to study for a certain exam so they do not want to "study together." But at the same time, I have come across other students that are more than willing to help with homework, studying, and anything else you need help with. Of course everyone is really focused and really busy with homework, exams, work, research, internships, etc. so it cannot be expected for people to bend over backwards for another. Fortunately, the students who refuse to ever help allow you to find the nicer bunch who aren't out only for themselves.

Mackenzie
Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

Ten years down the road I see myself a succesful plastic surgeon, reconstructing the faces of burn victims and ameliorating c...

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

Ten years down the road I see myself a succesful plastic surgeon, reconstructing the faces of burn victims and ameliorating cleft lips. My acceptance to Hopkins served as the gateway to my desired future. Hopkins is an oasis for opportunities in medical research, and a deeper and different kind of learning. Here, I cannot survive by simply memorizing. Here, I must truly understand the root of the problem and all of its aspects to solve the problem. Here, I grow into a more cultured individual to better serve the world and live a fulfilling life.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Looking back I would tell myself to relax. Don't worry about all the small details, college essays I wish I would have written differenly, or fret about the distant future. I would tell myself to savor the moment. To enjoy giggling with my high school friends, and capture the feeling of a warm greeting and hug from my mom home. To not be so eager to start a new life, so eager that I forget to live in the now, because it will come in the same due time. As Ralph Waldo Emerson said, "With the past, I have nothing to do; nor with the future. I live now." Everything will work out just fine. Don't forget to enjoy the road your life begins to take, because it's a much more pleasant road if you realize the gifts and embrace the opportunities you are given.

What do you consider the worst thing about your school? Why?

Every school has its cons. The worst thing about Hopkins is the competition for good grades. It seems as though my best is never enough, there is always more to give even if it doesn't seem possible.

Samita
What is your overall opinion of this school?

One of the first things you'll realize about this place, is that it's fun. Despite the academic rigor in place, Hopkins affil...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

One of the first things you'll realize about this place, is that it's fun. Despite the academic rigor in place, Hopkins affiliates have a sense of humor. Students regularly receive videos of flash mobs or lip dubs to funny Hopkins jingles. Even the deans and the staff are involved! I remember for April Fool's Day during my sophomore year, Hopkins wrote an article about finally surrendering to frustration and removing the 's' from Johns [Hopkins], and even photoshopped photographs of staff removing the letter 's' from landmark signs. I didn't expect Hopkins to participate (so cleverly!) in April Fool's Day - what highly ranked school really embraces its inner child? Hopkins may surprise you, but it will not bore you.

Describe the best and worst parts of the social scene on campus.

The best is that there's always something to do on campus during the day. The worst is that there isn't always much to do during the evening/night.

What's the Greek scene like?

I'm not the right person to ask.

Describe a typical weekend.

If I want to have fun here, I'll usually have a small party at my house, go to one of my friends', or go out in the city to a restaurant or lounge. I also like late night movies, and that's always an option.

What do students complain about most?

The work load, for sure.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

Nerdy and pre-med, but I really don't think that's a true fit.

What's the dating scene like?

A normal mix, I'd say. It's not weird to see couples, and it's not weird to see single students.

What are some hot-button issues on campus?

Race and sexuality gets talked about pretty openly around here. Not in a bad way, in a raising awareness kind of way.

Where is the best place to get work done on campus?

I don't like the library, but a lot of people go there to study... and socialize. There are a lot of student centers and quiet rooms in the academic buildings. I prefer those to the library. A new learning center is also opening up this summer, so there will be more than enough places to work.

What are the most popular classes offered?

General Chem, Bio, Physics and those kinds of classes for all the pre-meds. Beyond that though, it's really up to you. Popularity isn't a factor here when you're picking classes. It's about interest.

Describe your school to someone who's never heard of it.

It's a top school, it's pretty, it'll introduce you to a new city, and it'll open doors for you (even if you're not pre-med).

Describe a day on campus you'll never forget.

I had a pretty moving night this year when we held a 9/11 10th Anniversary Commemoration. People, in mass, can be extremely supportive.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

No, I wouldn't say so. I don't fit it, and neither do my friends.

Describe the dorms.

They really look like any other dorms at any other college. Small, with the same looking furniture. But there are a lot of suite type dorming, which is great because I hate communal bathrooms.

Describe your favorite campus traditions.

Hopkins does things like First Night and Lighting of the Quads, which are annual traditions where you pretty much stand outside, mingle, and eat free food. They try to have a bunch of class-year related events, and if you go to them, I'm sure you'd have a good time with your friends.

Tell us about the food and dining options.

Meal plans are expensive, but the food is good! The freshmen place to eat, the FFC, has gotten better and better every year and works buffet style. There is also a place in the middle of campus, that is unfortunately only open during lunch. Nolan's is offered for dinner from 5 to midnight. And the food options off campus are extensive enough that you won't get bored.

What's unique about your campus?

Not sure - I haven't really been on too many other college campuses. I imagine the amount of free food we have, the free crafts (ie make your own road sign), etc.

When you step off campus what do you see?

Food! Right off campus, there's a strip on St. Paul with a bunch of places to eat. But you should definitely go beyond that. There's a cool city out here - a small Little Italy, the Harbor, Towson, Hampden, and even Greenmount if you're used to a place like Brooklyn, NY like I am.

Tell us about the sports scene on campus.

Sports isn't big here. Even lacrosse games are lacking in terms of how many fans are sitting on the bleachers. Homecoming is in the spring, and I'll admit, I only go for the free food.

Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

It's really pretty! The campus is one of the biggest reasons that made me pick Hopkins over Cornell. It's small too, which is very convenient (about 10 minutes from end to end) although it doesn't look small at all.

What are your classes like?

I take a bunch of "writing intensive" courses, because I'm a Sociology and Africana Studies double major. They involve a lot of discussion and a lot of research, but I really enjoy academic discussions about topics I like, even if I have to write 100 pages worth of final papers.

Tell us about your professors.

Depending on the professor, you'll get really fun ones, or ones who are a bit more strict. Overall, though, if you speak up and get to know them, you won't hate anyone. I can't remember every hating any professor of mine.

Describe the students at your school.

While there is a large minority population here, Hopkins is very adamant in teaching you that diversity comes in many different shapes, sizes, and perspectives. There are students of different races (and a wide array of cultural student groups to prove this, and a multicultural student center that supports minority students), different religions (brought together by the Interfaith Center), and different sexual orientations (you may join student organizations and talk with professional staff who are openly gay, learn in Queer Theory classes, as well as help LGBT communities through community service initiatives). There are people all along the spectrum of socioeconomic status. Yet, you don't feel ostracized because you are different. Hopkins works to show that a different perspective is a valuable one, and I think the students here actively agree.

What are the academics like at your school?

You can't expect to do well at a school like this, and not study. But you never have to study alone. Professors and TAs encourage group work and study sessions, and more so, they hope you speak with them during office hours. I have created close relationships with some of my professors; I even text some of them! Professors here want you to succeed, and will be more than happy to mentor you while you figure out how to succeed. The classroom setting, coupled with the one-on-one sessions that students take advantage of with their professors, teach you critical thinking skills, public speaking skills, as well as how to solve a problem, many times in an interdisciplinary field or from a multidimensional perspective. Hopkins prepares you on how to make the best of your educational opportunities, and how to enjoy working late because you sculpt your major, your courses, and your responsibilities according to your interests.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

When I hear people talking about Hopkins, the image that comes to their heads is of competitive pre-med students who spend most of their nights and weekends at the library. And considering that many people also see Baltimore as a dangerous city, that factor gives students more reason to stay secluded in the Hopkins bubble, right? Wrong. I don't think I have pulled a single all-nighter here at Hopkins, and I'm now a senior. Most of my friends, and many of the students I know, have learned how to prioritize their studies, and still have time to go out to dinner at the Harbor, or watch a movie at Towson, or participate in community fairs and festivals throughout Baltimore. I do not doubt that you can find some students who are interested in studying alone, but I have not met any. Since my freshman year, I have studied with friends, classmates, and colleagues in our common rooms, the hallways, the cafeterias, and the quad. You learn to build a community, and when you're around intellectual people like yourself, you learn very quickly that it is much more valuable to socialize with them and learn something new, than purely from a textbook.

Details

  • Enrollment
  • 6,042
  • Tuition & Fees
  • $50,410
  • Acceptance rate
  • 13%

Campus Topics

    • {{q.Category}}
      • {{q.Question}}
        ({{q.TotalAnswered}} answers)
      • No Answers Yet :(
        Be the first to write a review!
        {{vm.getPercentage(pa.TotalAnswered,q.TotalAnswered)}}% "{{pa.Answer}}"

Most-Answered Questions

We use student reviews and the most current publicly available data on our school pages. As such, we don't typically remove or edit college information. Sources for school statistics and data include the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics and the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System. Portions of college data include copyrighted material, which is reproduced on this website by permission of Wintergreen Orchard House, a division of Carnegie Communications. © 2009-2016 by Wintergreen Orchard House. All rights reserved.

Johns Hopkins University administrators: claim your school to add photos and details.