Legislators

What they do:

Develop, introduce or enact laws and statutes at the local, tribal, State, or Federal level. Includes only workers in elected positions.

On the job, you would:

  • Analyze and understand the local and national implications of proposed legislation.
  • Appoint nominees to leadership posts, or approve such appointments.
  • Confer with colleagues to formulate positions and strategies pertaining to pending issues.
  • Debate the merits of proposals and bill amendments during floor sessions, following the appropriate rules of procedure.
  • Develop expertise in subject matters related to committee assignments.
  • Hear testimony from constituents, representatives of interest groups, board and commission members, and others with an interest in bills or issues under consideration.
  • Keep abreast of the issues affecting constituents by making personal visits and phone calls, reading local newspapers, and viewing or listening to local broadcasts.
  • Maintain knowledge of relevant national and international current events.
  • Make decisions that balance the perspectives of private citizens, public officials, and party leaders.
  • Negotiate with colleagues or members of other political parties in order to reconcile differing interests, and to create policies and agreements.

Knowledge

Skills

Abilities

Work Activities

Interests

  • Enterprising
  • Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • First Interest High-Point
  • Primary-Rank Descriptiveness
  • Social
  • Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
  • Second Interest High-Point
  • Secondary-Cutoff/Rank Descriptiveness
  • Investigative
  • Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Artistic
  • Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
  • Conventional
  • Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
  • Realistic
  • Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Third Interest High-Point
  • Tertiary-Cutoff/Rank Descriptiveness

Work Styles