Hearing Aid Specialists

What they do:

Select and fit hearing aids for customers. Administer and interpret tests of hearing. Assess hearing instrument efficacy. Take ear impressions and prepare, design, and modify ear molds.

On the job, you would:

  • Select and administer tests to evaluate hearing or related disabilities.
  • Administer basic hearing tests including air conduction, bone conduction, or speech audiometry tests.
  • Train clients to use hearing aids or other augmentative communication devices.
  • Create or modify impressions for earmolds and hearing aid shells.
  • Maintain or repair hearing aids or other communication devices.
  • Demonstrate assistive listening devices (ALDs) to clients.
  • Diagnose and treat hearing or related disabilities under the direction of an audiologist.
  • Perform basic screening procedures such as pure tone screening, otoacoustic screening, immittance screening, and screening of ear canal status using otoscope.
  • Assist audiologists in performing aural procedures such as real ear measurements, speech audiometry, auditory brainstem responses, electronystagmography, and cochlear implant mapping.
  • Read current literature, talk with colleagues, and participate in professional organizations or conferences to keep abreast of developments in audiology.

Knowledge

Skills

Abilities

Work Activities

Interests

  • Investigative
  • Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Social
  • Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
  • First Interest High-Point
  • Primary-Rank Descriptiveness
  • Realistic
  • Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Enterprising
  • Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Conventional
  • Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
  • Second Interest High-Point
  • Secondary-Cutoff/Rank Descriptiveness
  • Artistic
  • Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
  • Third Interest High-Point
  • Tertiary-Cutoff/Rank Descriptiveness

Work Styles