Freight Forwarders

What they do:

Research rates, routings, or modes of transport for shipment of products. Maintain awareness of regulations affecting the international movement of cargo. Make arrangements for additional services, such as storage or inland transportation.

On the job, you would:

  • Select shipment routes, based on nature of goods shipped, transit times, or security needs.
  • Determine efficient and cost-effective methods of moving goods from one location to another.
  • Reserve necessary space on ships, aircraft, trains, or trucks.
  • Arrange delivery or storage of goods at destinations.
  • Arrange for special transport of sensitive cargoes, such as livestock, food, or medical supplies.
  • Assist clients in obtaining insurance reimbursements.
  • Calculate weight, volume, or cost of goods to be moved.
  • Complete shipping documentation, such as including bills of lading, packing lists, dock receipts, and certificates of origin.
  • Consolidate loads with a common destination to reduce costs to individual shippers.
  • Inform clients of factors such as shipping options, timelines, transfers, or regulations affecting shipments.

Knowledge

Skills

Abilities

Work Activities

Interests

  • Conventional
  • Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
  • First Interest High-Point
  • Primary-Rank Descriptiveness
  • Second Interest High-Point
  • Secondary-Cutoff/Rank Descriptiveness
  • Enterprising
  • Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Investigative
  • Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Realistic
  • Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Social
  • Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
  • Artistic
  • Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
  • Third Interest High-Point
  • Tertiary-Cutoff/Rank Descriptiveness

Work Styles