Winston-Salem, NC
Wake Forest University


91 Ratings

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Recent Reviews

Carlos
What is your overall opinion of this school?

The campus is utterly breathtaking. The historic architecture set against the progressive backdrop of the seasons is just pla...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

The campus is utterly breathtaking. The historic architecture set against the progressive backdrop of the seasons is just plain easy on the eyes. In terms of size, if you live on campus you avoid that winded feeling of a marathon runner you might get traveling between classes on a larger campus because everything is relatively close. Even on the worst days it takes 10 minutes at most to get to your farthest class. Yet you never feel smothered or cloistered by the people or surroundings. I'd say Wake Forest hits a relative sweet spot in terms of size. The quality you'll be most thankful for is the low student to teacher ratio. Learning is much more engaging when it has the chance to be interactive. The library is amazingly huge and has an in-house Starbucks that is a godsend on some days, and a computer trouble-shooting office. Wake Forest does a great job of accommodating students' needs. I've seldom had difficulty getting something done. Some detractions are that if you don't have a car there's isn't any good social hotspots nearby and social events on campus are largely directed at frats and sororities.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

There's a large association with greek life, though this doesn't reach the level of rambunctiousness typified in movies and television. The statistic is that almost half of students belong to some greek association, hence many social events revolve around them which is maybe why there's such a large percentage. Another stereotype is that many of the kids here come from wealthy, old money families and are pretentious. While this is mostly true, the pretentiousness is only true on the rarest of occasions.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

The most popular organizations are fraternities or sororities, though there are many groups dedicated to community service. The Wake Forest motto is Pro Humanitate so there's always some type of outreach or community service program/organization, which draws in large numbers of students. There are really several clubs to join, even something as obscure as water-rafting or meditation. It's doubtful you won't find something that you're interested in. I write for the school newspaper and help with the literary magazine, both things i vastly enjoy. The only problem is that i'd like to join more clubs but just don't have the time. If you're an incoming freshman, making friends is relatively easy and the dorms are generally sociable. Though as a transfer student there's definitely more work and initiative necessary to build a social circle. Athletic events are hugely popular here, especially tail-gating. If you're not involved in a fraternity or sorority it will be difficult to find social events on campus but if you have a car there are several things to do in town. Wake Forest also offers a shuttle service into town as well. Much of my time is spent attending club activities, going to lectures, presentation, or documentary screenings, and writing (sounds nerdy, but is in all honesty a blast to me). There is also the occasional game or party. There are many traditions here at Wake Forest, many of them dry and boring in themselves, but serve as excellent social frames for meeting people and spending time with friends. Some of the famous traditions are teepeeing the quad and Hit the Bricks, a fundraiser in which you complete circles around the quad with a bag full of bricks (no really, it's fun).

Describe the students at your school.

My experiences have met with little friction in terms of race, religious beliefs, socio-economic conditions, etc. Though this school isn't as racially diverse as its pamphlets may try to convey. The school is mostly white, middle to upper class kids from around the area. Though there are some fragmented groups of minorities that tend to obscure themselves from the population by choice. Though if you're a minority and looking to find more people with a similar culture then it may not be the place you're looking for. Many students here are fairly well off so there might be some separation in that respect, but that kind of discrimination is hardly present. There's no real expectation as to what you should wear. People dress as casually or professionally as they please. Some of this might also be dictated by the types of classes they take. There are politically active associations so politics is definitely students are cognizant of, most tending to be right-leaning. Money and future professional success are large motivating factors here. There's definitely a liberal arts community here that's interested in issues, arts, and society, but more so students are inclined to getting well-paid, professionally respectable jobs like a lawyer or doctor. By no means am i discouraging the artistic or liberal-minded individual. There is a place here for you as well. The different tables at dinner are largely determined by what organizations you belong to (mostly greek), but some other categories are groups of minorities, an intellectual/artistic crowd, and athletes.

What are the academics like at your school?

A good percentage of the time professors will know your name. Classes tend to be small so there is an expectation for you to participate. If you're looking for it, you will run into people willing to engage in intellectual conversations. Many of the people here are receptive, thoughtful, and curious about your views (if you have any). Studying makes up a large part of the academic culture here. True story, i've seen people reading textbooks while doing sit-ups and walking on the treadmill at the gym. So this is definitely a place intended for the intellectually curious and disciplined. I'm double majoring in English and Philosophy and it's inspiring to see how cultured and learned the professors are in each department, and others as well. Many speak more than one language and have an intimate knowledge of topics peripheral to their field. Though there are somewhat high expectations so be ready to be challenged. Much of Wake Forest's intentions are geared toward making sure you have opportunities to succeed, which means they provide many connections for job placement. Several students secure jobs soon after graduating.

Rachael
What is your overall opinion of this school?

Like the students it attracts and accepts, Wake is well-rounded. It's small enough to form relationships with professors, to ...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Like the students it attracts and accepts, Wake is well-rounded. It's small enough to form relationships with professors, to never walk around without seeing someone you know, to guarantee on-campus housing, to network, and to reach any part of campus in under ten minutes . It's big enough to always meet new people, to attract professors highly-involved in the professional world, to compete competitively in sports, to host top graduate programs, and to call Maya Angelou our own. When you say you go to Wake Forest, people are impressed. Oftentimes though, they can't quite remember where it is. That would be Winston-Salem, NC, known for Hanes Brand and tobacco but not known so much as a college town--which is probably one of the main complaints consistently heard from Wake students in addition to the Campus Police's incompetence to deal reasonably and consistently with on-campus drinking. In a most recent discussion with Administration, students complained that if the school wants to move parties safely back to campus, there needs to be a safe, fun place to drink on campus. Impressively, the Administration immediately answered with new social venue, "The Barn"--success to be determined, perhaps. In the meantime, many students enjoy mild socializing in on-campus locations such as Starbucks, dorm lounges and courtyards, as well as my personal favorite hangout: student-run coffee shop, Campus Grounds. There's someplace for everyone--even if it is one of the seven floors of the ZSR library (which is often the case.)

What are your classes like?

As an English major, my classes are small (10-20 students) and largely discussion-based. Any intro classes that I've taken (100 level) have been larger (20-30 students)--science and math intro classes being much larger in size and lecture-based (around 30-80 students). Overall, my upper-level classes (300 level) are challenging but no class has ever been unmanageable without help from my professors. Course load is everything. My discernment of the number combination of classes that I want to take in a semester has been crucial to how stressful and enjoyable the classes have been--and to my success in those classes.

What are the academics like at your school?

Work Forest: work hard, play hard. Admittedly, I was intimidated by this play on words as an incoming Freshman. However, from my experience, I've found that professors' willingness to invest in students often counteracts the somewhat daunting work load characteristic of a "Top 25" university. It's not uncommon for professors to invite students into their homes for dinner. My professors know my name and care whether or not I participate in class--especially as an English major. Even my "pre-med" friends, who have larger, lecture-style classes, value their one-on-one relationships with professors as an essential part of class--which also speaks to the difficulty and demand of the pre-med track. As far as I can tell, pre-med students, as well as Calloway Business School students, study more than anyone else on campus. These departments are especially geared towards getting jobs whereas I find that humanities departments are geared more towards learning for learning's sake. However, regardless of department, students are competitive. We are also required to dabble in all areas of academics thanks to a liberal arts curriculum. For this reason, I've taken unexpectedly unique classes such as my freshman seminar, Life Perspectives. Based on psychology, this class revolved around a variety of books and memoirs that express different world views. The class was made up of all types of majors and backgrounds but proved driven by the same Wake academic spirit of eager discussion and desire to place learning in the larger context of life. At Work Forest, this learning spirit is summed up in our mission: Pro Humanitate--for humanity.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

The most rampant stereotype of Wake students boils down to two words: "Preppy" and "Frat". This stereotype is based on the large percentage of the student population belonging to a Greek organization--a percentage that feels much greater than that advertised by the Admissions Office. In truth, the social vibrancy of the campus almost entirely revolves around Frat parties and Sorority functions; and, if you were to take a stroll around campus, you wouldn't be able to deny the prevalence of labels such as J.Crew and Polo. Even so, these characteristics are fruits of Wake's Southern charm. Friendliness and hospitality are as much a part of this stereotype; and, student-to-student, the stereotype of a Demon Deacon extends to exceptionally ambitious and driven. We don't call it Work Forest for nothing.

Kendall
What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

It's true that Greek life is a major part of the social scene at Wake. Since it is so prominent, there is also a pretty obvio...

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

It's true that Greek life is a major part of the social scene at Wake. Since it is so prominent, there is also a pretty obvious divide between Greeks and non-Greeks. Individual chapters, however, are a lot smaller than at bigger state schools, so it is much more common that people have friends outside of their Greek organization. Wake students in general are involved in a multitude of activities around campus and in the Winston-Salem community, so even those that decide not to join Greek life can find their niche.

What are the academics like at your school?

Wake students are driven individuals and the work load at Wake reflects that. All majors are rigorous and require a lot of work outside of class. It's not unusual for the ZSR library to be completely filled most nights. Most students would agree that if you work, you get a B. A's are much harder to come by. Luckily, Wake has a great faculty that, for the most part, is willing to meet outside of class to help students. As an English major, most of my professors have even required scheduling a meeting with them once or twice throughout the semester. Class sizes are small and strictly lecture style classes are rare. In my experience, professors are interested in facilitating class discussion and participation is almost always an important part of my final grade. Also, since Wake is a liberal arts school, students are required to complete a series of divisional courses that extend to all the major areas of study provided at Wake. Sometimes this can be a little frustrating when it requires an English major, like me, to take classes like statistics and physics, but I think it also requires you to be more well-rounded, which in turn makes you more eligible in job markets.

Morgan
What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

The most prevalent stereotype on the Wake Forest campus is "the frat star". This is due to the university's large Greek Life ...

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

The most prevalent stereotype on the Wake Forest campus is "the frat star". This is due to the university's large Greek Life population. Nearly 45% of students participate in a Greek organization. This means there are a lot of kids on campus wearing frat attire: Polos, Sperrys, Vineyard Vines, Lilly Pulitzer, Frey boots, etc. They also have big parties off campus that are attended by many students both Greek and non-Greek. Some parents and prospective students may view this as a negative. They may think that Fraternities and Sororities are a distraction and believe they will inhibit a student’s academic achievements. This may be true at other universities but it does not hold true at Wake Forest. As a senior at Wake Forest University and a member of Greek Life, I can tell you that the Greek Students at WFU are also some the most involved and influential people on campus. Their organization might be important to them but it does not define them. Sorority women are involved in club sports as well as varsity soccer, field hockey, and cheer teams. They participate in Wake Radio, Wake TV, and student Government. They are also in many theater and dance performances. The All-Sorority GPA average (3.2) is typically higher than the All-Women GPA average on campus. This is due to the strong support system that sororities create for their members. Sororities also emphasize the importance of academic excellence and often reward their members for their achievements. Fraternity men are just as active. Many are student trustees or student advisers. Some are in student government, others play club soccer, lacrosse, and rugby. They are also involved with habitat for humanity and the rape prevention group called Prepare. The Universities biggest philanthropy fundraisers are: Hit the Bricks, Wake n' Shake, and Rush for the Cure. This year all three had were chaired by members of a Greek organization. All Greek organizations require their members to be involved in at least one of activity outside of Greek life. They also require members to maintain an acceptable grade point average. If a students GPA drops too low they will be released from the organization. It is obvious that Greek students make up a large part of the student body. However there is also a diverse group of students who remain independent. These students are all unique individuals and are just as influential on campus. They run clubs and other organizations just like members in the Greek Community. Actually, most the time Greeks and Non-Greeks are working side by side to put together big campus events. The fact that a student is not involved in Greek Life will not lessen their experience at WFU. They will form just as many lasting friendships. They will also have equal opportunities in all extracurricular events. Wake Forest is much more than colorful polos and Sperrys. Whether you are Greek or not, there is a place for you on Wake’s campus. The small size brings people together and allows students to get involved with a variety of activities. Yes there are stereotypes but they do not truly represent the diverse spirit of Wake Forest.

Leah
What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

Wake Forest has a large Greek population, with about 50% of students in fraternities and sororities. Each fraternity and Soro...

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

Wake Forest has a large Greek population, with about 50% of students in fraternities and sororities. Each fraternity and Sorority has its own stereotype, which becomes apparent after one spends time on campus. However, there are plenty of unaffiliated students, and a large amount of clubs and activities that each attract their own "type". As a school with Division 1 athletics, there'd is a "clique" of athletes, and we have theme housing which allows for a variety of groups to form.

Kory
What is your overall opinion of this school?

I think the most unique aspect of Wake Forest is its size. While the campus is small enough to navigate around in fifteen mi...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

I think the most unique aspect of Wake Forest is its size. While the campus is small enough to navigate around in fifteen minutes, the facilities it boasts are impressive. A wide variety of academic curriculum are available, and with a small community comes small class sizes and the opportunity for better teacher-student interaction. The prestige of the campus in relation to its size cannot be overstated. It is simply one of the most well-known small schools left. In addition, the community on campus is distinctly set apart from the town, but the town is close enough to drive to and experience.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

There are literally too many popular student activities/groups to list here. Whether it is the vibrant Greek life scene on campus, or the thriving media organizations, students are quick to find their niche here at Wake. Even the Division I athletic teams we boast are exciting to support during their regular seasons. Parties are common, and every Wednesday is the only week day you will find available to relieve the stress of Wake Forest's academic rigor. The university owns the motto: "Study hard, Party harder."

What are the academics like at your school?

One word: rigorous. You will work hard to receive a good education here. It's not impossible to get a high GPA, but it is tough. You will often see students studying into the wee hours of the morning on any given day of the week. The students are competitive only insofar as they are intelligent, which almost every person at Wake is. It is common to see lines at a professor's door for office hour discussion. You will have to fulfill a number of divisional requirements for any degree from the university, and the requirements for each major are different.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

There is a stereotype that many students who attend Wake Forest are rich, pretentious jerks who have graduated from some iconic private school somewhere. I'd be lying if I said this stereotype was entirely untrue, as the university's prestige and somewhat expensive tuition tends to draw those with this kind of personality and background. However, both the multicultural program and student organizations have blossomed in recent years, allowing for a more diverse student body as a whole. Whatever interests you identify with will surely be accommodated here.

Toni
What is your overall opinion of this school?

When I began receiving information about Wake during my senior year in high school, my very first thought was, "everyone who ...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

When I began receiving information about Wake during my senior year in high school, my very first thought was, "everyone who goes to Wake Forest must be snobby and rich,". The school looked so elite in the brochures, and I thought I didn't have a chance of being accepted. However, I applied anyway and, amazingly, I was accepted. I didn't know of the school's fantastic reputation at first, but once I began telling people that I was accepted, I was quickly schooled on how great of a school Wake is. When I visited the campus for the first time, I knew that I wanted to spend my undergrad years here. Everyone was actually extremely nice; I honestly did not meet a single person-faculty, staff, student, or otherwise-that was not willing to talk to me about the school. I love the close-knit feel of the campus; the student body isn't too large or too small. All of the students here are very academic, but are able to find a good balance of work and play. We have so many fun campus traditions, like Seize the Quad, LoveFeast, and Rolling the Quad. The one thing that troubles me about the school is, however, the financial commitment it requires. I come from a humble background, so paying for my education at Wake has been a struggle at times. Despite this. the financial aid department is extremely helpful in directing you to scholarships and working with your family's finances. Honestly, although Wake is expensive, I feel that you definitely get what you pay for. I 100% believe that I am receiving a top notch, quality education, surrounded by amazingly bright students. Coming out of Wake Forest with a degree will definitely turn a few heads and garner a few respectful head nods!

Describe the students at your school.

Wake Forest students are some of the brightest people I have ever met. Everyone works hard in their classes and still finds time to participate in campus activities. Although Wake is majority Caucasian, there is a strong multicultural aspect to the school. Lots of activities are sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Affairs, and we actually just welcomed a new LGBTQ center to campus. A lot of students here do come from wealthy backgrounds, but in general all financial backgrounds are represented. Unlike most colleges, students at Wake DO NOT wear pajamas to class. I was a little upset at this my first year due to my idea of college life that was grown from watching too many movies, but I came to accept it. Students here don't get extremely dressed up just to go to class, but I would say that students like to show their personalities through their clothes. I have to say that most of the students I see wear clothes on the preppier side, but I've seen other fashions and styles as well. Although a lot of students come from wealthy backgrounds, a lot of students find time to give back to the community. Everyone I have met has genuinely been very nice, and although there are the usual cliques like at every other school, a lot of people have friends with different interests and backgrounds.

What are the academics like at your school?

Students here often call the school by its endearing nickname, "Work Forest". Yes, the academics at Wake Forest are intense. Yes, you will have a lot of work in a lot of your classes. Yes, you will be stressed sometimes. But in my opinion, the workload is entirely manageable if you practice good time management skills and-this is important-become familiar with your professors! Wake professors are all so helpful to their students. Every professor I have had is completely willing to meet with students to provide help on assignments, give advice, or just talk. I have even had a few professors who have invited students to their houses for casual dinners. The professors here know that Wake Forest students are intelligent, so they don't baby us. The work they assign is challenging, but they are never unwilling to provide their services in the forms of clarification or just support. Students here are very involved in their schoolwork. Students study a lot and do very well in their classes, but unlike some other schools known for high academic achievement, I feel that Wake students know when to relax and the importance of relieving stress by having a good time. Every department has amazing professors and staff (but personally, being a Psychology and English double major, I may be a little biased towards those departments!). Generally, Wake demands a lot of its students academically, but in the end it is to the student's benefit. I have learned so much during my time here, and no amount of stress that I have felt over the years can sway me to bemoan the rigor with which professors teach their students or the greatness that the professors expect of the students.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

I would say the biggest stereotype of Wake Forest students is that we are all wealthy. This is definitely not the case, although some students are obviously wealthy. Wake is home to students from all walks of life. I myself come from an extremely humble background, but I have made some amazing friends here who come from more wealthy backgrounds, as well as from backgrounds that are less wealthy than mine. Without a doubt, I have met many students here who, despite their family's either good or bad financial situations, demonstrate Wake's motto of Pro Humanitate perfectly. Wake students are tremendously dedicated to service within the community, whether it be through fundraising for good causes or simply volunteering their time in the community.

Molly
What is your overall opinion of this school?

I think Wake Forest is the perfect balance of several factors that students consider when choosing a college. The size is jus...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

I think Wake Forest is the perfect balance of several factors that students consider when choosing a college. The size is just right for the student who wants individual attention and small class sizes, but does not want to attend a tiny school where they feel like they know everyone. I have made personal connections with almost all of my professors and I have grown academically through the small class discussions that are typical in classes. However, I have also enjoyed the feeling of being on a decent sized campus and the opportunity to meet new people all of the time. Wake Forest is the perfect mix of the small academic environment and the Division I sports of a large university. I think that this school also allows for students to find balance between school and outside activities. Obviously our academic reputation is stellar and we are commonly referred to as "Work Forest." Academics are a definite emphasis and the work load can be overwhelming. However, there are so many opportunities to get involved on campus and in the community. Most students are involved in at least three activities outside of their school work and they find ways to make time for fun. I have been so grateful for the friends I have made here, who have been understanding whenever I need to cancel a social activity for school work, but are always willing to take fun study breaks.

Describe the students at your school.

It may seem apparent that any student paying over $50,000 a year for a Wake Forest education comes from a wealthy background, and it is definitely true. Students wear name-brand and designer clothing almost all the time and there are a large amount of nice cars in the student parking lot. I think someone from a disadvantaged family might feel out of place here, because students are constantly spending money on a sorority t-shirt each week or trips to the frozen yogurt shop down the street. However, I have met very few "snobs" who flaunt their money. Students are very friendly and will be genuinely kind to everyone, despite their economic background. One of the things that has impressed me is the incredibly geographical diversity of students. I have friends from California, Kansas, Texas, New Jersey, Florida, and every place in between. This is not a "suitcase college" where students are leaving every weekend, because students are simply too far away from home to swing by for the weekend. Being from Ohio, this has made my weekends so enjoyable to have so much time with my other friends from far away.

What are the academics like at your school?

We are commonly referred to as "Work Forest," meaning that the work load is definitely rough. However, I find that all of the work I do is worthwhile and beneficial to my overall education. Students study around 4-6 hours each day, which can seem daunting but becomes a habit of life here. I have thoroughly enjoyed almost all of my classes. We have a liberal arts curriculum, so the first two years of college are largely spent fulfilling divisional requirements. I have learned so much through these divisionals, particularly the educational policy and practice course that I am currently taking. I have been pushed intellectually to really consider the educational issues our society is facing and I have slowly formed my opinion of what needs to be done to create change. This class has really developed my interest in education, to the point where I may go on to pursue a career in education. This class was mostly discussion based, so I have had many opportunities to debate my ideas with other students who were going through the same intellectual thought process as me. Almost every one of my professors has known me by name and met with me personally in their office hours. I never imagined I would get this personal of an experience at the college level. I have been invited to two professors' homes for dinner and another professor has set up times when we can meet him at a local bakery to talk. Overall, the environment has been very nurturing, but still challenging and intellectually stimulating. The professors do an excellent job of guiding students along in their thought process, while not babying them along the way.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

While this stereotype is accurate for the most part, the university is more diverse than it may seem at first glance. You will definitely see girls in Lily Pulitzer dresses and guys wearing suits and bow ties at tailgates before the football games. The amount of Lily Pulitzer planners and cell phone cases I see in class is extreme, but there are definitely students who stray from this stereotype. If you are not a fan of the preppy style, there are certainly a number of students who come to class dressed in normal casual clothes, but it is rare to see a student come to class in sweatpants. I have found that the students tend to take pride in this stereotype because they believe it is a good way to begin preparing for the real world. Students are conscious of the fact that in a few years they will be expected to show up to work in business attire and they feel that they need to begin dressing professionally now as they make connections with their professors and classmates.

Samantha
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

If I could go back in time to and talk to myself as a high school senior, I would worn myself about the amount of homework, s...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

If I could go back in time to and talk to myself as a high school senior, I would worn myself about the amount of homework, studying, and late nights it would take to make sure I received good grades. I would also worn myself about the amount of money it would take. I would also tell myself that I needed to be more serious about my homework and what type of grades I wanted to received. I received A’s and B’s and still had extracurricular activities. My extracurricular activities included 4-H and showing steers all through middle and high school. I was very successful in showing as well as doing homework while I was at shows. I believe I was already ready for college other than finding out that my parents weren’t going to help me when I started my bachelors program.

Rebecca
Describe your favorite campus traditions.

Wake is best know for the amount of work it demands of its students, giving it the nickname "Work Forest".

Describe your favorite campus traditions.

Wake is best know for the amount of work it demands of its students, giving it the nickname "Work Forest".

What do you brag about most when you tell your friends about your school?

I tell my friends that I'm at a top 25 school and that my professors are some of the most intelligent in their fields.

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