New Orleans, LA
Tulane University of Louisiana


124 Ratings

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Recent Reviews

Janine
What is your overall opinion of this school?

Tulane University was unbeknownst to me during the never-ending process of college applications. Quite frankly, I had no id...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Tulane University was unbeknownst to me during the never-ending process of college applications. Quite frankly, I had no idea what I was looking for. But like many of my peers I found it in New Orleans without expecting to. My first impression of the school was derived from the seemingly endless flow of mail being sent to me. What I perceived as desperateness on the part of the administration was actually the strategic way to increase the applicant pool, thus making the university more competitive each year. I did not have to write an essay to apply and the application would be free. I applied without even considering the school or taking my application seriously. Ironically, I was touring the University of Miami when my interest in Tulane was sparked. The elder sibling of a girl taking the Miami tour with me was a freshman at Tulane University. Her enthusiasm for Tulane drowned out the words of the tour guide. I realized that I had to visit. As I wandered around Tulane’s campus just a month later, I fell victim to the familiar embarrassment of being a prospective student with my parents by my side. I couldn’t help but notice that that when students gazed my way and noticed the bright green “Roll Wave” folder I was holding, instead of giving me a vapid stare they smiled. People seemed happy and it was as simple as that. I was leaving the LBC (equivalent to a student union on other campuses), when I thought I heard my name. I wasn’t sure, so I kept walking. But the shout persisted and got clearer. It was the girl from the Miami tour. She recognized me and when I turned around she gave me a hug and took a break from her studies to provide a squeal to the group tour I had just taken. She showed me her favorite study spots, and a room in every freshman dorm. Although she didn’t have to do much talking to sell me on the picture-perfect campus, she did anyway. Her pride for Tulane was undeniable. She told me everything and anything she could think of, and she introduced me to numerous friends that she ran into on campus. The students professed their “love for prospective students” as well as their pride in Tulane and I was overwhelmed by how friendly everyone seemed. Making a decision had never been so easy. When I moved in my freshman year I was pleased to find that I had no reason to be skeptical of the enthusiasm of the students I had met the previous May. The happy students do not just have an odd fetish for prospective students, they genuinely want people to know what it is like to go to Tulane and live in New Orleans. The picture-perfect day I experienced upon visiting was not such an oddity either, and the weather is often sighted as one of the best things about going to Tulane. But, let me note that when it rains, it pours. Everyone has rain boots and an investment in a pair of new Hunters will not be in vain. When people ask me where I go to school I am proud to say Tulane University in New Orleans. This regularly facilitates rich conversation about the opportunities available in such a unique city, the incredible access to music, food, and culture. It is somewhere most people like to come visit or somewhere that many people hold fond memories of. Tulane students are spoiled by the free give-aways that are often doled out on campus. Forget pizza and cookies, the administration provides generous tastes of Jambalaya, crawfish, potatoes and Snowballs, consistent with New Orleans culture. Jazz music often pervades the well-kept central quad.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

Tulane University draws a unique crowd. The stereotype holds that over-privileged, well-dressed students flock to the 'dirty south' to perpetuate the mantra, 'work hard, play hard.' While it is true that the student body at Tulane is comprised of myriad students from the Northeast, with a persevering stereotype popularizing the nickname 'Jewlane' (T-Shirts were sold on the quad last year due to popular demand), Tulane University benefits from the geographic diversity that is the reality. Students from different regional backgrounds are drawn to the culturally rich party city, as over 75% of its students travel over 500 miles from home to attend. Even though students come to Tulane from all over the country, many do come from well-to-do families (around the country) eager to get a taste the crawfish, grits, and jambalaya and party it up during Mardi Gras, and just about any other possible opportunity. However, when students partake in such festivities, they do so in style. Girls at Tulane are known to showcase the latest fashion trends, hinting at the capital of their families. The stereotype maintains that the girls are more attractive than the boys, and this is confirmed on a daily basis. However, materialism aside, the culture of the city as well as the community service prospects unites students and it is seen that students are not just drawn to the party atmosphere of New Orleans. Although they will be sure to enjoy the lax drinking laws, and the Mardi Gras holiday break, students really do want to benefit from the culture of the city and get involved. The playing field is further leveled when scholarships doled out by Tulane Admissions each year are considered, as all freshmen applicants are considered for partial merit scholarships, ranging from $7,500 to $25,000 per year. The blend of students from different regional backgrounds proves to falsify the stereotype that Tulanians are all snobby white kids. Well... half of the stereotype. Tulane is undeniably white. However, regional diversity undermines the homogeneity of the student body, and students are overwhelmingly intelligent, friendly, involved, and hard-working. And they definitely know how to have a good time. As the prestige of Tulane University mounts each year, the school is becoming more selective. Sororities and fraternities are in fear that the selection pool will not be as beneficial to ensuring a ‘perfect pledge class’ as the intellect correlates positively with dorkiness, which is not a bad thing.

What are the academics like at your school?

Tulane University is the only college in the country that I know of that has integrated a service-learning requirement into the curriculum. This two-tier requirement means that students must complete a total of 40 community service hours, revealing the willingness of students to give back to the school and community. I completed this requirement at Sophie B. Wright, a nearby charter school. The program was arranged through the Latin American Studies department. I was paired with a seventh grade student as a reading buddy. I found this experience to be very valuable. As the University is consistently ranked amongst the nation’s top universities, incoming students should not expect to party away their four years in New Orleans, although some are tempted. Students will, consequently learn to maintain a balance between the academic rigors and cultural and social events. With each progressive year, the freshman class at Tulane continues to raise the academic bar and the high caliber staff exceeds expectations. Tulane University is classified as a ‘medium size university,’ with a total undergraduate enrollment of 7,803 students. This means that students can anticipate seeing many familiar faces while walking on campus, but also expect to meet new students throughout the duration of their time at Tulane. Introductory lecture courses on average are large, ranging from one to two hundred. Even in this larger lecture setting, however, courses have been taught by dedicated professors willing to make time for students. The majority of my courses during the first two years consisted of twenty students or less. My freshman year Spanish class, for example, had just twelve. As a student in the honors program, I have benefitted from the fact that classes become even more intimate. This ensured individual attention that facilitates the strong academic ethos of Tulane. I have never had a teacher than did not know my name after one or two weeks of class. Contacting professors is incredibly easy, as professors commonly make their cell phone numbers available. As a freshman I was shocked to find that the library closes at 9:00 p.m. on Friday and Saturday nights. I felt that this was not conducive to studying, but students prove to be highly motivated and resourceful, ignoring that going out every night of the week is an option. I oftentimes find myself wondering how students at Tulane do it, but they manage to get work done, and do it exceptionally well. Majoring in English and International Development, the liberal arts curriculum of Tulane University allows for so much flexibility that I have been able to also minor in art studio. Even though I was an exploratory freshman, the roundabout path of arriving at my major illustrates that education at Tulane is geared to learning for its own sake. I have multiple favorite teachers from Tulane. In my beginning drawing course I met one of the most dedicated teachers imaginable. Aaron Collier opens his art courses to students of all skill levels and is committed to the teaching the art of ‘learning to see.’ Students are willing to collaborate and the atmosphere is one of sharing.

Alex
What is your overall opinion of this school?

Tulane is a small school. The school is growing, but compared to many schools that attract a similar type of student (Univers...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Tulane is a small school. The school is growing, but compared to many schools that attract a similar type of student (University of Miami, WashU, Vanderbuilt) it is much smaller. The sports program isn't particularly great and there isn't a lot of spirit for the sports teams. Tulane's nightife is unmatched, and is definitely in one of the greatest college towns. There are a lot bars, restaurants and shopping in walking distance from the school. There are limited majors, but you are not required to apply to switch if you want to change the school your in (you don't need to apply to change into the Business School, Public health school, etc.)

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

More than a third of students participate in greek life. There is an active student government, green club, theater programs and interesting campus programing. There are two bars that are basically on campus, and about five more in walking distance on maple street.

Describe the students at your school.

Very jewish, very northern. There are students from across the country, but i think there are an equal amount from New York as there are from Louisiana in the freshmen class.

What are the academics like at your school?

Professors will know your name. They are always helpful at office hours and the school has a great tutoring center. There are a lot of bad professors, but also some really great ones. I have loved taking Legal studies, ethics and economics.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

Tulane is often thought of as a "party school." You only need to spend a little time in New Orleans to see why this is the case. Students at Tulane are quite diverse, however. Tulane students are known for being involved on campus, and the University's community service requirement gets students involved in New Orleans. Tulane is becoming a more and more competitive school to get into, and this has caused interest in the school by a whole different class of students. Tulane is defiantly a play hard school, but there are so many different things going on and defiantly a lot of smart students. The school is heavily northern, and my of the students come from areas around the country's large cities. The school is about a third Jewish.

Vivien
What is your overall opinion of this school?

Generally, Tulane students are regarded as being party animals who are either native to Louisiana or from the Northeast. Tula...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Generally, Tulane students are regarded as being party animals who are either native to Louisiana or from the Northeast. Tulane is also considered to have an ethnically diverse student body which a lot of school spirit and affinity for greek life. Additionally, being in New Orleans, students are considered to be humanitarians looking to rebuild the city post-Katrina. Partying is definitely a huge aspect of life at Tulane and in New Orleans! Most of the bars only require an ID of 18+ to enter. This allows freshmen and sophomores a wide range of places to go including The Boot, a bar so close to campus, most students pass it on their way between classes. While nights in New Orleans are filled with infinite numbers of things to do, places to eat and even more places to drink, the students are all miraculously motivated. Lectures are taken seriously and upper classmen in particular mature into thoughtful, intellectual young adults. Underclassmen are another story. Greek life consumes about a third of the incoming freshmen. Within a year or two, many have dropped their sororities and fraternities. We have kids from all over (my class oddly has no one from Vermont) though I would say it seems most students are from Louisiana, Texas, New York, Connecticut, New Jersey, or California. If I had to guess, I'd say 85% of the student body is Caucasian. Community service is a big part of who the students are. We are required to do 2 classes while enrolled that are community service oriented. I had expected to be given a hammer and some nails and literally rebuild homes and schools that had been destroyed or damaged by the hurricane. In reality, most TU students are assigned to tutor students from local schools or lead debate teams for schools in the New Orleans area. Students looking for a real feeling of satisfaction should seek out Habitat for Humanity or any of the numerous programs readily available and eager for help in NOLA.

Where is the best place to get work done on campus?

I prefer studying outdoors. Most students though will congregate in the library or the PJ's coffee shop on McAlister and Willow for study sessions. If the weather is nice, I will work outside the LBC (our student center) or on the quad behind Bruff (our dining commons). The Bruff quad is often packed with girls in bikinis sunbathing while studying for exams. I suppose depending on your gender or sexual orientation, this could be among the worst places to study. When boys aren't playing frisbee though, it makes for a relaxing, low key place to get some work done. A popular place to study is in the study room on the first floor of the LBC. There are couches that tend to act as beds during exams and individual desks with outlets. It's always dead silent in there which freaks me out but I have gotten a lot of work done in there. Another option is any one of the study rooms. Most dormitories have at least one study room on each floor. My favorite study rooms are in the Wall dormitory. They are new, modern, have their own thermostats, dry erase boards and have phenomenal natural light from floor to ceiling windows which let the Louisiana sunshine into the room. One of the things I love about Tulane is how relaxed the campus is. Almost anywhere can be made into a nice place to study. You'll see students on benches, at tables outside, sitting on the quads, or in any of the buildings working. It's not that we're always working, but we have a beautiful campus that allows us to get comfortable outside our dorm rooms.

What's the dating scene like?

The dating scene has been entirely redefined over the past several years. Like most schools, Tulane has thrown monogamy out the window and is run entirely by the hookup culture. One night stands are common while finding a partner(s) to have casual sex with is even more common. There are a handful of couples within the student body.Generally these relationships form freshmen year and deteriorate by the spring semester. Because alcohol flows so readily, it contributes heavily to the hook up mentality. Most people meet at bars off campus such as The Palms, The Boot, Bruno's or Rocko's.

What are the academics like at your school?

Classes usually meet every other day. Beginner language classes might meet 4 or 5 times a week while writing workshops in the English department meet for 3 hours once a week. I am enrolled in 6 classes (or 18 credits) and 5 of my 6 professors know my name. The one professor who doesn't lectures a psychology 101 course with about 100 students. In 3 years, this is the biggest class I've been in and the only time a professor hasn't known my name. Generally classes have between 15-25 pupils. However, smaller classes are available. Last year I took a course with only 6 other students. Every student is assigned an advisor and once the student chooses a major, he or she is assigned a new advisor in that specific department. Courses are both manageable and competitive. Most students come out of classes they are interested in with As or Bs. Discussion about class topics is very common outside the classroom but only by certain people. Upperclassmen have a greater interest in discussing the outside world because their entry into it is imminent. Politics and international issues in the news are popular topics (though local sports seems to take the cake) to discuss. This may also have to do with most upperclassmen living off campus and thus not being entirely consumed within the "Tulane Bubble." The best courses I've taken are within the Sociology, English, Psychology and Art departments. Sociology and English courses rely heavily on class participation while psychology is just fascinating to learn about. The art professors insist you call them by their first names and the environment is totally conducive to creative thought. The Pre-Requisites are relatively dull but after you knock them out, you have literally thousands of courses to choose from, one of which is glass-blowing. This is the class everyone should take before they graduate. Sometimes I like to sit in the studio during the winter and just watch firey balls of magma go in and out of the oven. One time I was there and a boy made me a glass rose right in front of my eyes! Needless to say, studios are always open and those who partake in the making of art and those who watch are always welcome. It should be noted, few students share my interest in the arts. Most students are enrolled in the "B School" or the business school. It's these courses which are taught with the focus on future employment while all other schools teach for the sake of learning. Professors offer office hours 1, 2 or 3 times a week depending on their schedule. Students are not only welcome but encouraged to go during these times to discuss their progress in the course, express any concerns, or just to have a casual talk about life. Every professor I've had has encouraged students to come see them outside class and when I've gone, I've never regretted it afterward.

Samantha
What is your overall opinion of this school?

My favorite thing about this school is definitely New Orleans, which has a ton of amazing things for college students to enjo...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

My favorite thing about this school is definitely New Orleans, which has a ton of amazing things for college students to enjoy. Everyone knows about the French Quarter and Bourbon Street, but most people don't realize that Maple Street is about one block away from campus, and is filled with bars, restaurants and shops. There are always promotions and events, and it is absolutely impossible to be bored on any given night. Uptown is an awesome place to be, and it's impossible not to fall in love with NOLA culture. There's also a thriving Greek scene, and those parties are always a lot of fun. The campus is beautiful, and the perfect size. It is big enough that you will never meet anyone in your class, but it is small enough that you will always see the people you want to see. One of the best things about Tulane is the weather, which starts out very humid but then hovers around 70 for much of the year. The professors are a mixed bag, with many being very good and others being pretty awful. However, if you use ratemyprofessor and the course evaluations that are posted online, you can avoid some of the bad ones. Students always complain about registration, but I've never actually heard of it impeding anyone's ability to graduate. Our football coach recently resigned (it's common knowledge that he was fired), and students are split on the topic of what we should do next. Some say that this is our chance to finally become a football powerhouse, while others say we should remain focused on academics. There is a lot of school pride but not usually in the context of athletics, although our baseball team is very good. Almost every student I know does community service, mostly of their own volition. We do have service learning courses, which vary between incredible and useless. It's simply luck of the draw.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

It's really easy to get involved at Tulane, and there is an activity for every interest. Student Government is very popular, and there is an undergraduate government as well as separate councils for each school. Cactus is one of the largest student organizations, and it spearheads many community service opportunities. Another popular organization is TUCP, which plans campus programming, and brings musicians, speakers and activities to campus. One of the major events of the year is Crawfest, which is free to Tulane students, and basically involves eating unlimited Crawfish while tanning on the quad listening to local bands. This is something almost all students participate in, and it is not to be missed. There are also a lot of events within the city, such as Po-boy fest, Southern Decadence, Mardi Gras (obviously), that attract Tulane students. Frats and sororities are exactly as important to you as you want them to be. If you want nothing to do with them, that is absolutely fine, and you can spend your time at clubs and bars around the city. If you want to join one, you will likely have best friends for life, but might also be subject to unnecessary drama. Frats have a lot of fun themed parties, and they are much more popular among underclassmen. Drinking is a huge part of Tulane nightlife, and New Orleans culture in general. However, Tulane does have a program called Tulane After Dark, which hosts comedians and other fun events on Thursday and Friday nights. There is no pressure to drink, but it is definitely a popular way to spend your time.

Describe the students at your school.

Students are generally easy-going and friendly, and open to meeting different groups of people. There are people who clearly came to Tulane to party, but there are just as many who were interested in various community service opportunities and great education. Hillel and Chabad are very popular because of the prevalence of Jewish students, but both organizations are inclusive of everyone. There are definitely a lot of wealthy people here, with a lot of BMW's and Mercedes in the school parking lot. Because Tulane gives so much financial aid, there are a lot of students that got into "better" schools and chose to come down here. This makes for a very intelligent and well-rounded student body, as well as allowing for more middle and lower class students to take advantage of the lower cost. The campus definitely leans left, but politics are not a significant part of campus life.

What are the academics like at your school?

The professors are largely pretty good, with some being better or worse than the average. Some take the time to get to know your name, but others just can't be bothered. However, if you are willing to ask for help, I have never heard of a professor rejecting that request. They will not come to you and ask, but they are there for assistance if you need it. If you want to establish a relationship with your professors, it is crucial that you attend office hours and let them know that you're interested in the subject. Many are intellectuals, and can talk about their respective subjects for hours without getting bored. There are students that have plenty of intellectual conversations outside of class, but I wouldn't say this is the majority. A lot of students are in the b-school, which doesn't exactly lend itself to analytical thinking. Science and engineering students work really hard, but probably not any harder than students at another school of Tulane's caliber. Liberal arts majors tend to enjoy their studies, while other students are more focused on their career paths. Overall, this is definitely a work hard, play hard school, and it's really important to maintain a balance. If you blow off work and party 5 nights a week, you will fail out of school, no matter what your major is. But if you never go out because you're studying all the time, you will be absolutely miserable, and not taking advantage of this opportunity. Academics are really important to most students, but they still recognize the need for fun.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

Although Tulane students are often stereotyped as being wealthy, white and jappy, there are many more people who defy this stereotype rather than embody it. There is a definite contingent of girls from Long Island walking around in designer clothing, but this is not the majority. You don't need to be like this to make friends, but you will see them on campus. Most of the people I've met are down to earth, and don't get caught up in material things. The guys are pretty bro, but there are tons who are much more laid back. It is an expensive private school, but Tulane also gives a ton of merit and financial aid, so not everyone is rich. I've met a bunch of people who are actually paying their own tuition, which is pretty impressive when you consider how high it is. The student body is definitely very white, however, and I haven't been impressed with the diversity here. It's important to remember that people come to Tulane (and NOLA) for tons of different reasons, so there really is no typical student.

Clifford
What is your overall opinion of this school?

The best thing is probably the other people. Everyone seems eager to meet new faces, and every student also becomes possessed...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

The best thing is probably the other people. Everyone seems eager to meet new faces, and every student also becomes possessed with a pervasive happiness. The things I would change are probably specific to my own experience, but if I had to generalize I would say that the administration seems to go for shiny technologies that are of questionable worth. Also, I have not personally had any problems with the science department, but I have heard from many sources that those teachers tend to delegate far too much to inexperienced teaching assistants. Most people react favorably when I tell them Tulane, or at least they seem aware that it is located in New Orleans, and then they respond positively to the city. There is certainly an uptown Tulane bubble, but downtown is always only a direct streetcar ride away. School pride has increased recently as the basketball team has become the success of our sports program. Controversy arose a couple years ago as to the status of workers in the cafeteria and in other buildings, and took the form of protest-minded students siding with the workers against Sodexo, the company which employs all of the workers. The most frequent student complaints are probably against the quality of food in the dining hall, but as a senior who has had to cook for himself, those students are perhaps in for a surprise when their meals become self-cooked.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

The most popular organization is probably TUCP, or campus programming, who procures musical guests and other events. A great source of school spirit is these events and concerts, moreso than sports teams, although they too draw many spectators. Club sports are a big draw, and fraternities usually compete in these for bragging rights and an excuse to throw victory parties. Personally, although I attend the basketball games frequently because I know some of the players, I am more involved with WTUL, or Tulane radio. There is an abundance of musical diversions, both affiliated with the school and elsewhere, because the city places a high value on music of all kinds. If I am awake on a Tuesday, I could be out at a bar, studying, talking with friends, watching a movie projected on the quad, or any number of diverse things; the night hours are just as good as day ones! Fraternities and Sororities are very important to those who are in them, but they are not universal by any means. People party very frequently, every night except sunday and monday, and maybe these if there is a good football game on. If you don't want to drink on a Saturday night, you could see a concert at the school or in town, have a fun movie party with your dorm, some popcorn and cupcakes, play frisbee on the quad with an LED equipped disk (amazing technology), or simply make a blanket and pillow fort with your significant other. With regard to the dating scene, all one really has to do is put himself or herself out there; many people meet in bars or while drinking and socializing, but class, the gym, or even a student senate meeting could all be occasion to make a romantic connection.

Describe the students at your school.

This being New Orleans, homosexuality and queerness of all types is accepted and enjoyed. Race relations in the city are famously good, and although the students generally come from Northeastern states, Tulane has enough diversity such that no incoming student would feel out of place just because he or she were a racial, sexual, political, or religious minority compared to the whole. Students who might feel out of place are those who are shy or unsociable, but I firmly believe that any incoming student could find a niche and call Tulane home. Despite this diversity within groups, sociability between groups is less common. Any individual can certainly be friends with anyone he or she desires, but most sporting events draw a different crowd than local concerts, as you would expect. Financially, there are many wealthy people at Tulane. This is neither here nor there, but those with latent class resentments or anyone for whom this would be a discomfort should be aware of this fact. Politically the student body is generally liberal, but there are both young Democrats and young Republicans groups for the partisan. Students in the business school might talk about how much they'll earn one day, but English majors like me are satisfied to look forward to that wonderful day when we just might be employed at any job.

What are the academics like at your school?

My professors do know my name, because my classes are mostly smaller english classes, with anywhere from four to thirty students. This is the norm for humanities classes, although science, business, and other large lecture classes are certainly more impersonal. My favorite class has probably been a series of classes on Ancient Greek democracy, although there are definitely more conventional "favorite class" offerings like Brazillian Dance or Guns and Gangs. My least favorite was Microeconomics; the teacher tried his best to make it interesting but it was not enough. Although students do certainly drink and socialize a lot, they also study a great deal. I am writing this from the library, and there are no empty seats within my field of vision. Class participation varies based on the size and subject of the class. Students do have intellectual conversations outside of class, my most recent being a tragic, unconventional reading of the Twilight series that saw the books as a critique of traditional gender norms and notions of relationships. Students are competitive if the class is graded on a curve (this means you, medical students). The most unique class I have taken was a service learning offering that required me to go into New Orleans criminal court in order to observe cases. It was haunting and difficult at times, but an incredible experience. Some majors are more aimed at immediate employment than others, although that really is a feature of academia in general than a Tulane particularity. I have spent some time with teachers outside of class, and learned just as much during those times, while we ate dinner or went running.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

Like any college or large group of people, Tulane has a range of sub-communities that all have their own sets of stereotypes and behaviors. In Tulane's case, one factor influences all of these groups: the city of Bacchanalia that is New Orleans. One would expect the city known for Mardi Gras to be a continuous non-stop party, and while these expectations are exaggerated by the stories one hears about decadent, intoxicating New Orleans, the image is real, and the school is populated by students who have journeyed down expecting celebration. In short, the stereotype of Tulane would be drinkers. In actuality, though, it would be more correct to refer to socializers. Parties may be seen as events solely focused on inebriation by those who are less inclined to throw them, but really they are about meeting new friends, chatting with old ones, and participating in a community. An incoming Tulanian should expect many opportunities to drink, but more importantly she should expect many opportunities to create new social ties, hear people's stories, and learn to handle herself in a friendly conversation. And isn't that what college is about?

Lily
What is your overall opinion of this school?

I know that Tulane is the perfect school for me, and I couldn't have picked a better place for undergrad. You get a great ed...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

I know that Tulane is the perfect school for me, and I couldn't have picked a better place for undergrad. You get a great education but you have the opportunity to participate in a ton of extracurriculars, as well as get part-time jobs or internships through the university. Oh yeah, and your studies definitely don't interfere with your social life. People tend to look down on Tulane, especially my peers who went to schools in the Northeast. If you want the experience of living and working and one of the greatest cities in the world, New Orleans, Tulane is the perfect choice. One of the major problems with Tulane is also the subject of recent controversy. Clearly New Orleans has a lot of crime, especially post-Katrina, and the area around the university is not the safest. Tulane sends out emails to their students when crimes occur, and these emails are sent as frequently as a couple of times a week. Tulane has a shuttle service known as Safe Ride which picks up students between 8 pm and 6 am if they feel they are in danger, or if they don't want to walk home alone. The service has gotten a lot better in recent months following a major controversy after students were robbed at gunpoint while waiting for Safe Ride. However, Safe Ride's not ideal, nor are most of the other means of public transportation around the university. You may think it's great that you go to school right by the St. Charles Streetcar, but it's the most impractical way to get somewhere fast. It's fine for sightseeing, but if you are going to work or even a concert, you don't want to wait 45 minutes for the rickety, slow trolley to pick you up. The cabs are also terrible in this city. They arrive late, don't come, and pick you up drunk. They best way to stay safe and get around in New Orleans is to get a car, or find someone who has a car to chauffeur you around.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

Greek life is popular at Tulane, but it's not the end of your social life if you don't get involved in it. While the image of Tulane as a party school has typically been linked to frats and sororities, controversy in the past ten years has led to a big crack-down in how wild Greek life gets. It's worth checking out the Greek system, but if you aren't involved in it there are many other ways to make friends. Activities like WTUL (the campus radio station) are great if you are interested in the local music scene. Students also connect with each other through the on and off campus jobs offered through the university, which is probably the best way to make friends at the school. Tulane Football plays in the Louisiana Superdome, and admission is free for all students. While going to games are fun, you won't find the same sort of excitement for sports that you'd get at other Southern schools like LSU. A lot of students actually travel to Baton Rouge to tailgate for the Tigers rather than cheer on the Green Wave, who are, well, not the best college football team. Nightlife at Tulane is centered around the college bars. The most popular of these are The Boot, The Palms and the Maple Street bars like TJ Quills and Rocco's Tavern. As students get older they inevitably gravitate farther from the university to check out more interesting 21+ venues. The social scene is not frat party oriented, most freshmen connect at bars instead of house parties, which makes it feel a lot less exclusive than other colleges. If you don't like to drink or party Tulane probably isn't a great fit for you, but there are plenty of fun things to do in New Orleans(most do involve excessive drinking, though.) There's over 400 festivals a year in the New Orleans area, and only 365 days. The most popular festivals for Tulane students are Mardi Gras, music festivals like Voodoo and Jazz Fest, the Po-Boy festival in November, and Tulane's annual crawfish boil, Crawfest. If you enjoy live music and food Tulane is a great choice, as you get opportunities to experience new tastes and sounds every day.

Describe the students at your school.

The typical Tulane student is someone who loves to party and drink. If that's not what you're into, you probably won't fit in. That being said, there's more diversity and different types of students than most people assume. While a lot of students come from well-to-do backgrounds, there's plenty of more students who are here on academic scholarships. Different students interact with each other all the time through activities, jobs, and classes. Tulane students for the most part are friendly and outgoing, more so than at other colleges and universities. This is why they are attracted to living in New Orleans and chose to attend Tulane in the first place. A lot of people assume that Tulane kids are all rich and from Northeastern Jewish communities, thus the nickname, "Jewlane." While there are a lot of students hailing from the Northeast, there are also a lot of local students, and Louisiana, Texas, and Florida are all very well represented at this school. It's not a Southern school in the sense that Ole Miss or Vanderbilt is, but it's not completely Northern either. Tulane students as a whole are politically apathetic. They are more involved in local issues, or just wrapped up in their own lives. Overall the university is politically liberal, but there's plenty of conservative students out there. If you want to get involved in politics, you can, but if you choose not to, you will be in good company.

What are the academics like at your school?

Professors at Tulane tend to be helpful, personable, and engaging, but there are plenty of duds out there as well. As at any school its important to check on sites like RateMyProf.com before you commit to a class. Classes and students are very different depending on what school you are in. The stereotypical party/slacker types are usually associated with the Business school, while the hard-working students who never stop studying are usually in the School of Architecture, or the School of Public Health. My school, The School of Liberal Arts, is somewhere in the middle. As an English and History major a lot of the class discussions are usually monopolized by 3 or 4 intelligent students, while the rest sit there blankly. The best classes I've taken are the Creative Writing workshops and the English Capstone with Professor Molly Rothenberg, where students all participate and are engaged with what they are doing. Students at Tulane tend not to be competitive. This is definitely not a dog eat dog academic environment. The academic requirements are not too hard to complete in four years, but a lot of students take four and a half or five years to finish at Tulane, which goes along with the laissez-faire, laid-back mindset of the university in general. Tulane is often commended for their public service requirement, but in reality this is treated as somewhat of a joke. Unless you do a lot of research on your class beforehand, there's a good chance your "community service" will not feel very much like service at all. For example, a lot of my friends had to make a "radio show" or conduct interviews for their service requirement, instead of more typical community service activities like working at a school or building houses. There's a lot of students who finish without many job prospects, but Tulane gives you all the tools to get jobs and internships while in college and afterwards. The best way to insure you will get a job after graduation is to work while your in school, which is not hard to do. Teach for America also has a great relationship with Tulane, and many students go on to the program after graduation.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

When you think of the typical Tulane kid, you think of someone who knows how to party. While the stereotype is that of a spoiled Northeastern frat boy or sorority girl, there's actually a lot of geographic diversity. You'll find Southerners, Midwesterners, and California hippies all here at Tulane. Tulane attracts a lot of great students who have academic scholarships, as well as students who were just looking for a party school. What they have in common is that they (usually) work hard and play much harder.

Alexandra
What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

The most common stereotype is that the students are rich Jewish kids from New York and surrounding areas. A belief about Tul...

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

The most common stereotype is that the students are rich Jewish kids from New York and surrounding areas. A belief about Tulane students from the surrounding New Orleans community is that we are snobby and uninvolved. Aside from these, there are so many different types of people on campus that it's hard to pinpoint one overarching theme. There are plenty of sorority girls in leggings and UGGs, but at the same time there are a ton of artsy people and hipsters.

Veronica
What's the dating scene like?

The simple answer is that the dating scene is whatever you make it. There is an interesting "hookup culture" at Tulane, as w...

What's the dating scene like?

The simple answer is that the dating scene is whatever you make it. There is an interesting "hookup culture" at Tulane, as with any college though. Weekends, for many students, consist of going out to clubs with the sole purpose of finding someone to bring back to their dorms. This is obviously not for everyone though, and it is really up to you. If you choose to make this an integral part of your weekends and relationships with people, you won't be judged and you'll make friends with people who have similar ideas. If you want to go on dates more conservatively though, there are those who share that belief as well. You can go to Audubon Park across the street to just have a chat or go to any of the restaurants around the city. Everything is just a streetcar ride away.

Why did you decide to go to this school?

To be perfectly honest, I had never heard of Tulane. In fact, I was planning on staying in state or going to the Northeast, but they sent me an information packet and an application so I applied. After they accepted me, I started looking into the school and its academics; that's how I found out that academically, it is a great school. Since they offered me a scholarship, I decided to take a trip down to New Orleans to visit the campus. Once there, I completely fell in love with the gorgeous campus (and the amazing park across the street), the surrounding city, and I met people who convinced me that the transition would be smooth. Turns out it was, and I've never felt more at home than I do during the school year. I have made some of the best friends, formed great relationships with professors, and learned a lot.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

Thanks to movies and tv shows, a common thought about college is that once you get there, you'll be bombarded with recruitment people telling you to "go greek!" Yes, Tulane has greek life. Yes, a large number of people join sororities and fraternities. And yes, you'll still have friends (inside and out of the greek population) if you don't rush. If joining a frat or sorority is for you, then Tulane offers that opportunity. If it isn't something you can afford or just not something you're interested in, it does not hinder you not to join. Also, there are tons of other groups you can join that are tailored to your interests, and if you can't find one: start one. It's a cliche thing to say, but Tulane will let you start your own club. It might take a lot of work on your part, but if it's something you're passionate about, it'll definitely be worth it. The great thing about it is that you can get involved in as many or as few things as you like. Tulane also runs a lot of cheesy events freshman year geared towards students meeting each other. They're silly and full of those ice breakers that everyone hates, but I met most of my best friends at some of them. It's also easy to meet people in class or in PJs, the on campus coffee shop when you're in there studying at 3am on a Monday night. I won't say that Tulane, located in the center of New Orleans, is not a party school, but there are a lot of things you can do on the weekends that don't involve alcohol if that's not for you. Every year there's a festival called Fringe Festival that lets you go to many venues downtown and watch inexpensive plays. A lot of them sound like they're going to be really stupid and then surprise you and have you laughing like crazy. Fringe isn't the only festival though: this is New Orleans, remember? There's a festival almost every week. You can spend all day at Po-Boy fest eating and then use the night to catch up on the school work you didn't do. Or if you don't want to leave campus, Tulane generally runs programs at one of the on-campus restaurants for students who don't want to go out. They have open mic night, karaoke, swing dancing, etc. At Tulane and in New Orleans, there is always something to do.

What are the academics like at your school?

Overall, the academics at Tulane are great. Disregarding the large lecture classes, which are generally intro level science classes, all the classes are small. This is definitely a plus because you have the opportunity to make your voice heard, especially since in most of the liberal arts classes, participation is strongly encouraged if not required. Another good thing about small classes is that professors know your name. You might think that they're reading off a sheet every time they call on you in class, but my Calc III professor from first semester freshman year still says hi to me by name when we walk past each other on the quad. Students are more than welcome to visit their professors during office hours , and a lot of the time, professors will set up more times to meet if the student needs extra help or cannot make the office hours. Most of the professors are very accessible, and some of them are willing to invite you and a few other students to their house for dinners or religious celebrations or just to watch the game. What I think I like the most about the academics at Tulane though, is that on any given day, you can walk through the quad or the cafeteria and hear students is deep discussion about one of their classes. I know I've had many conversations with friends about things I learn in class, and the best feeling is when you are able to start applying things from one class to another.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

At first glance, Tulane University sounds like a diverse group of intellectuals. It boasts being one of the most geographically diverse schools, and since it sits in the heart of New Orleans, one cannot help but think it will be racially diverse as well. Once you arrive there, however, the new stereotype is that we are all a bunch of rich, spoiled, white kids from the Northeast. While this is not entirely true since Tulane does have international students and at least one kid from almost every state, the average student is wealthy and from the Northeast (and I'll let you decide for yourself if they're spoiled). While, yes, this can cause a few rifts and can make the school seem more undesirable as a whole because it is not the hub of diversity that you think it might be, it is easily surmountable by exploring the surrounding city and taking advantage of all the opportunities you can to get out and enjoy New Orleans.

Marianna
What is your overall opinion of this school?

If I could change one thing it would be the visibility/number of sororities and fraternities on campus, and sadly the school ...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

If I could change one thing it would be the visibility/number of sororities and fraternities on campus, and sadly the school is trying to add more. That being said, the beauty of Tulane is that one does not need to be involved in Greek Life to have a social life. The energy of New Orleans can be enjoyed by everyone, and because the bars are open to all not being a member of Greek Life has never hurt me socially. In fact, there are ways to benefit from Greek life while not being involved. (More Greeks=More free booze/parties)

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

I'm on the Ultimate Frisbee team, the Undergraduate Student Government, TUCP (the campus programming organization), the Choir, SOAR (Students Organizing Against Racism), and I do a lot of work with the Newcomb College Institute (supports/holds events for women). There are so many clubs to get involved in--ranging from Multicultural Organizations to Humans vs. Zombies Club. Intramural/Club sports are really popular on campus as is Greek Life.

Describe the students at your school.

It's impossible to describe the students at Tulane without heavily stereotyping so I will preface my answer with this: I AM stereotyping...and this is just MY perception of the Tulane student body. We got a lot of New Yorkers, a lot of "Chicagoans" from the suburbs (myself included), a very large Jewish population, not much racial diversity (most people of color at Tulane are athletes), tons of business majors (aka folks that just wanna 'make money'). We have the girls that wear leggings and UGGs, the guys that wear polos and sperrys. That being said it is totally acceptable to wear sweatpants to class and Bruff (our cafeteria). I rock athletic shorts on the reg. Tons of folks interested in or that play music. A great Ultimate Frisbee team (my fave humans on campus...!). In general, just lots of rich white kids from the North spending their parents money on drinks/living it up.

What are the academics like at your school?

I'm having a very unique college experience academically compared to the rest of the Tulane community. As a Gender and Sexuality Studies and English major I have yet to be in a class bigger than 25 people. I'm a great example of how students can get a liberal arts education at Tulane. I feel like I have the best of both worlds. Small classes and great professors but I also have the ability as an undergraduate to do research since Tulane has many graduate studies programs. I'm getting a great education here but I think it's hard for people that are less focused and unsure of what they're passionate about. It's very easy to have all 100 person lectures freshman year if you aren't careful in choosing classes. I advise students to not try and complete all their requirements straight away (or choose a major), and instead take classes they are interested in with good professors.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

When many people think of Tulane they immediately think of Bourbon Street and the French Quarter. This leads to the stereotype that all Tulane students do is drink, which in fact is not the case. While there is a great bar scene and fun frat parties, Tulane and the city of New Orleans provide an assortment of activities for students that don't like to drink (the music scene in New Orleans can be enjoyed sober, as well as the organization Tulane After Dark which provides late night on campus activities as an alternative to the bars). In addition, Tulane students are incredibly hard workers. The phrase "work hard play hard" is a very accurate description of the Tulane mentality--the students here are incredibly driven in every aspect of life, be it their studies or having a good time.

Michael
What is your overall opinion of this school?

The best thing about this school is the different types of people that attend Tulane. Everyday you might meet someone from yo...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

The best thing about this school is the different types of people that attend Tulane. Everyday you might meet someone from your hometown, from another state, or from another country. Tulane is the most geographically diverse school in the US. In regards to size, I think Tulane is perfect both in student body population and in geographic size. Half of my classes have 10-15 students in them. The other half that have about 60 students get broken down into groups of 10-15 per professor. People are genuinely impressed when I tell them I attend Tulane. It's academic programs are respected and recognized nation wide. Like architecture students at any school, I spend the majority of my time in the studio working on projects. However, non architecture students spend lots of time in the library; I think Tulane students are big on putting academics at the top of their priorities, but also find plenty of time to have fun downtown, seeing jazz bands, and giving back to the community. New Orleans is a great college town. There is always somewhere to go and something to do. The school can be somewhat separated from the city at times, but generally students really make an effort to make it off campus to go to concerts, bars, restaurants, or to help out around the city through community service. I have no complaints about the administration at Tulane. Any problem that I've ran into be it scheduling classes or advising issues has been resolved. There are certainly times where you will need put forth a good amount of effort to resolve things, but that's life. The staff here cares, and does everything within their power to help you plan out and execute your academic path. For a university that's not so focused on athletics, I think there is a lot of school pride at Tulane. People are proud to say they go here.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

The student body at Tulane is sometimes thought to be a rich, white upperclass group of students. Being an expensive private school, it is true that there are some people who attend here who fit this description. However, the great financial aid programs Tulane has to offer really allow students from diverse cultures, backgrounds and socio-economic classes to receive their education here.

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